Category: 1936

1936 Ford Review: Here’s Why Flathead V8 Fords Sold So Well During The Great Depression – Elliott Alvis

1936 Ford Review: Here’s Why Flathead V8 Fords Sold So Well During The Great Depression – Elliott Alvis

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The 1936 Ford Deluxe Sedan was an amazing value for its time. Despite being sold right in the middle of the worst economic crisis in American history, it was still a great selling car. It came standard with a “Flathead” V8, and wasn’t very expensive with a retail price of around $625. Come along as I walk through some of the interesting features of the car, and then take it out for a drive on modern roads.

Ford Once Took A Patent On A Car With The Craziest And Least-Used Car Layout Ever – Jason Torchinsky @Gizmodo

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I’ve had some wonderful opportunities to pester Ford’s archive department for interesting bits of weirdness that may be lurking in their voluminous stacks of records. One of the things I asked the dedicated archivists to look out for would be any rear-engined Ford experiments, and they came up with something really interesting and strange for me to share with all of you, fellow lovers of strange things. Even better, this one has some pretty unexpected Volkswagen Beetle overtones, too, but with a much, much weirder layout.

Of the big three American automakers, Ford may have shown the least interest in rear-engine designs. GM had their Corvairs, Chrysler had all those Simcas they made overseas, but Ford didn’t really mess with back porch engines, even in their European divisions.

But that doesn’t mean they didn’t do some interesting experiments! In the 1930s, streamlined, rear-engine designs were something like electric cars are today—the general consensus was that rear-engined streamliners represented the future, somehow, and lots of people and companies were developing them, or at least experimenting, Ford included.

Read on

 

Full set of Allegheny Ludlum stainless steel-bodied Fords put up for sale by the company that built them – Daniel Strohl @Hemmings

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For decades, Allegheny Ludlum and its successor company have held on to the bulk of the 11 stainless-bodied Ford products that resulted from three different collaborations between the two companies. A source of pride for the company and for the Pittsburgh region in general, it seemed that the cars would forever remain in possession of the specialty metals company. However, in the face of a tough economic climate, Allegheny has decided to sell three of the cars, apparently the first time a complete set of the stainless Fords has ever hit the market.
“We didn’t make the decision lightly,” said Natalie Gillespie, a spokeswoman for Allegheny Technologies Inc. “But we decided it’s only appropriate to utilize every lever we have…as we’re faced with this extraordinary economic challenge.”
Even before the coronavirus pandemic hit, Allegheny started out 2020 downsizing its salaried workforce “to align cost structures to demand levels,” according to its first-quarter shareholders report. With sales down five percent year-over-year and with tougher times ahead due to the pandemic, the company has temporarily idled some of its facilities, cut executive pay by 20 percent, furloughed non-essential workers, and made various other cuts in expenses.
While it didn’t seem like the five stainless Fords that Allegheny had held onto until just recently cost much to keep around – they’d been relegated in recent years from regular parade duty to the occasional car show and recruiting fair – the cars also weren’t doing much for the company’s bottom line. After all, most of its business these days comes from the aerospace, defense, and energy sectors with automotive sales accounting for just 7 percent of its business.

GNRS 2020 – The Battle For The Slonaker Moniker – Dave Cruikshank @RodAuthority

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The big news at the Grand National Roadster Show this year was the rejuvenation of the Al Slonaker Memorial Award. The award is dedicated to the memory of Al and Mary Slonaker, who founded the Grand National Roadster Show in 1949. The Slonaker award is presented to the best non-roadster vehicle at the show each year since 1974. This year, Rod Shows elevated the Slonaker award to the same importance as the AMBR award with a matching $12,500 prize purse thanks to award sponsor ARP. 

The idea of a revamped Slonaker award was for it to achieve parity with AMBR and create a space for almost anything with four wheels to compete for a granddaddy award. One look at the diversity of the cars in this year’s competition shows the goal was largely achieved. Let’s take a look at all the cars that battled it out for the award. Go here for full AMBR coverage. 

Rod Authority was on the ground and we bring you a look at all the Slonaker contenders for 2020.  The winner of this year’s prize is now the big cheese in the custom car world. Take a look!

Splitting Wishbones for a Dropped Axle – Gerry Burger @HotRod

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Splitting Wishbones for a Dropped Axle

In our ongoing series dedicated to resurrecting one 1936 Ford Phaeton (which admittedly has a 1935 body and frame with 1936 front sheetmetal) we have stayed the course of keeping things simple. How simple? Well, we decided to build the car without removing the body. It seems the body has never been separated from the frame and far be it from us to break an 83-year bond. We converted the rear to an open 9-inch Ford with leaf springs, hopped up the 59AB Flathead, and adapted an S-10 five-speed to the motor. Now it was time to attach the front suspension, and in keeping with the simple approach we opted to use one of Super Bell’s new forged, 4-inch dropped axles.

Suspension decisions are a critical part of building any hot rod and we gave ample thought before deciding the buggy spring and bones would work just fine for us. First thought was theme. This car is going to be a very traditional, late-’50s tub with Flathead motor between the rails. This seemed to call for a straight axle suspension. The next consideration was performance. Yes, IFS (independent front suspension) will out- perform a straight axle in ride and handling, and disc brakes are most certainly superior to their drum counterparts

Splitting Wishbones for a Dropped Axle

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Related – Bolt-on Speed and Performance for the Flathead V-8

Truckloads of 1936 Fords Arrive at Holzbaugh’s Detroit Ford Dealership — The Old Motor

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According to the source of today’s lead photo, it was taken in January of 1936 when truckloads of new 1936 Ford cars were being unloaded at George Holzbaugh’s Dealership. The operation was open 24-hours a day and located at West Grand Boulevard and West Fort St. in Detroit, MI, and included a billiards parlor. Holzbaugh…

via Truckloads of 1936 Fords Arrive at Holzbaugh’s Detroit Ford Dealership — The Old Motor

Craig Cole 1936 Ford Flathead V8 Road Trip — No Talking, No Music

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Since my previous video proved to be quite popular, here’s a follow-up! Over the summer I took my old Ford on a long drive to Northern Michigan, just short of 800 miles in total. Here’s a small snippet of the trip. Once again, there’s NO TALKING and NO MUSIC to detract from the engine and exhaust sounds. Like, comment, and most importantly, enjoy!

Ford Flathead V8 @Wikipedia

Related – Craig Cole takes a Sunday drive in his 1936 restored Ford Flathead

Craig Cole takes a Sunday drive in his 1936 restored Ford Flathead

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Craig Cole takes a Sunday drive in his 1936 restored Ford Flathead

Craig Cole takes a Sunday drive in his 1936 restored Ford Flathead

Join me for a little Sunday drive in my completely restored 1936 Ford sedan. Listen to its flathead V8 sing, uninterrupted by talking or music. Aside from a 12-volt electrical system, turn signals, a 1939 transmission, 1937 steering box and slightly later-model engine the car is completely stock, retaining mainstay Ford features of the era like a solid front axle, torque-tube drivetrain, front and rear transverse leaf springs as well as mechanical brakes (with floaters). The car runs and drives beautifully, better than you’d ever expect an 80-plus-year-old vehicle to.

If you’re curious, here are the engine specs: • Factory-relieved 59L block • Stock 59-AB heads • Bored 0.080” beyond 3 3/16” • Stock 3 ¾” crankshaft • 251 cubic inches • Stock intake manifold • Holley 2100 carburetor with stock 8BA jetting and power valve • Stock fuel pump with electric back up • Stock 1946 Ford camshaft with adjustable lifters • Stock “crab-style” distributor • Red’s headers • Dual exhaust system WITHOUT mufflers

Related – 1936 Ford V8 Deluxe Phaeton Was A Six-Year Restoration

1936 Ford @Wikipedia

THREE PENNY – POTEET’S ’36 FORD CROWNED GOODGUYS 2019 BASF AMERICA’S MOST BEAUTIFUL STREET ROD – Damon Lee @FuelCurve

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AMERICA’S MOST BEAUTIFUL STREET ROD 2019

George Poteet is no stranger to the winner’s circle. His vehicles have won just about every honor, award, and accolade imaginable, from Detroit’s Ridler Award, to the Hot Rod Magazine trophy awarded to the fastest car at Bonneville Speed Week. Two titles he has never won before this year, though, are the coveted America’s Most Beautiful Roadster trophy at the Grand National Roadster Show, and the prestigious Goodguys BASF America’s Most Beautiful Street Rod honor. The “Three Penny” 36 Ford roadster built by the team at Pinkee’s Rod Shop earned him the former title in Pomona in January, and this weekend in Pleasanton at the West Coast Nationals the refined roadster beat out four other finalists to take home the Goodguys AMBR crown!

The roadster’s quiet, simple elegance belies the years of labor and magnitude of work involved in bringing it to life – more than 20,000 man hours, according to Pinkee’s owner Eric Peratt. Like so many of today’s top-caliber builds, it’s essentially a coach-built creation, with only a few small areas of original ’36 Ford sheet metal that have been left untouched. It’s still unmistakably a ’36 Ford, though, which was a key objective on the build.

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