Category: 1949

AutoHunter Spotlight: 1949 Ford Custom – Racheal Colbert @ClassicCars.com

AutoHunter Spotlight: 1949 Ford Custom – Racheal Colbert @ClassicCars.com

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Parked on AutoHunter, the online auction platform driven by ClassicCars.com, is this restored 1949 Ford Custom two-door sedan up for auction.

During the Ford’s frame-off restoration, it was repainted in a maroon color, the wiring was replaced and the car was fitted with a new interior

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This Classic 1949 Mercury Custom Is The Perfect Dose Of Nostalgia – Zeeshan Sayed

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We all love a bit of nostalgia, don’t we? Especially if it is a classic from the yesteryears. And every automobile lover has their own favorite classic car. Some adore the likes of Ferrari P4/5 for its rarity while others are admirers of the likes of GTO 250 purely because of the moolah they generate in today’s times.

Almost every big automobile company boasts a super-rich legacy in terms of classic cars. And so is the case with Ford. The American multinational automaker produced a bunch of timeless classics back in the day. And one of its classics was the Mercury Eight – a part of Ford’s Mercury brand that was established to bridge the price gap between Ford and Lincoln models. While the Mercury Eight enjoyed a successful 13-year reign, it is the 1949 Mercury Custom that gets us nostalgic.

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Ford Factory Assembly Line in 1949 – The Flat Spot @YouTube

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After sticking with its well-received previous model through model year 1948, Ford completely redesigned its namesake car for 1949. Save for its drive train, this was an all-new car in every way, with a modern ladder frame now supporting a coil spring suspension in front and longitudinal semi-elliptical springs in back.

The engine was moved forward to make more room in the passenger compartment and the antiquated torque tube was replaced by a modern drive shaft. Ford’s popular 226 CID (3.7 L) L-head straight-6 and 239 CID (3.9 L) Flathead V8 remained, now rated at 90 hp (67 kW) and 100 hp (75 kW), respectively.

The 1949 models debuted at a gala at the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel in New York City in June 1948, with a carousel of the new Fords complemented by a revolving demonstration of the new chassis. The new integrated steel structure was advertised as a “lifeguard body”, and even the woody wagon was steel at heart.

The convertible frame had an “X member” for structural rigidity. From a customer’s perspective, the old Custom, De Luxe, and Super De Luxe lines were replaced by new Standard and Custom trims and the cars gained a modern look with completely integrated rear fenders and just a hint of a fender in front.

The new styling approach was also evident in the 1949 Mercury Eight and the all-new Lincoln Cosmopolitan.

The Flat Spot is here

Here’s What Happened To James Dean’s 1949 Mercury From Rebel Without A Cause – Arun Singh Pundir @HotCars

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Here’s more about the ’49 Mercury from Rebel Without A Cause and where it is now…

The Mercury Eight line was brought forth by Ford’s now-defunct Mercury division; however, the nameplate tasted sweet success between 1939 and 1951.  In 1955, the world mourned the death of the rising star James Dean in an automobile accident. Naturally, when the movie Rebel Without A Cause was released just a month after his demise, it became an instant hit. And James Dean was mourned even more after his acting skills made it apparent that he could have been the next big thing in Hollywood.

Everything Dean touched was gold at the time, so his 1949 Mercury from this very movie became a sensation as well, adopted by the hot-rodding generation with instant ease. Was the Mercury always destined to be a hot rodder hit or did the movie’s success further take it to great heights?

Since time cannot be turned back or altered, we can’t say. Perhaps it was a bit of both, further compounded by Dean’s untimely death. Either way, his 1949 Mercury became a huge hit and has carried on being a classic hot rodder to date.

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If you can find one, a 1949 Kurtis Sport Car may be the most collectible American car of its time – David Conwill @Hemmings

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In 1918, the question asked about the returning doughboys was “How you gonna keep ’em happy down on the farm, after they’ve seen Paree?” A little over a quarter century later, you might have changed the French capital to “MGs,” meaning the little British sports cars, and their more powerful brethren, to which American GIs were introduced when passing through the United Kingdom during World War II.
The demobilized Americans who had experienced the nimble little roadsters of Blighty wanted some of that action for themselves, but U.S. carmakers had little for them in the postwar 1940s—mostly just rehashes of whatever was on the production line in the first months of 1942 when auto manufacturing for the civilian market ceased “for the duration.”
Healeys, Rileys, Talbot-Darracqs, Fiats, and other dashing European cars soon flooded these shores to try to tempt sports car enthusiasts and bring much-needed U.S. currency back to their home countries. More than one American felt that U.S. companies should get a share of the sports car business. One of those was Frank Kurtis, a well-known race-car fabricator and metal craftsman.

This ’49 Plymouth coupe pulls along a camp trailer – Larry Edsall @ClassicCars.com

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Pick of the Day is a vintage coupe, and for $5,000 more, you get the UHaul trailer as well

Pick of the Day is a vintage coupe

If the Pick of the Day captures your attention, you need to know that it comes with more than just the usual challenge of the price its owner expects. The car is a 1949 Plymouth Business Coupe that its private owner is offering for sale on ClassicCars.com for $32,500.

But if you’re willing to cough up another 5 grand, for $37,500 you get not only the Plymouth but a vintage UHaul camping trailer in a matching shade of Solar Yellow paint.

Pick of the Day is a vintage coupe

Read the article here

Related – Salesman’s 1939 Ford coupe

S.C.T.A. Bonneville National Speed Trials – 1949-1968 Collector’s Set

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As a hot rodder, Bonneville is the ultimate destination. For the past seven decades, it’s been known to push man and machine to their limit. Legends are born out on the salt, and now the golden years of Bonneville racing have been compiled into an unbelievable two-book set.

Order from The Rodder’s Journal library here

 

 

 

Seattle Metropolitan Police Museum unveils restored 1949 car at America’s Car Museum – @TacomaWeeklyNews

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Authentic Ford Washington State Patrol car underwent a 5-year frame-off restoration

To celebrate 2019 National Police Week, the Seattle Metropolitan Police Museum took the wraps off a restored, 1949 Ford Washington State Patrol (WSP) Car at America’s Car Museum (ACM) on May 14.

This 1949 WSP Ford “Shoebox” sedan is considered historically significant, as the vehicle is one of the very first “police package” vehicles produced by a manufacturer, coming factory-equipped with a powerful Ford “Flathead” V-8 engine, heavy-duty brakes, 16-inch wheels, a spotlight and a steel reinforcement plate on the roof to accommodate lights or large antennas.

Read the article here

More here at The Columbian

HOMECOMING: A MOTORTREND ICON JOINS THE FAMILY

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The story of the 1949 Kurtis Sport Car, MT’s first-ever cover car

I climb in, twist the key, and press the starter. The Ford flathead V-8 fires up instantly and quickly settles down to a growling idle. I pull the shifter across to the left and back, engaging first gear in the three-speed transmission. Ease out the clutch, and the low, broad-shouldered convertible oozes forward, vintage whitewall tires squirming on the concrete.

Read the rest of the article here

Great Scott! Doc Brown’s Packard convertible comes up for auction – Daniel Strohl @Hemmings

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The De Lorean is, of course, intrinsically linked to the Back to the Future franchise. Aside from its role as the time machine central to each film’s plot, it has that sleek futuristic sci-fi aesthetic essential to the tone of the films. But of the many other vehicles that joined the De Lorean on screen throughout the series, only two made it into all three films, and one of those — Doc Brown’s 1949 Packard Custom Eight Victoria convertible — will head to auction later this month (January 2019)

Read Daniel’s article here