Category: Carroll Shelby

A Brief History of Shelby Cars – Hagerty Media

A Brief History of Shelby Cars – Hagerty Media

Advertisements

This is a really interesting listen from the Hagerty Sidedrafts podcast, Carroll Shelby did more than Ford

Carroll Shelby behind the wheel in 1964.Credit…Associated Press

Listen here

Everyone knows Carroll Shelby’s work with race cars and Mustangs, but he’s done so much more than that! Join us for a fun conversation about some of the lesser-known Shelby cars, hosted by Shelby expert, Colin Comer, and Brad Phillips, Executive Director of LeMay America’s Car Museum.

Legend of the Green Hornet – BARRETT-JACKSON

Advertisements
The restoration of a lifetime! The incredible story of how Barrett-Jackson CEO and Chairman Craig Jackson and an elite team of automotive restoration specialists set out to restore the rarest and most desirable Shelby Mustang of all time, the 1968 EXP 500 Green Hornet.

The Green Hornet’s provenance of being a double prototype puts it into a unique category and represents a rolling history of what was happening within Ford and Shelby American in the heyday of the American muscle car era. The performance DNA of all modern Mustangs and Shelbys leads back to this very car, making this 1968 Ford Mustang Notchback Coupe – as Carroll Shelby once said – “the one and only Green Hornet.”

More here at Barrett Jackson

The Hunt for Little Red – BARRETT-JACKSON

Advertisements

It was assumed lost for over 50 years, another prototype destined for the crusher. Except this one wasn’t. Witness the incredible story of Barrett-Jackson CEO and Chairman Craig Jackson’s personal quest to find and restore the mythical father of the Mustang California Special, the 1967 Shelby GT500 Prototype (EXP 500) known as “Little Red.” Discovered sitting in a Texas field, Little Red was Carroll Shelby’s way of getting the better of Ferrari’s road cars and the first of many incredible innovations. Get ready for the journey – exploring the restoration for one of the rarest cars on Earth!

More here on Barrett Jackson

Find of the Day: Flash Gordon’s 1968 Ford Mustang Shelby G.T. 500 – Barry Kluczyk @Hemmings

Advertisements

The 1968 model year was an interesting one for the Shelby lineup. Ford took increasing control in all aspects of the cars’ design, production, and marketing. Notably, production shifted from Shelby’s Los Angeles facility to a specialty factory run by A.O. Smith, in Ionia, Michigan — the same company tasked with producing the cars’ unique fiberglass body components. Additionally, Shelby opened an office in one of Motown’s industrial suburbs.

It was also the second year for the big-block-powered G.T. 500, with its Police Interceptor-based 428 engine. And while the original Shelby models were stripped-down, track-focused performers, the later Sixties saw an evolution of them into more luxurious muscle cars, like this 1968 G.T. 500 four-speed convertible, in Candy Apple Red, that’s offered on Hemmings Auctions. Along with its lid-lowering option, a Marti Report indicates it’s one of only four such convertibles ordered with factory air conditioning.

That makes it one rare Shelby, but according to the seller, the original owner was also a former Olympian and Hollywood action star: Buster Crabbe. After winning a gold medal in swimming at the 1932 Olympics, he went on to portray Tarzan, Buck Rogers, and Flash Gordon in popular film serials of the 1930s and 1940s. When his acting career began to slow, he became the public face of a New Jersey swimming pool manufacturer and it’s the Garden State where he apparently purchased this G.T. 500.

Read on

15 Shelby Facts every gearhead should know – Scott Oldham @Hemmings

Advertisements

With the possible exceptions of Henry Ford and Mario Andretti, Carroll Shelby is America’s most famous automotive personality. That was probably true before the movie Ford v Ferrari hit it big last year, and it’s certainly the case in its wake. He’s been called America’s Enzo Ferrari. It was meant as a compliment, but the Texan hated his Italian rival and probably took it as a dig.Shelby was an accomplished race car driver and builder of great cars. His machines, many of which wore his name, have won on racetracks all over the world and commanded respect on the main streets of America for nearly 60 years. Although he accomplished great things later in his career, Carroll’s heyday was the 1960s, when he was building his original Cobras and Shelby Mustangs, and kicking Enzo’s ass with the Daytona Coupes and the GT40s. In tribute, here are 15 important Shelby Facts from that era everyone should know.

The Cannonball

Rick Kopec and Brock Yates at the 1979 Cannonball. Photo from the Hemmings Archives.

An on-track success, the Shelby Mustang GT350 would seem like a natural for the original Cannonball Baker Sea-to-Shining-Sea Memorial Trophy Dash, but it only appeared once. Organized by Car and Driver’s Brock Yates multiple times between 1971 and 1979, the races ran from New York City to Redondo Beach, California in Los Angeles. In the final event Rick Kopec, one of the founders of the Shelby American Automobile Club, and Robert Key, a psychologist from Southern California, entered Key’s Shelby, finishing in 38th place with a time of 48 hours and 53 minutes, a run that included a lengthy encounter with some New Jersey State Troopers. With 176,000 miles on it, the Mustang was far from new, and competed with a 3.00 rear end gear and a 32-gallon fuel tank they installed. Seven years earlier Pete Brock, the designer of the Shelby Daytona Coupe, competed with two others in a new Mercedes 280SEL sedan, finishing third in 37 hours and 33 minutes.

Small-block Cobra production

1965 Shelby 289 Cobra, CSX2588. Photos by David Newhardt, courtesy Mecum Auctions.

Many associate the Cobra with a monster big-block, but more were made with the smaller (and arguably better-matched) V-8. Shelby built 580 Cobras powered by the 271 horsepower High Performance 289 cubic inch small-block, the same solid-lifter engine found in 1965-1966 K-code Mustangs. Of those, one was a bare chassis. The street cars numbered 453 and about 30 got automatic transmissions. There were also 61 competition cars built included six Daytona coupes and four Dragonsnakes.

Read on for the rest

Was Leo Beebe a corporate villain or a good guy with a tough job? – Frank Comstock @Hemmings

Advertisements

With the release of the Ford v Ferrari movie, there has been renewed interest associated with my 2016 article here on Hemmings concerning Ford executive Leo Beebe and the end of the 1966 Le Mans race. Comments, around 200 in number four years after initial publication, show the passion of people on both sides of the dispute. With that in mind, it’s worth another dive into what kind of person Leo Beebe was, based on his background and people who knew him.
Editor’s note: This story comes to us from Hemmings reader and contributor Frank Comstock, a friend of the late Leo Beebe.
Let’s think of this as a highway between two cities representing the two major aspects of the dispute. While there are several entrance and exit ramps along the highway, the ramps at one city represent the argument that Beebe did not like Ken Miles and didn’t want him to win the race, while the ramps at the other city represent the argument that Beebe engineered the end of the race to please Henry Ford II, the man who had funded Ford’s Le Mans effort to the tune of as much as thirty million dollars. The ramps in between those cities represent the opinions of those who fall somewhere in the middle of the two sentiments.

Anything but a shrinking flower: How codename Daisy, the 2004 Shelby Cobra concept came together – @Hemmings

Advertisements

[Editor’s Note: Chris Theodore’s book, “The Last Shelby Cobra: My times with Carroll Shelby,” released last year, recounts not only the former Chrysler, AMC, and Ford engineer’s relationship with his boyhood hero, but also the development process for the 2004 Shelby Cobra Concept. In this excerpt from the book that Chris provided, we get to see how the concept car, codenamed Daisy, came together.]

Every year in Detroit after the North American International Auto Show, J Mays and I would get together to plan concept vehicles for the next year’s round of shows: LA, Detroit, Chicago, and New York. Mays’ design team would provide suggestions, as did my Advanced Product Creation group. With the success of the Ford GT at the centennial, it was no surprise that a modern Shelby Cobra was at the top of both our lists. We also decided to do a new Bronco and Lincoln Mark X. Mays let Richard Hutting, manager of the Valencia Advanced Design Studio, know that we would be reviewing proposal sketches on our next trip out west – as J and I would pay regular visits to the Irvine and Valencia studios for design reviews. Now that the world knew about Petunia, we decided to call this project Daisy. We intended the codename to be a little tongue-in-cheek and sort of a tease. As J said, it would be “anything but a shrinking flower.” Eventually everyone would know that we were up to something, but not know what. I called it a ‘fan dance’ – the most tantalizing secrets are the one that you know are there, but cannot quite see. In late March, we sent Manfred Rumpel to see Hutting, specifically to explore how to help with the packaging of the Ford GT suspension and a V-10 engine. During one of my weekly program reviews with the SVT team, I mentioned to (O. John) Coletti that I had kicked off Project Daisy

Read on

825 hp and available manual? Sign us up! Shelby Signature Series – Tom Stahler @ClassicCars.com

Advertisements

The 2020 model Carroll Shelby Signature Series Ford Mustang will be introduced by Shelby American at the National Automobile Dealer Association Show in Las Vegas on February 14. It is the only sports car in the world available in new car dealer showrooms with a choice of convertible or fastback, automatic or manual transmission, and 825 street-legal horsepower. A total of 50 limited-edition sports cars will be available. Several are already spoken for.

The Shelby American team spent the past two years carefully engineering and refining the car to create a vehicle worthy of Carroll Shelby’s name. They worked closely with Ford Performance and other partners on the new vehicle.

Read on

The 427 FE Sideoiler: Powering Ford To Victory At LeMans And Reissued By Shelby Engines Today – Jonathan Bergman @HotCars.com

Advertisements

The 427 FE Sideoiler: Powering Ford To Victory At LeMans

Unlike other displacements in the FE-series, the 427 version – which was actually a 426, take that Chrysler! – was the only race engine in the lot.

With the “Ford v Ferrari” movie opening in theaters this weekend, it might help to review some of the details which delivered victory for Ford at LeMans in 1966. There’s the GT40 itself, of course, the will of Henry Ford II and his need to crush Ferrari, massive engineering and financial resources of Ford, renegade race car drivers, California hot-rodders, Carroll Shelby, and last but certainly not least the venerable Ford 427 FE Sideoiler engine. The motor that started it all.

The 427 FE Sideoiler: Powering Ford To Victory At LeMans

Read on 

Related – Part of Ford’s 1966 Le Mans podium sweep, this GT40 Mk II could set an auction record