Category: 1967

After 45 Years, a 1967 Shelby G.T. 500 Is Transformed From a Racer Into a Show Winner – David Conwill @Hemmings

After 45 Years, a 1967 Shelby G.T. 500 Is Transformed From a Racer Into a Show Winner – David Conwill @Hemmings

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If you pay under $100,000 for an authentic 1967 Shelby G.T. 500 these days, you’re doing pretty well. It’s not at all uncommon for nice examples to tickle the quarter-million mark at auction. Rare and exclusive to begin with, Shelbys have only gone up in value as the young men and women who wanted one when they were new have now reached the peak of their disposable income and free time. A Shelby like this was the dream of every Fordophile teen in the late ’60s, but they only built 2,050 of them, so they’ve always been an exclusive car.

Not every 17-year-old in 1967 could own a new Shelby G.T. 500, either, but John Briggs could. That’s because his mother, Mitzi Stauffer Briggs, was an heir to the Stauffer Chemical fortune and could easily afford the $4,714.67 sticker price. His father, also named John, had flown fighter planes during World War II. Perhaps unsurprising, then, that the big-block pony car seemed a perfect fit for the teenager with both money and a taste for high performance. Maybe it was, as that teen went on to become an adult who regularly competed in the Formula 2, Formula 5000, Formula Atlantic, and Can-Am racing series before his untimely death from leukemia at age 46 in 1996.

G.T. 500 was a lot of car for any driver, thanks in large part to the 355-hp, 428-cu.in. “Cobra Le Mans” V-8 — an FE-series big-block topped with two four-barrel carburetors. The ’500 only became possible for the 1967 model year because Ford had widened the engine bay in the Mustang to accommodate the FE-series 390 in its GT models. Shelby recognized immediately that where a 390 fit, so would go a 427 or 428. The milder, more streetable 428 got the nod for all but three special 427 powered 1967 GT500s that left Shelby American.

Based on casting dates, this seems to be the original 428. The first owner raced it and the car still wore period speed parts when restoration began. Luckily, most of the factory gear was still with the car

As a part of the package, Shelby also included additional cooling, a suspension beefed up for handling, a special steering wheel, a deluxe interior, an integrated roll bar, a remote mirror, a tach, and additional gauges to monitor oil pressure and amps. The G.T. 500 also included power steering, power disc brakes, shoulder belts, a radio, and a fold-down rear seat. The four-speed was a no-cost option and California emissions equipment was mandatory.

Right off the lot, Car and Driver discovered a G.T. 500 was capable of 0 to 60 mph in 6.5 seconds and a quarter-mile run in just 15 seconds at 95 mph. Box stock, it was a highly capable machine and a flourishing aftermarket existed to make any muscle car even more muscular.

Despite its impressive equipment list and the current desirability of all things Shelby, young John didn’t keep his G.T. 500 long, selling it to the family gardener, Joe Tanouye, for $1,500 in August 1969. In the two years he owned it, however, John made extensive use of the car, road racing it at Laguna Seca (now WeatherTech Raceway Laguna Seca) and drag racing it. He also took advantage of many aftermarket parts for his Shelbyized pony car

A “For Sale” sign discovered in the Shelby during disassembly boasted that the car was capable of accelerating from 0 to 120 mph in 12.5 seconds, thanks to over $6,000 in modifications, including Traction Master bars, an Isky Racing camshaft kit, headers by Doug [Thorley], 4.11 gears, Super-Duty Monroe load-leveler rear shocks, a Hurst shifter, American Racing mag wheels, Goodyear tires (inside rear-wheel arches radiused to accommodate slicks), and a magneto with dual coils. The sign also suggested that the interior had been gutted, though it was included in the sale.

What was missing was the entirety of the California emissions equipment, which prevented Tanouye from ever registering the car for road use during his ownership. Instead, it sat on a paved slab behind his house in Redwood City, California, until 2014. Joe Tanouye had died in 2012 and his son, Nick, put the car up for sale. It was spotted by Ward Gappa, of Quality Muscle Car Restorations LLC, in Scottsdale, Arizona.

Ward was impressed with the completeness and low mileage of the old Shelby and acquired it to restore, although it had been “beat to death in its first two years.” That decision was bolstered by the lack of rust and early ownership history, making it what Ward felt was a “good investment.”

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HELP: MYSTERY SHELBY MUSTANG!! – Dennis Collins Coffewalk

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Welcome to Coffee Walk Ep. 180! There’s no better way to kick off a new year than with an OUTSTANDING 1967 Mustang GT350 Shelby! The only catch is, we don’t know the full history of it! We need your help finding out how this Shelby got here! Please email any information or video to Social@CBJeep.com

A 15-Year Project Culminates in a 1967 Pontiac GTO Equipped Just How Its Owner Would Have Ordered It – Thomas A. DeMauro @Hemmings

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“I think the 1967 GTO is one of the most iconic muscle cars of the ’60s,” Jake Stossel of Ebensburg, Pennsylvania, asserts. Shortly after purchasing this example in August 2005, the then-28-year-old electrician began planning out his project, but he soon arrived at that fork in the road where it was time to choose between “Factory-Equipped” and “How I Really Want It.”

After negotiating with a nearby seller for two weeks, who wanted to move a 1968 GTO out of his collection of restorables instead of the ’67, Jake was certainly grateful to have snared this Goat, yet there were a few lingering issues. The Pontiac was Signet Gold, but he didn’t really like gold. It didn’t have a Cordova top, but he wanted one for it. It was fitted with the standard 335-hp 400-cu.in. engine, but he preferred the 360-hp 400 H.O. It had the Turbo 400 automatic, but he wanted a Muncie four-speed. You get the picture

Nevertheless, like most of us, Jake didn’t possess unlimited funds, so he had to settle. Or did he? Rather than be forever haunted by what could have been, he instead decided to deviate from the original equipment path and build this Pontiac how he would have ordered it in 1967

.Based on input from his wife, Lindy, he decided to paint the Goat Linden Green, his friend Matt Lamer suggested changing the black Morrokide interior to Parchment, and Jake specified a black Cordova top. The resulting trinity of contrasting hues heighten the visual appeal of an already arresting body design. And, each of those choices were readily available for 1967. Regarding the mechanical aspects of the build, Jake used factory-issued or reproduction components for the majority of the upgrades. Thus, the GTO retains a primarily stock appearance.

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How did this RARE MUSCLE CAR end up HERE?! – @DennisCollins Coffee Walk

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Another excellent find from Dennis and the team

Welcome to Coffee Walk Ep. 152! This past week we took off from the shop in Wylie, Texas and set out for a 1,000 mile one-day round-trip up to Alton, Missouri to rescue a 1967 Mustang that is said to be in the most desirable color with the two most sought after mechanical options. How in the world did that car end up here?! Well sit back, grab your cup of joe and give it a watch to find out!

“Batman”: The ’67 Holman-Moody Mustang that was smuggled in boxes, raced, and restored to glory – Colin Comer @Hagerty

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Imagine, if you will, taking your significant other’s daily driver from them, smuggling it off to another country to be turned into a race car, smuggling it back disassembled in crates, assembling it, proceeding to race it competitively under a pseudonym (so your father wouldn’t find out) … and living to tell the tale.

Insanity, right? Well for Cristobal Galjuf of Lima, Peru in the early 1970s, it was reality. Incredible as it may seem, Galjuf, his marriage, and his relationship with his father survived the whole ordeal.

Thankfully for us, the other part of the story that survives today is the car at the center this tale—a 1967 Ford Mustang modified by Holman & Moody. And soon it will be offered at Mecum’s Glendale, Arizona auction (Lot S155) on March 20.

By 1971, Galjuf had for a while been road racing Mustangs in various events in Peru, at which point turned his attention to building a serious, purpose-built race car. His wife was daily-driving a 1967 Ford Mustang Coupe, built at the very Peru factory in which she worked, that he had purchased for her new. The logic behind taking this plain-jane four-year-old Mustang and turning it into a no-holds-barred road racer may be lost to time, but what’s for certain is that Galjuf decided Holman & Moody was the shop for the job.

Holman & Moody’s home in Charlotte, North Carolina, was, well, 3200 miles away and in America. Add in the wrinkle that Peru was under military dictatorship at the time and Charlotte might as well have been on the moon. Where there is a will, however, and a big enough budget, there is a way. Galjuf found a means of sneaking the car out of Peru.

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At nearly 300,000 miles, this 1967 Cutlass Supreme convertible is still driven daily by its original owner -Thomas A. DeMauro @Hemmings

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Imagine the level of commitment required to retain the only new car you’ve ever purchased as your primary transportation for the rest of your life.

Connie Milburn of Maple Ridge, British Columbia, Canada, is doing just that with her 1967 Cutlass Supreme convertible, which she named “Black Beauty.”She tells Hemmings, “I’m just an average product from the small provincial farming community of Edson, Alberta. While growing up on the farm with my parents [Ruby and Orlando Thompson] and my brother [Orley], I learned how to do many things at a young age. Dad taught us how to drive a tractor as soon as our feet could reach the pedals.

He reasoned that since we didn’t have a telephone, if anything happened to him or Mom, my brother or I would have to go get help.”By 1962, Connie was in her early 20s and a flight attendant for Trans Canada airlines, the predecessor to Air Canada. She decided to take a three-month sabbatical in Europe and recalls, “My parents were driving me to the airport when we passed Edmonton Motors and I saw a 1962 F-85 convertible in the showroom.

I said, ‘Dad, I just saw a car I love’ and he replied, ‘Are we taking you to the airport or the car dealer?’ I said, ‘The airport,’ but I still couldn’t get that Oldsmobile out of mind. I told myself I’d own one by the time I was 30.”

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California Special Mustang: Definitive History Of Ford’s West Coast Cruiser – Brett Foote @FordAuthority

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There have been many special edition Ford Mustangs over the years, from the Mach 1 to the Boss 302 and everything in between. One such package that doesn’t get quite as much attention, however, is the California Special Mustang. But its story is a fascinating one, and one well worth revisiting in depth.

It all started back in 1967 and 1968, when Ford dealers in California sold more new Mustangs than any other state. To commemorate this achievement, Ford decided to come up with a special model. To do this, it collaborated with Shelby to build upon the 1967 Shelby GT500 prototype called “Little Red,” which led to the creation of the 1968 Mustang GT/CS California Special.

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My Classic Car taught me that we are stewards preserving for future generations – @ClassicCar.com

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My wife and I bought our 1967 Corvair Monza convertible from the estate of the second owner. The car was being sold by the mechanic on behalf of the wife who was selling all of the her deceased husband’s cars.

The mechanic put me in touch with John, the original owner, who bought the car new in 1967 and he gave me the full history on the car over his 45-year ownership. He bought the car right after he married his wife.

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Video: Roger Penske for Sunoco Gasoline, 1967 – Mac’s Motor City Garage

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Here’s a very young and dapper Roger Penske from 1967 to sell you some custom-blended Sunoco gasoline.

Roger Penske didn’t invent corporate sponsorship in auto racing, of course. But it was Penske who, as much as any single person, elevated it into an art form and perfected it as a science. Before Penske, racing was, for many, a fun game played with other people’s money. But with his unbending professionalism and competitive drive, Penske changed the game. He helped to turn racing into a legitimate industry, where sponsors received a measurable return on their investment and racers could earn a dependable living.

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Mustang What’s the differences between early and late 1967 Mustangs? @Classic Nation

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If you’ve got a 1967 Mustang, it likely that you’ve seen parts catalogs make a distinction between early and late production models. Several things about the 67 Mustang changed during the course of the year. In this video, I’ll show you the parts that are different, and how to spot those differences.

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