Category: 1978

Unrestored 1978 Dodge Challenger Features the Plaidest Interior That Ever Plaided – Daniel Strohl @Hemmings

Unrestored 1978 Dodge Challenger Features the Plaidest Interior That Ever Plaided – Daniel Strohl @Hemmings

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It’ll be tough to find another car quite like this 1978 Dodge Challenger listed for sale on Hemmings.com. Granted, it would be tough to find another running 1978 Dodge Challenger at all, let alone one that hasn’t succumbed to rust and neglect. But to find one still wearing its sundown stripes and with an interior positively covered in plaid, well, that’s rare. The paint looks tired, and there’s some damage around the taillamps that needs attention, but the car is unmodified and has a five-speed. From the seller’s description:

Completely original and left untouched, hopping in this Challenger is like stepping back in time. With a 2.6 liter engine and 5 speed, manual transmission, this car runs and drives like it just came off the lot in 1979. It passed our driving test with flying colors and would absolutely make an excellent daily driver. The body is in good shape, with no major damage or rust. There are some slight scuffs on the driver side, rear fender (see pictures) but that’s about it. Original orange paint, stripes and top are all in solid condition. The trunk space is clean and dry. It even comes with a spare tire! The upholstery inside is as cool as it gets. Plaid on the door panels and seats looks awesome. Slight weather wear in the backseat is all in this otherwise nearly flawless interior. Original overhead console is still functional, the original am-fm radio still works great too. This is a mechanically sound car that is ready for anything.

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The Pontiac Grand Safari was a flagship station wagon hauling on in an era of downsizing – Matt Litwin @Hemmings

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By 1974, 5,000-plus-pound family cars were suddenly as impractical as the ol’ muscle car had been to newlyweds holding a freshly printed mortgage and a newborn baby just a few years earlier. Detuned as they were, the large-displacement—still a prevalent means of motivation within the market segment-remained incredibly thirsty. As a result, Pontiac’s full-size output fell to just under 145,500 cars in 1975, and only 137,216 were sold a year later.

Suffice it to say, Detroit needed a diet, and the automakers knew it well in advance thanks in large part to looming federal mandates. At GM, the first to be first slimmed down were the 1977 model-year full-size cars. Among them was Pontiac’s flagship station wagon—the Grand Safari.

The downsized wagon’s chassis was reduced from 127 inches to a svelte 115.9 inches. Much of the basic architecture, however, carried over from the previous generation: independent coil spring front suspension, rear leaf-sprung suspension, power steering, and power front disc brakes. Also included as a standard were FR78-15 radial tires that provided sure-footed control in all driving conditions.

The redesigned chassis cradled an equally new 5.0-liter (301-cu.in.) V-8 engine. It was more than the division’s new “economy” powerplant; rated for a rather capable 135 horsepower, the block, crankshaft, cylinder heads, and intake manifold—collectively—weighed 136 pounds less than the 350-cu.in. V-8. Factory literature touted the availability of a “new 6.6 litre (400/403 CID) V-8” on the Grand Safari’s option chart—technically a carryover engine revamped for ’77—that was rated for 180 or 200 hp. Californians could have opted for the 170-hp 350. A Turbo Hydra-Matic automatic was the only transmission available.

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Even the malaise-era Chevy Corvette is still fun to drive, and value-priced – David Conwill @Hemmings

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What’s the cheapest Corvette? It’s definitely not 1953 or ’54. The low book value on those doesn’t fall much under $45,000. How about 1958, with its exuberant use of trim? It has an average retail value of nearly $51,000, so probably not. Perhaps a 1965 roadster with a carbureted small-block and an automatic? That’s still $51,500.

Prices for the early third-generation cars (“C3” to most enthusiasts) continue to trail their older siblings. A ’68 Stingray roadster has a book value of $41,800, and the coupe is only $6,700 less. Fast forward a decade, however, and some of the sting had gone out of the Stingray: Big-block engines went away after 1974, the roadster was dropped after 1975, and the Stingray name itself was last seen on a Corvette in 1976 (at least until the C7 model debuted in 2014).

The 1978 Corvette was a heavily restyled car, thanks especially to its large rear greenhouse—somewhat recalling the 1963-’67 coupes. Nevertheless, it’s still recognizably the body that arrived 10 years earlier. The similarities notwithstanding, these days the average ’78 doesn’t quite garner $14,500.

Now, in fairness, 1978 isn’t actually the cheapest third-generation Corvette. For some reason, 1976 holds that distinction—your basic Bicentennial Corvette has an average value of only $12,800. Also, the equipment and condition make all the difference: The aluminum wheels and air conditioning on our feature car, owned by Mike Richards of Peoria, Arizona, bump the average retail up by another $2,000, but it’s still an affordable car by any standard.

It’s also a capable car—despite being from the heart of the much-maligned 1973-’83 “malaise era,” when manufacturers were still struggling to catch up with emissions and safety mandates. At the time, people (mostly automotive journalists) looked down their noses at GM for keeping the basic Corvette chassis in production from 1963. The suspension architecture actually lasted right through the 1982 model year, giving General Motors plenty of time to refine it for whatever purpose it was used. Also, this is a classic car magazine, so when have vintage components ever scared us?

The third-generation Corvette’s 1960s heritage means it can be (and frequently was) turned into a capable mount for competitive road racing. The platform’s use during the brougham period of the 1970s means that it’s also capable of a more luxurious, grand-tourer type of ride. Funny folks called these disco-era ’Vettes “two-seat Buicks,” but ask yourself how much flat-out road racing you do in your muscle car, versus the amount of highway driving.

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Mustang II with a fascinating history – Larry Edsall @ClassicCars.com

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Sometimes collector cars are bought simply because of their rarity and value. But sometimes they are bought because of their story. For example, Jay Leno says he doesn’t buy cars, he buys stories.

The Pick of the Day is a car with a story. The car is a 1978 Ford Mustang II, certainly not widely to be considered a collector car even if there is a small cult out there of loyalists.

But here’s the story, as shared by the private seller in Romney, West Virginia, advertising the car on ClassicCars.com:

“This Mustang II is as close to perfect as a 42 year old car can be,” the seller reports. “It has the V-6, power steering and brakes, automatic transmission, AM-FM radio, and some décor option that included the white band around the bottom with a blackout grill.”

The seller adds that the car has been driven only 4,800 miles since new, and that’s part of the car’s story.

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We don’t know where’s the beef, but here’s the car – Larry Edsall @ClassicCars.com

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We don’t know where’s the beef, but here’s the car

Pick of the Day was special ordered by Wendy’s founder Dave Thomas

You don’t have to be the owner of a Wendy’s restaurant franchise to want to buy the Pick of the Day, but it might help. The car is a 1978 Glassic roadster done in the style of a 1929 Ford Model A and was specially ordered by Wendy’s founder Dave Thomas, according to the Volo, Illinois, dealer advertising the car on ClassicCars.com.

“Dave custom ordered this factory-built 1978 Glassic roadster to suit his specific needs, which was an eye-catching paint scheme using the colors from the Wendy’s logos,” the dealer says. 

“Most of the Glassics were equipped with a 4 cyl and no options, Dave ordered this one with a 302, power steering, brakes and an automatic transmission.

Read the article here

We don’t know where’s the beef, but here’s the car

Related – Easy A – 1980 Shay Super Deluxe Roadster

Drag Racing Blackbushe Airport UK 1963 – 65 – Jive Bomber @TheJalopyJournal and Bonus Bob Dylan Trivia

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Some great footage of drag racing at Blackbushe Airport back in the 60’s, located by Jive Bomber this is of an interest to me as I live quite nearby.

The article is here

The video footage can be found below

The airport also hosted a huge Bob Dylan concert in 1978. A local DJ who ended up becoming quite well known on the BBC famously stated that he would “eat his hat” if Mr Dylan actually ever performed at the venue. This particular DJ guested at an event prior to the concert where I was providing the music with my mobile disco. We offered him a hat, you can imagine his response!

 

Hemmings Find of the Day – 1978 Ford Mustang II

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The much maligned and misunderstood Mustang II is becoming a rare sight these days.

A clean example is currently for sale here on Hemmings

Seller’s Description:

1978 Ford Mustang II, Cobra II, This car is a meticulously clean, well preserved and well maintained car that is driven regularly to car shows or even to get the groceries. There is no rust anywhere and everything works including the A/C and 8 track tape player. I have owned this car since 2011. So, if you are a Mustang II fan, I believe this car is for you. 1 of 11 according to its Marti Report, This 1978 Ford Mustang II Cobra II has the optional 302 CID V8, automatic transmission, PS, PB, A/C and AM/FM 8-Track Player. The engine bay was detailed and all suspension components were replaced in 2012. Only about 12,000 miles since. Recently replaced the original urethane bumpers and front spoiler with lightweight, fiberglass reproductions. Many extra parts including original Cobra II rims and the original bumpers. My desire is to sell this car to someone who will appreciate it for what it is. No low bidders.

C10 Nation, Yellowstone and the One That Got Away

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I started listening to Ronnie Wetch’s C10 Talk Podcast a while back and it’s very informative and enjoyable.

As a result I looked up Ronnie’s brilliant custom 1973 C20 Cheyenne Super 3+3 crew cab long bed, with the camper installed this thing is enormous!

1973 C20 Cheyenne Super 3+3 crew cab long bed

There is a great article on the truck here from the RideTech website here

All this stuff reminds me of a few years ago when we were visiting Country Classics in Staunton IL during one of our US visits, as you can see the truck was really nice and the price probably even nicer at $5950! Sadly I didn’t pull the trigger….

As you can also see there was a nice red 78 Silverado at $9350

 

Shay, Pray and the Replica Car Movement Part 1

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Back in the late 70’s and early 80’s replicas of famous classics became popular for a brief period in the States

Two of the prime movers were Harry Shay and Glenn Pray.

Harry’s company created replicas of the Ford Model A and Thunderbird under licence from Ford and sold via the Ford dealer network.

Between 1979 and 1980 Harry’s company produced 2000 Shay Roadsters, by 1982 Harry’s company had filed for bankruptcy when it was declared that 5000 Roadsters and 200 Thunderbirds had been produced.

After the bankruptcy a company named Camelot took over the production of the former Shay models, however they too eventually went out of business.

Between 1982 until 1993 Speedway Motors sold an identical product in kit form called the Modern A

You can read the full story in more detail here