Category: 1954

Henry Ford II’s Ford Monte Carlo Coupe – Clasiq @YouTube

Henry Ford II’s Ford Monte Carlo Coupe – Clasiq @YouTube

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This dark navy car sitting behind Buck is rare… Some may even think that this beautiful flathead car is European, but its not. Its actually a Ford and this particular Ford was not just owned by anyone but was the personal car for Henry Ford II. This Ford is a one-of-one hand built custom on a Facel Vega body built specifically for Henry Ford II. Buck was lucky enough to acquire this car during his first month of work for the Ford Motor Company. bought for just $800.

So here’s how the story goes: Henry the Deuce’s grandfather established Ford of France in 1929. In 1949, Henry II commissioned Italian coach builder Stabilimenti Farina (not Pinin Farina but Pinin’s brother’s company) to design and build a luxurious sports coupe on a Mercury chassis. That Farina Mercury became the prototype for the French Comete (Comet) built by Ford of France with bodywork supplied by Facel Metallon (yes, as in the Facel Vega).

Further information here at Classic Cars.com Journal

Two Ford videos made 40 years apart show how much – and how little – engine manufacturing changed – Daniel Strohl @Hemmings

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From 1954 to 1994, Ford improved its engine casting process in many ways, as we can see from these two Ford-produced videos showcasing the cast-iron engine manufacturing at the Cleveland and Windsor plants, respectively. Computerization! Ergonomic work stations! Conference rooms? A gym?

But once you get past the preambles and the shiny new office furniture in the latter video, you start to see just how unchanged the process remained at its core (get it?). Molten metal still flows into molds; massive machines still bore, hone, grind, and polish raw castings; precision instruments adapted for mass production still ensure tolerances and consistency; line workers still put in long and arduous days.

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1954 Crosley Powered Roadster Proposal Resulted in “Panda”- Monium – @UndiscoveredClassics

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Crosley Powered Roadster Proposal Resulted in “Panda”- Monium
By Robert D. Cunningham

Following Crosley Motor’s 1952 demise, it seemed as if the glut of intrepid entrepreneurs who gave birth to dozens of postwar baby cars was nowhere to be found. Then, Norwegian immigrant Finn S. Hudson stepped forward. Hudson was a mechanical engineer and one of few former Crosley dealers to come up with a viable plan to keep the Crosley dealer network afloat.

In February 1953, he established Small Cars, Inc. in an outlying section of Kansas City, Missouri. His stated purpose was to manufacture and distribute the Panda, a Crosley-based “small utility vehicle” — so described because of the public’s resistance to the term “sports car.” But Hudson’s Panda truly would be a sports roadster powered by the durable Crosley engine.

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Kay Kimes’ Allied Swallow Makes an Appearance on Tom Cotter’s “Barn Find Hunter”

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Hi Gang…

Tom Cotter sure gets around the country in his ultra cool Woody Wagon and uncovers the most amazing finds.  As an author, Tom has continued to pen books on his travels and we’ve been honored to be in several of these over the years (thanks Tom).  And as we shared last year with you, Tom has partnered with Hagerty and has nearly 100 YouTube episodes that you can view on his travels and “finds” throughout the country.  Go get ’em Tom

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The Dan Post Archives: The History of Custom Car Literature – 1944 to 1954 Geoffrey Hacker @undiscoveredclassics.com

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The History of Custom Car Literature, When Did It Start, What Did They Publish, and Why It Was Researched

In  The  Beginning…

Dan Post was the first to document in great detail how to build a custom car in postwar America.  Being “first” is an impressive thing to say – especially when the field of customizing a car was a fledgling enterprise in the mid 1940s and cars to customize were few and far in between.  Remember…during the wartime years new cars weren’t produced and those that were new before the war were treasured commodities.

Cars in the prewar era were mostly designed with open fenders.  Only in the early 1940s and then in the postwar years were the designs “modern” enough to consider customizing cars in many of the ways we think of today.  And it was during this time when Dan Post was there to capture, document and share what he was seeing with America at large.  Dan Post was there at the beginning – writing and learning about what he saw – and sharing it across the country.

The History of Custom Car Literature

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Related – History of Hot Rods & Customs

 

Cemented in history: Entombed 1954 Corvette joins museum’s collection – Larry Edsall @Classiccars.com

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In 1954, Richard Sampson, a successful business owner in Brunswick, Maine, bought a new Chevrolet Corvette.

Cemented in history: Entombed 1954 Corvette

“After driving it for four years, he wanted to park it somewhere safe,” reports the National Corvette Museum in Bowling Green, Kentuck

Cemented in history: Entombed 1954 Corvette

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Related – Through the generosity of donors, the National Corvette Museum hopes to grow its collection

Flathead V-8-Powered 1954 Ford Customline – Hemmings Auction

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Flathead V-8-Powered 1954 Ford Customline

What’s this? A 1954 Ford with a flathead V-8 instead of a Y-block? How can this be? Though Ford discontinued its famed flathead V-8 for the 1954 model year, Canadian-built cars continued with it until the 1955s came out. This handsomely hued Customline Tudor, a mid-range model, was actually built in Canada. So, this car is doubly historic as it represents the final year of the first-generation Customline trim level at Ford, and the final year of flathead production in Canada. Color schemes don’t say “Fifties” more loudly than coral and white, and this Ford’s got them. The seller of this trim Tudor says she’s never driven it in foul weather during her period of ownership, which dates to 2015

See the listing here

Flathead V-8-Powered 1954 Ford Customline

Related – Canadian Flathead Block Identification By Fred Mills

Historic Hill-Climbing Hot Rod From 1954 Lives to Race Today – Jim McCraw @HotRod

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If you’re old enough, you may have seen this car before, perhaps when it was featured in the July 1958 issue of HOT ROD. Since then, the hot rod hill climber originally built by Bob Davis of Boone, North Carolina, has been a few places. Now it’s back, completely restored and updated to modern specs for hot rodding, hill climbing, and vintage road racing.

After that, though, the car spent more than 25 years in a junkyard in Waynesville, North Carolina, rusting away until vintage sports car enthusiast Jimmy Dobbs of Memphis rescued it from obscurity in 1992. The cost of restoration was so high that Dobbs sold the car to Chuck Rahn, a talented fabricator based in Phoenix. Rahn attempted to sell it to Jim Herlinger, who owned a similar car, the Baldwin Special, in northern California. Herlinger passed, but called a friend of his in Michigan to tell him about the car.

Read the rest of the article here

After the Flathead the Ford Y-Block V8 Engine

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The Ford Y Block V8

 

The venerable hot rodders favourite Ford Flathead V8 reached the end of it’s life, (at least in the States :)), in 1953 and it was followed up by the introduction of the Y Block OHV V8 in 1954.

The Y Blocks came in 239, 256 cubic inch variants for 1954, for 1955 272 and 292 cubic inch units were added.

In 1956 the 312 cubic inch motor was added to the range, this engine family ran until 1964 when it was replaced by the Windsor and Cleveland V8’s

For a really good detailed look at the Y Block V8 and where it was utilised you can read here at the motor-car.co.uk website.