Category: 1970

WATCH THIS: Trans Am on Super 8 – Mike Austin @Hemmings

WATCH THIS: Trans Am on Super 8 – Mike Austin @Hemmings

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Vintage Racing

Maybe it’s from spending a week at the Scottsdale Auctions and seeing every shade of muscle car just sitting all too pretty, but we’ve got a hankering to see what it was like when these were the main attraction at road courses across America every weekend. Ask, and YouTube will deliver. This vintage Super 8 footage has everything but the soundtrack

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Dodge celebrates Challenger’s 50th birthday with ‘Gold School’ option – Larry Edsall @ClassicCars.com

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Flexing its muscles, Dodge describes the coupe as ’50 years and zero chance of growing up’

Challenger’s 50th birthday

Ford had its Mustang and Mercury its Cougar. Chevrolet had the Camaro and Pontiac the Firebird. American Motors doubled up with the Javelin and AMX. Why, even Plymouth had the Barracuda.

But until 1970, Dodge had nothing to compete in the pony car category that had become so popular with the Baby Boomers who were just getting their driving licenses and were causing a generational shift in the American automotive marketplace.

But with Chrysler redoing its E-body chassis for the 1970 model year, Dodge finally would have its own challenger in the pony car category, a vehicle quite aptly named the Challenger

Challenger’s 50th birthday

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Related – Watch The Last Dodge Challenger SRT Demon Roll Off The Assembly Line

The only thing that can top a Chevelle is Stevie Nicks on top of one – Dan Stoner @Hemmings

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The only thing that can top a Chevelle is Stevie Nicks on top of one

It’s an undisputed truth that Rock-N-Roll and muscle cars go together like Dazed and Confused. One of the first things we always seem to do, after plunking down the cake for the car we buy – whether it’s a certified muscle car or some wheezy 2-door we foist our dreams of glory upon – is a stereo. After all, what’s the point of putting air in those Hi-Jackers in the rear if you can’t bust out the Motörhead jams up front, right?

The only thing that can top a Chevelle is Stevie Nicks on top of one

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Related – Larry’s Big Day with Unknown Rock Star

Related – American Modern Insurance “The Build”

Buyer’s Guide: 1970 Chevrolet El Camino SS – Mike McNessor @Hemmings

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A big-block-powered hybrid hauler examined

El Caminos have taken a beating on the internet over the past 20 years as a lazy punchline for mullet jokes. But we wonder: How many snarky car pundits have ever actually driven a big-block powered El Camino? They’d likely be impressed by the power—even on a short trip to the coffee bar to write that day’s clickbait listicle. When the chassis is in good condition, 1968-’72 El Caminos aren’t a chore to drive, either. They have surprisingly modern road manners.

Not that we’re biased or hold grudges, but just to be clear, in SS trim, an El Camino is not the automotive equivalent of a mullet. (All business in the front and a party in the back! Ha!) It’s actually all business in the back where you can haul stuff (repair parts for cars favored by bloggers, for instance), and a party in the front, where the gas pedal and Mark IV engine coexist in tire-burning harmony.

As of this writing, we counted more than two dozen 1970 El Caminos on Hemmings.com awaiting adoption. Prices ranged from $5,200 for a roller/project with new quarters (and an owner-described “cheap paint job”) up to $55,000 for what appeared to be a show-ready SS 396. Literally something for every budget.

Read the guide here

Buyer’s Guide: 1970 Chevrolet El Camino SS – Mike McNessor @Hemmings

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A big-block-powered hybrid hauler examined

El Caminos have taken a beating on the internet over the past 20 years as a lazy punchline for mullet jokes. But we wonder: How many snarky car pundits have ever actually driven a big-block powered El Camino? They’d likely be impressed by the power—even on a short trip to the coffee bar to write that day’s clickbait listicle. When the chassis is in good condition, 1968-’72 El Caminos aren’t a chore to drive, either. They have surprisingly modern road manners.

Not that we’re biased or hold grudges, but just to be clear, in SS trim, an El Camino is not the automotive equivalent of a mullet. (All business in the front and a party in the back! Ha!) It’s actually all business in the back where you can haul stuff (repair parts for cars favored by bloggers, for instance), and a party in the front, where the gas pedal and Mark IV engine coexist in tire-burning harmony.

Read the article here

The Humbler: 1970 GTO’s vacuum-operated exhaust was ahead of its time – Mike Bumbeck @Hagerty

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At the peak of the muscle car era, the 1970 Pontiac GTO offered an innovative driver-controlled exhaust that boosted performance—and ruffled feathers.

The Vacuum Operated Exhaust (VOE), initiated by a stealthy pull on a dash-mounted control, activated flaps on both mufflers that bypassed the stock exhaust routing and opened the gates to twice the sound and improved air flow. In concert with the Pontiac Ram Air induction system, the VOE delivered additional, measurable power. But it was pulled from the options list almost immediately as GM conformed to legal requirements in several states. (That was the official reason anyway. Unofficially, it was doomed by internal politics).

Read the rest of the article here

1937 Samco Cord Replica – @Hemmings

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Seller’s Description:

Here is another of our popular 1937 Cord replicas. this one is also factory built by Samco in 1970 & is the Warrior model, 302 V8 Ford, automatic, Power Brakes & Steering, rear jump seat, like new tan top, rich red interior, luggage rack with rear spare, CD player, suicide doors, 1 piece body, & now 48 years old!! 220HP, heater etc.

This is one of the coolest looking replicas ever built. 1937 Cord that was factory built in 1970 by Sports Automobile Maufacturing Company in Tulsa, Oklahoma- SAMCO & the model is the Warrior, & our other one listed in the Royale. has the famous Coffin Nose grille, front & rear Cord bumpers, & still powered by the peppy 220 HP Ford 5.0 liter 302 V8 engine with the 3 speed C4 automatic transmission, Power brakes & Power steering, heater. Just rebuilt the carburetor, new plugs, points ,cap etc. Thick suicide doors with lift out side windows, rear jump seat, like new tan top, & titled as a 1970 Cord, rich red interior, side supercharger pipes, luggage rack with rear spare tire, Michelin radials, Cord front emblem, new CD player just installed, full tilt up front end for easy engine access, chrome air cleaner & custom valve covers, very clean engine area, 1 piece body, 2900 pounds with 108″ wheelbase, wood grain dash with custom steering wheel, 3 rear view mirrors, seat belts, 6 black face classic styled gauges, tinted glass, 2 piece windshield, & showing 43,000 miles in 48 years!! paint is peeling in some areas, & tach isn’t working right, runs & drives great, has a clean Florida tile in Bobs Classics Inc. name. and being 48 years old now, its actually a classic, even being a replica, & exempt from all emissions, & eligible for antique tags in most states. only 400 cars were ever built from 1968 to 1970. Vin# is 099W1127F a lot of car for only $22,900.!! that’s all $22,900.!! we can ship it to your door, by enclosed, insured, truck carrier, & we also ship almost anywhere in the world by enclosed ship containers. a lot of fun for the bucks!!

See the listing here

The last Buick Wildcats are bargain muscle cruisers – Brandan Gillogly @Hagerty

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Earlier this year, we mentioned that the collector car market had finally caught on to the boat tail Buick Riviera. Today, we’re highlighting another big, bad Buick, but this time it’s one we feel is underrated, the 1969–70 Buick Wildcat

Read the rest of Brandan’s article here

 

 

Should You Buy A Flood Damaged Car?

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With all the recent climate issues across the US the subject of flood damaged cars has again come to the fore.

These cars will of course include a good percentage of classic cars damaged in this way.

Are these cars a good buy?

The Hemmings Classic Car Radio Podcast Episode 154 has a good discussion regarding the pros and cons of a purchase

Another good point of reference is the article that can be found here on How Stuff Works

Conversely if you want to avoid a car damaged in this way take a read of the article How to avoid a ‘Hurricane Car’ also on How Stuff Works

My thoughts on it are if you are very brave and can get a fresh water car that’s no newer than the early seventies at a good price then have at it!

Anything newer will be most likely be plagued by all manner of electrical issues amongst other things.

If however you are willing to accept the challenge you can get a bargain such as the Camaro pictured above which is up for auction here at Hemmings

 

Jeep Builds a Muscle Car – 1970 XJ-001 The awesome XJ-001 – Pat Foster @Hemmings

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Well this one was a realk surprise for me and I have to say I kind of like it for it’s weirdness.

The Jeep XJ-001 was a one off styling exercise from 1970

The reason we call it a Jeep muscle car is because, although it was built on the small CJ-5 chassis-which at the time offered only a 225-cu.in. V-6 as its biggest engine-the Jeep concept sportster was going to be motivated by good old American V-8 muscle. And not the 304-cu.in. V-8 that later was available in CJs. No, this special Jeep was motivated by a gutsy and powerful 360-cu.in. AMC V-8. Talk about absolute power! The choice of an AMC V-8 was not all that unusual because Jeep had been buying V-8 engines from American Motors since 1964.

Read Pat Fosters story of the XJ-001 here at Hemmings