1929 Model A Ford Sport Coupe Dash Rewire and Happy 4th July!

1929 Model A Ford Sport Coupe Dash Rewire and Happy 4th July!

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Happy 4th July!

Decided it was high time the dash wiring was replaced as it was pretty much the same age as the car!

As you can see it was a bit crispy and the ignition switch wire was badly chafed and liable to cause a short.

The dash loom came from O’Neils and the ignition switch wire is a home made item with some loom braiding for protection.

Probably the biggest pain of the whole job was having to disconnect the speedo cable as removing the dash made the whole job a lot easier.

Pro-tip don’t leave your magnetic torch on the exhaust when you road test the car (ask me how I know :))

Whilst the dash was out it was a good opportunity to lubricate the speedo and tighten the ignition switch which can work loose and also make the dash light wire a bit safer as it’s showing its age.

Six things you may not know about Stromberg 97 carbs – Hechtspeed @myrideisme

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Seems that the MyRideisMe.com Bonneville experience never runs out of steam. Hanging out at the Nugget one evening, we bumped into Clive from Stromberg Carburetors. After a lengthy BS session, the conversation turned to carb tech. And to cut a long story short, we asked him to contribute to our ongoing “5 Things” series. Alright, so 5 turned out to be 6 – or as the English say, ‘half a dozen’.  Here’s what he had to say:

1. Stromberg Carbs Run Better With The Chokes Left In

We’ve all seen those pics at Bonneville with 97 chokes removed and the kicker linkages brazed onto the base casting. It should make sense. No choke means more air space means more cfm. And you’d be quite correct, too.

Extensive 97 flow tests carried out this year by acknowledged race carb expert Norm Schenck showed that the carb did indeed pick up a little cfm without the choke plate installed. So all those Bonneville racers were right, after all? Well, yes and no. Salt Racers are only interested in WOT. On the street it’s a different matter.

Stromberg authority Jere Jobe told that 97s run better with the chokes in, so we suspected what Norm’s tests would show. Only we forgot to tell him the full story. Here’s what he said:

“I retested the signal curve with the choke butterfly and shaft removed, with somewhat disappointing results. The signal was unstable at most of the test CFM’s, and taking the average signal at each CFM to figure the signal curve showed a much less manageable curve than with the choke parts installed. My conclusion is that the choke butterfly serves as an airflow straightening “vane” that directs the airflow to the area of the boosters with reduced turbulence. Even though the choke parts cause a reduction in flow, it is not a good trade to lose good fuel metering for that CFM gain.”

So there you have it. The same story from two very qualified horse’s mouths.

By the way, if you want to keep your choke plates fixed open, try our Choke Lock Detent kit (Stromberg Part 9537K-L), which replaces the usual round-tipped detent pin in the airhorn to lock the choke plate open.

2. Bigger Stromberg Power Valves Have Smaller Numbers

Stromberg main jets are easy. What you see is what you get. Stock Genuine 97s come with 45s which means 0.045inch. Power by-pass valves (PV) – the ones underneath the accelerator pump — use the old engineering Number and Letter Drill system, devised as a way to fill in the gaps between the 1/64th sizes. And to complicate matters, the bigger the number, the smaller the drill!

And to complicate things even further, changing your PV by one number does not always mean the same change in jet size! We offer everything from #72 up to #60 (note that I said ‘up to’).  The #72 is 0.025inch, #71 is 0.026, but #70 is 0.028 (a two thou’ jump), then #69 is 0.292 (WTF!) . The gap between #66 (0.033) and #65 is also 0.002inch before it returns to 1 thou’ per size right up to #57. We didn’t make the rules!  But it pays to remember this when you’re trying to rejet.

And while we’re on the subject, remember that the PV only starts to affect the fuel ratio at just after 50% throttle. And when you swap them, cut a slot in the centre of a wide blade screwdriver so you don’t

3. Set The Stromberg Float Dry

The float in a Stromberg 97 (and 48, 81, etc.) is supposed to be set so the fuel level (not the float itself) is 15/32 inch (plus or minus 1/32) below the top edge of the casting without a gasket. But to be honest, that’s easier said than done, especially with the engine running and a cigarette on the go.

So for increased customer safety, our Premium Service Kits (9590K-97 and 9590k-81) now recommend that the float is set ‘dry’, as we do at the factory. Rather than a float gauge, our kits now include an extra leaflet about  setting the float level. To download a copy, click here. Basically, just get the float so it sits level in the bowl when the inlet valve is shut.

All new Genuine 97 floats are pre-set at the factory, but if you’re rebuilding, you adjust the front ‘tang’ of the hinge to push it nearer or further from the inlet valve. If (and only if !) the carb is empty of gas, hold the bowl section upside down so it closes the valve by its own weight, then eyeball it through.

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Gas Stations @Shorpy

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The always excellent Shorpy photo archive has various sections this one is on Gas Stations

Friendly Service: 1942

May 1942. “North Platte, Nebraska. Gas station.” Flavors on tap from this ten-pump petro-pub include Distillate, Mobilgas, Diesel Fuel, Kerosene, Hi-Lite, Ethyl and Metro. Medium format acetate negative by John Vachon for the Farm Security Administration

Star Garage: 1942

April 1942. “Missoula, Montana. Garage.” More curbside gas pumps! Medium format acetate negative by John Vachon for the Farm Security Administration

We Fix Flats: 1942

April 1942. “Service station. Hamilton, Ravalli County, Montana.” You want Coke with that? Medium format negative by John Vachon for the Office of War Information

I encourage you to take a look at the site, it’s great!

The right air filter for Stromberg 97s (Wish I’d seen this earlier!) @Stromberg

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Here’s a 2013 article from the Stromberg website that I wish I’d seen earlier, I can 100% confirm the accuracy of the findings!

Performance issues with the Helmet Filter, very poor when warm, massive over fueling.

Will take the advice in the article in terms of the K&N element and see how it goes

From the article –

Our buddy Lez dug into his legendary vintage magazine stash for this great Street Rodder magazine tech article all about choosing the best air filters for your Stromberg 97s. Written by the highly esteemed Ron Ceridono back in 1998, with input from Stromberg expert Jere Jobe (from Vintage Carburetion North), it is, of course, just as relevant today as then. Sorry about the quality. It’s a scan of a photocopy, but if you click on the pages below, they will come up at a readable size.

While it’s well worth reading every word – hey we’ve even thrown in a free Dick Spadaro ad – if you’re looking for the ‘executive summary’, it’s this….. “if you have an air filter on your 97, make sure it’s a K&N E-3120”. Here’s why: Click the pages below to view, or ‘right-click’ this link to download the 2-page pdf. Choosing The Right Air Filter

Fuel Line Danger Ethanol?

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I was recently doing some work to diagnose the running issue on the Model A, as part of this I was applying some extra heat protection for the fuel system.

To my horror I noticed that the recently installed nitrile fuel line had begun to show significant cracking which of course could result in a fire risk if the cracks got bad enough

After some research and the verdict is don’t use nitrile fuel line with ethanol!

This hose has now been swapped out for Gates 3225 fuel line across the board The Gates line is much better quality as you can see.

Let’s see how it goes

Could this turbo engine have saved DeLorean? – Chris Theodore @Hagerty

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The twin-turbo kit from Legend Industries transformed DeLorean’s PRV V-6, and the potential was hard to deny. Courtesy Fred Dellis & Chris Theodore

Forty-two years ago, as rumors of strife and impropriety were only beginning to swirl around his fledgling car company, John Z. DeLorean entertained the idea of boosting his stainless steed. If ever a fast-looking slow car deserved more oomph, it was the DeLorean DMC-12 and its anemic 2.8-liter V-6. New York’s Legend Industries had just the thing—a twin-turbocharger upgrade that transformed the car from lamb to lion. For a tumultuous few minutes, engineer Chris Theodore and his colleagues thought they were on to something …

One day in mid-May 1980, I was sitting at my desk in Chrysler’s Highland Park Engineering Center when the phone rang. “My name is Fred Dellis,” said the voice on the other end. “I understand you’re an expert in turbocharging.”

“I have some experience,” I said. What can I do for you?”

Dellis told me he was president of Legend Industries, that they had several turbocharging programs in the works, and that Legend was looking for a vice president of engineering to lead them. I was gainfully employed at the time and told him I wasn’t interested. “You will be,” Dellis said.

He turned out to be quite persistent, and the calls continued. Finally, I decided it wouldn’t hurt to check out a potential opportunity, even if I was happy at Chrysler, so my wife and I flew to New York on a Friday evening to spend a weekend with Dellis. It was the beginning of a two-year saga I will never forget.

He turned out to be quite persistent, and the calls continued. Finally, I decided it wouldn’t hurt to check out a potential opportunity, even if I was happy at Chrysler, so my wife and I flew to New York on a Friday evening to spend a weekend with Dellis. It was the beginning of a two-year saga I will never forget.

The next morning, we were off to Long Island to visit Dellis’s Porsche/Fiat dealership in Amityville, where he introduced some of the Legend officers. In addition to his dealership, Dellis had successfully started an aftermarket turbocharging company called Windblown Systems. Emissions testing had already been completed and the kits could be dealer-installed; Windblown had even set up distribution throughout the country for Porsche 924 and VW Rabbit/Scirocco turbo kits that provided a full warranty. But Dellis wanted to take turbocharging to the OEM level. He already had a contract in hand from Fiat of North America to build a thousand Fiat Spider Turbos. He had also been in contact with John DeLorean, he said. Then he showed me the cryptic series of notes he had exchanged with John:

Dellis: “Are you interested in a turbocharged DeLorean?”

John: “Yes.”

Dellis: “Shall we meet?”

John: “Yes.”

Dellis: “When?”

John: “June 10.”

It was the John DeLorean part of the business that intrigued me. Every car guy dreams of designing his own car and starting his own car company. John looked like he might pull it off. Knowing that I would never fulfill my own dream, the next best thing would be to have a hand in helping someone else fulfill theirs.

“What will it take to bring you on board?” Dellis asked me. Before I’d even finished telling him I needed to think about it, my wife blurted out a figure. Dellis topped it, and now I was stuck. Joining Legend was a risky proposition, but I couldn’t resist the John DeLorean hook. Back in Detroit, I gave my notice at Chrysler and began preparing for the move. Then came another call from Dellis: “I need you to put together a proposal for John,” he said. “We’re meeting with him in two days.”

Proposal in hand, on June 10, 1980, I flew to New York. Dellis and I estimated the cost of the proposed twin-turbo, twin-intercooled package and headed to John’s office at 280 Park Avenue. Taking the elevator to the 43rd floor, we entered the magnificent lobby of DeLorean Motor Company.

John’s secretary, Marian Gibson, came out to escort us to his office (it was Marian who would later become a whistleblower to the British government). John was standing behind his desk as we walked in. “So you’re the guy who likes to write letters,” he said to Dellis. “Well, Mr. DeLorean,” Dellis said, “it got me in this office today.”

The whole discussion that day was very casual. I took John through the proposal, and Dellis closed the presentation with the price of the kit. Before the meeting was over, we all agreed to draw up a contract. I couldn’t believe how easy it had been, even though it was what I call a “something for nothing” deal that would be hard for an automaker to refuse: Legend would do all the engineering, development, and tooling up front, with those costs amortized into the piece price. Dellis was on cloud nine when we left DMC, and we went out on the town to celebrate.

Read on

FIRE IN THE HOLE! Mighty Model “T” Race cars along with a Brief History of the Sport in Alberta – Strong’s Garage

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Found these guys on YouTube, excellent vintage stuff!

Gentlemen Start your Engines! We’ll take a tour of two barn find survivor race cars from Alberta’s Racing Past. Take a gander at the ingenious modifications that turn these Tepid T’s into Fire Breathing Dragons!

Yattendon Classic Car Day 2022

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Yattendon is a village here in West Berkshire and they have an annual classic car day opening up this very picturesque village to the car community and the general public. The Show is free to attend and free to exhibit. The organisers just ask that you make a contribution which goes to the Thames Valley Air Ambulance and other local charities.

The show had a huge turnout of very diverse vehicles and other transport related exhibits.

This included a really good selection of American vehicles from Mustang’s to military

Click on images for full size view

Studebaker Commander

Very tidy Model T

A varied selection!

A couple of very clean Mustangs

GM Muscle..

GT 40s of varying types

Not a lot of American trucks in attendance, but those there were of very good quality

Henry’s tractor

Hot Rods

Just a sample of the military hardware

Model A selection

Very enjoyable event!

What to keep in mind if you’re thinking about buying a vehicle sight unseen – David Conwill @Hemmings

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Getting a clean ’63 Impala isn’t as easy as it used to be. What if you’re looking at one on the other side of the country

The Hemmings Nation’s collective wisdom is a powerful thing if you comb through it and distill it down. Back in March, Dan Strohl asked, “Have you ever bought a car sight unseen?” and a number of you chimed in with experiences and advice.

The broad consensus was that it’s okay… under certain circumstances. The main advice is to adjust your expectations (and potential offer) to accommodate for the reality that most things look better in a carefully composed photo than in person. Take the words and images of an ad at face value and, more often than not, you’ll end up overpaying.

Responses essentially boiled down to No, Yes, and Yes But, with only one or two commenters offering unqualified yesses, often illustrated with stories that demonstrated extenuating circumstances. The no answers often stemmed from hard-won experience in having purchased one vehicle sight-unseen followed by the gut-wrenching disappointment of having a vehicle delivered that was far worse than expected.

The yes-but answers are probably the most indicative of the realities of the car-buying landscape as a whole. Temporal exigency is one, extreme rarity (Robert Wingerter talked about buying a 1-of-15 Cal-Ace and Joe Essid mentioned that his Project Apollo Buick was an exception for him because they’re so hard to find) is another, as is the hiring of a qualified inspector. There were also a few comments indicating that if the price is right, it’s worth rolling the dice and, in fact, the gamble is part of the fun.

“Sight unseen” is almost no longer a thing, and that is, perhaps, the biggest reality of all. With quality digital photography available virtually everywhere, long-distance transactions happen successfully every day—but it was universally noted that it’s the buyer’s task to demand the correct photos, know what to look for, and know what questions to ask. On top of that, one has to also somehow evaluate the character of the seller to determine if they are being evasive or untruthful in their responses.

Hans1965, from overseas, noted that for foreign buyers there is really no alternative. He’s been burned in the past, he says, but advises, “Be prepared for disappointment, but if you love the car, you get over this and enjoy it…. This is part of the hobby. I have accepted that. The joy to bring an old car back on the road outweighs the pain many times.”

“Even seeing one in person is not a guarantee if you are a bone-head like me,” Joe Essid remarks. Joe purchased a Miata that ticked all the boxes and passed his visual inspection, but found out later via Carfax that he’d purchased a rebuilt wreck—tanking its resale value. Nielen Stander chimes in that Carfax Reports for late models are becoming a standard offering from large-volume dealers and auction houses—though Mark Axen notes that he purchased a late-model pickup with a clean report that still displayed evidence of repairs. “Guess it was minor damage and not reported,” was his surmise.

In that vein, commenter Frog points out that such services are “not a reveal-all.” He prefers to trust his “six senses,” the sixth being common sense, in light of his own experiences. That’s important advice whether looking at a car directly or contemplating one from a distance. It’s probably closest to how I evaluated my own sight-unseen purchase last spring, which turned out to be a great car. Since experience can’t be taught, if you’re looking at your first oldie, it’s good to have the assistance of a knowledgeable friend or club member when evaluating a seller’s representations and photos.

As norm1200 says, “Generally, I don’t advise buying without personally inspecting (or hiring a professional third party), [but] that’s assuming the buyer knows how to reasonably inspect a vehicle.”

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