Category: Auction

Attending a car auction isn’t just for buyers and sellers – Bob Palma @Hemmings

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Have you attended a collector-car auction? Admittedly, only religion and politics are likely to stimulate more spirited conversations than collector-car auctions. Hobbyists generally describe the auction/hobby relationship with one of two four letter words: boon or bane. May I suggest other possibilities?

In the spirit of full disclosure, I’ve attended many collector-car auctions, but never bought or sold a car at any of them. Nonetheless, at least four good, alternate reasons for attending came to mind at the 2021 Indianapolis Mecum Spring Classic Auction.

1. An opportunity to see cars (or trucks, etc.) you’ll likely never see anywhere else due to the distance involved, like having a mini-Hershey in your backyard… or at least closer than central Pennsylvania. Many of us rarely travel outside maybe a 200-mile radius from home to attend collector-car events, so we often see the same cars repeatedly.

At a collector-car auction, however, cars will be shipped in from everywhere. So, there’s a good chance of seeing a “one-of-a-kind,” like Parnelli Jones’ 1969 Big Oly Baja-winning Bronco…or a rarity like one of the 117 1957 Dual Ghia convertibles produced. Both were offered at the 2021 Indianapolis Mecum sale.

A bidder planning to attend the 2017 Indianapolis Mecum Auction was interested in a 1960 Studebaker Lark V-8 convertible on the sale bill. He contacted me, as technical editor of The Studebaker Drivers Club, to arrange to meet him at the car before it went through, and to apprise him of its condition. I told him it might be the best one in the country. I wasn’t kidding; it was mostly original and a real sweetheart. He subsequently bought it at the auction and it disappeared over the eastern horizon, where I may never see it again

2. Another opportunity is to look at available cars similar to your own, examine them, and note their selling prices…or, if they don’t sell, note the high bid tendered. While this won’t tell you what your car is “worth” (always a nebulous discussion), it might help you decide if yours is underinsured.

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The winningest Shelby on record – a 1965 G.T.350R – is scheduled to cross the auction block – Matt Litwin @Hemmings

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Serial number SFM5R538 is confirmed as one of just 34 “production” G.T.350R models built by Shelby American in 1965 for racing, which then became the winningest Shelby of any kind on record. All images courtesy of Mecum Auctions.

There are Mustangs, and then there are Shelby Mustangs. But even within that rarified subset of Ford’s pony car, there are special examples that stand out among the herd, such as the car pictured above: A 1965 Shelby G.T.350R that is almost certainly the winningest Shelby of any type ever created. It’s one of many vehicles of special distinction going up for sale during this year’s Monterey Car Week – simply known as either Monterey among vintage vehicle enthusiasts, or Pebble Beach due to the renowned concours d’elegance that anchors the festivities. This particular car will be presented to bidders by Wisconsin-based Mecum Auctions at the company’s usual Monterey location, at the Hyatt Regency Hotel and Spa – Del Monte Golf Course.

Like most early Shelby-built Mustangs, this one is known by its serial number, SFM5R538. Shelby American Automobile Club (SAAC) documents confirmed that its legacy began as an order from Shelby American to Ford Motor Company in March 1965. The basic Mustang’s construction commenced at the San Jose assembly line the following month. Delivered first to the Shelby team, it was assigned Work Order No. 17535, which converted the early pony into a G.T.350R, a process that stretched nearly six months

The conversion to race-ready B/Production trim meant this G.T.350R was equipped with an independent front suspension, with adjustable coil springs and front disc brakes, as well as a live-axle rear suspension with leaf springs. Cooling for the all-important brake system was achieved in part by a special fiberglass front body apron and rear ductwork. A set of American Racing magnesium Torq Thrust wheels allowed for the use of pavement-gripping, wider-than-stock competition tires. Additionally, the incorporation of plexiglass windows aided both safety and weight. Power was derived from a Hi-Po 289-cu.in. V-8 engine fitted with a special 715-cfm Holley four-barrel carburetor on a counter-accessory Cobra high-rise intake manifold. Completing the engine build were Tri-Y headers, an external oil cooler, and a high-capacity Ford radiator. Behind the engine sat a Borg-Warner T-10 four-speed manual transmission.

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9 flavors of prewar hot rod at Mecum’s 2021 Indy sale – Brandan Gillogly @Hagerty

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If you’re in the market for a prewar hot rod, Mecum’s Indianapolis auction running May 14–22 has something from just about every era you could desire. While the cars themselves were built before WWII, the different eras of customization really kicked off after the war. If you prefer your ’32 Fords and Model A coupes, roadsters, cabriolets, and sedans more in the factory flavor, Mecum has those as well. For now, let’s take a look at a 9 varieties of custom builds that trace a timeline of hot rod design.

Perhaps you’re looking for something simple with a unique pedigree. In that case, this 1927 Ford Model T track roadster might suit you. This racing roadster was built in the vein of the ’40s and ’50s racers that plied dirt tracks all over Southern California and comes from the collection of road-racing phenom Parnelli Jones. It’s powered by a 304-cubic-inch Ford flathead V-8 wearing a set of aluminum heads. It tuns on alcohol and turns the tires by way of a three-speed manual trans.

For those who would like a leg up on their hot-rod build but still want some say in the final product, this handsome, black 1932 Ford roadster has much of the hardest work already done. The subtle modifications and vintage speed parts give it a traditional 1950s hot-rod look. The Ford flathead has a 4 inch-stroke crank, likely compliments of a Mercury. It’s topped by a set of Smith heads and uses an Isky cam to breathe through a twin-carb Eddie Meyer intake and gorgeous Eddie Meyer air cleaner. Inside, the dash is filled with a full complement of Stewart Warner gauges. It doesn’t get much more iconic in the world of hot rods than a ’32 Roadster, and this one is built with a fantastic collection of vintage components.

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Coffee Walk – Numbers Matching 1966 Shelby Mustang GT350H – Dennis Collins

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Welcome to Coffee Walk Ep. 140! Today’s Coffee Walk is one that my team and I have put a lot of passion and hours into.

This numbers-matching 1966 Mustang Shelby GT350H (previously in storage for 49 years) has the pedigree, history, style, class and importance to make any car guy / gal completely geek out- especially me.

Now go on ahead and take a look at today’s episode and let me know what y’all think! As always… go fast, have fun and have a GREAT WEEKEND!!

This 1966 MUSTANG SHELBY GT 350 HERTZ is being offered for sale right now on Bring-A-Trailer.com (BARN FIND on Bring-A-Trailer) Bring-A-Trailer Auction: https://bringatrailer.com/listing/196…

Auction ends Monday, April 12 at 1:00pm This 1966 Shelby Mustang GT350H was originally used as a Hertz rental car in Virginia and is said to have been stored in 1972 by its previous owner, from whom the selling dealer acquired the car out of Colorado in January 2021. Subsequent work included refinishing and installing a replacement driver-side door, inspecting the cylinder heads, overhauling the brakes and fuel system, rebuilding the carburetor, changing the fluids, and replacing the tires.

Finished in black with gold stripes over a black interior, the car is powered by a numbers-matching 289ci V8 paired with a three-speed automatic transmission and a 9″ rear axle. Additional features include fixed quarter windows, hood and side scoops, 14″ wheels, front disc brakes, lap harnesses, and an AM radio

. This GT350H is now offered in Texas with its removed driver-side door, fuel pump, and front brake calipers as well as order sheets and correspondence from SAAC, an owner’s manual, and a clean Colorado title.

Legend of the Green Hornet – BARRETT-JACKSON

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The restoration of a lifetime! The incredible story of how Barrett-Jackson CEO and Chairman Craig Jackson and an elite team of automotive restoration specialists set out to restore the rarest and most desirable Shelby Mustang of all time, the 1968 EXP 500 Green Hornet.

The Green Hornet’s provenance of being a double prototype puts it into a unique category and represents a rolling history of what was happening within Ford and Shelby American in the heyday of the American muscle car era. The performance DNA of all modern Mustangs and Shelbys leads back to this very car, making this 1968 Ford Mustang Notchback Coupe – as Carroll Shelby once said – “the one and only Green Hornet.”

More here at Barrett Jackson

The Hunt for Little Red – BARRETT-JACKSON

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It was assumed lost for over 50 years, another prototype destined for the crusher. Except this one wasn’t. Witness the incredible story of Barrett-Jackson CEO and Chairman Craig Jackson’s personal quest to find and restore the mythical father of the Mustang California Special, the 1967 Shelby GT500 Prototype (EXP 500) known as “Little Red.” Discovered sitting in a Texas field, Little Red was Carroll Shelby’s way of getting the better of Ferrari’s road cars and the first of many incredible innovations. Get ready for the journey – exploring the restoration for one of the rarest cars on Earth!

More here on Barrett Jackson

Pair of Wagons from Edsel Ford’s Collection Up for Auction – Tom Comerro @Hemmings

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Craig Jackson, Chairman and CEO of Barrett-Jackson, announces the sale of two wagons once owned by Edsel Ford II. Both are to be sold at no reserve by the grandson of the brand’s namesake during the Scottsdale Auction at WestWorld in Scottsdale, Arizona, on March 20-27.

The 1958 Edsel Bermuda wagon features recent restoration work and a transmission swap (from manual to period-correct automatic) carried out by Roush. The rear axle has new seals, bushings, and brakes, while the interior was updated with heat shielding, new carpeting, and seals to make the car more comfortable and inviting. Roush also replaced the original column-shift assembly, while keeping the stock steering column. The proper two-pedal system for automatics of that time was installed, and new control linkage was built.

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The Famous Horse Beating 1932 Ford “Pete Henderson” Roadster Sold for $192,500 at RM Sotheby’s Hershey Auction

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As the story goes, back in 1944, a guy with a quick quarter horse won countless bets challenging hot cars to a race. This roadster, however, had a reputation as the quickest car in the San Fernando Valley. With Pete Henderson behind the wheel, in a specially staged race held in La Habra, and witnessed by a large crowd, including speed equipment gurus Vic Edelbrock Sr., Ed Winfield, and Phil Weiand, this deuce was the only car that ever won. Ernie McAfee took a famous grainy photo showing the roadster edging out the horse. Noted hot rod racer Ak Miller and writer Gray Baskerville always said they could trace the origins of ¼-mile drag racing to that famous contest.

The full listing can be found here

Lincoln limousines among Kennedy items in Bonhams presidential auction – Bob Golfen @ClassicCars.com

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Two historically important Lincoln limousines that carried President John F. Kennedy – one of which he rode in on day that he was assassinated – will be offered during Bonhams’ live/online American Presidential Experience Auction in New York on October 14, just three weeks ahead of the presidential election.

Auction also includes a display replica of the first Air Force One jet and a full-scale mockup of the White House Oval Office

The white 1963 Lincoln Continental convertible that was designated “Limo One,” and which carried the President and first lady on the morning of November 22, 1963, in Fort Worth with Texas Governor John Connally, has a pre-auction estimated value of $300,000 to $500,000.

The other Lincoln is a 1960 Lincoln Continental Mark V Executive Limousine used by President Kennedy for personal trips in Washington, DC. The Mark V was specially outfitted by Hess and Eisenhardt for presidential use with bulletproof doors, divider window, passenger air controls and a two-way telephone in the back seat, which was an uncommon luxury for the period.

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Books from Richard Edmonds Auctions

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About an hour away there is an auctioneers that specialise in transportation and automobilia. I managed to score a set of books called “Automobile Engineering” from 1920 published by the American Technical Society. Very interesting stuff!

Upon collection from the auction site there were a number of cars to be collected, including a Model T and a Metropolitan

Richard Edmonds auctions are in Chippenham Wiltshire and hold regular classic car and automobilia auctions.