Posted in Engine, GM

GM’s New Pump-Gas ZZ632/1000 Crate Engine: 1,000 Naturally Aspirated Horsepower in a Box – Jeff Koch @Hemmings

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Modern rally cars fling themselves sideways around woodland courses with 400 turbocharged horsepower on tap. Today’s Indy cars make between 600 and 750 horsepower to go 230-plus mph at the 500. DTM touring cars from Germany top 600 ponies. And contemporary NASCAR racers churn out 750 horses and regularly touch 200 mph on superspeedways.

This is all context for Chevy announcing its ZZ632/1000 crate engine at SEMA, the annual automotive bacchanalia-infused trade show in Las Vegas. It’s all in the name: The engine displaces 632 cu.in. and makes 1,000 naturally aspirated horsepower (or 1004 horses, but when you’ve entered four-digit-horsepower territory, it’s probably okay to round a little). It also delivers 876 pound-feet of torque on pump gas. That’s more power than a NASCAR stocker or an Indy car has. All that in a box—and maybe between the wheel wells of your own car.

Other crate engines with 1,000 horsepower have been made available, but the ZZ632/1000 is all engine, no power-adder required. The block is shared with GM’s already-available 572-cu.in. crate engine, which includes four-bolt mains and a forged rotating assembly. For 632-cube duty, the block has been treated to a 0.040 overbore and was redesigned to fit connecting rods that are 0.375 inch longer. Those new rods are topped by pistons that, in conjunction with the new CNC-machined aluminum cylinder heads, squeeze the air-fuel mixture as 12.0:1 compression.

 The RS-X Symmetrical Port heads were designed by Ron Sperry, one of his final jobs at GM after more than half a century of building hot street and racing engines for GM. Rather than the uneven port shapes of previous big-blocks, these heads feature symmetrical intake and exhaust ports so that no cylinder is “starved”; all eight chambers get an equal air/fuel mix. It’s a trick Sperry used on the Gen III small-block (i.e., the LS engines launched in the C5 Corvette). While not strictly new, it remains an effective power strategy.

Posted in Chevrolet, Engine, LS, S10

LSx Conversion Information for Chevrolet S10 – Philntx @S10Forum.com

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This post is a compilation of parts, suggestions, tips, and practices to successfully swap an LS-based engine into an S10 Truck (2WD, and Blazer variants)

Most swappers generally underestimate the total costs and time for these conversions.

Keep the engine bay clean. Once the original engine is pulled out, spend $10.00 on some degreaser and a car wash pressure washer. Can of black paint is under $5.00

Since no truck is built the same, it is difficult to put a specific construction price on the conversion. Parts range from complete swap kits from CPW, to junkyard dog conversions (using take off fans, radiators, modified f-body exhaust manifolds, DIY wiring harnesses, etc.)

This will not cover every combination, but will primarily cover the installation of a Stock LS engine and either manual or auto trans in these trucks.

4WD:

With the exception of the oil pan and exhaust system, the 4WD swaps are essentially the same. This swap will require a custom or fabricated oil pan, fabricated exhaust system, vacuum lines, better cooling, etc. The exhaust may include modified F-Body manifolds or custom headers.

4WD swaps are more labor intensive. Clearances are much tighter. The front differential interferes with every “stock” LSx oil pan. Several swaps have been completed using H3 Alpha pans and dropping the differential by 3/4″

If the back side of the engine is in the same location as the back side of the 4.3, then the front and rear driveshafts will not require modification. However, if you move the engine backwards any (in order to gain clearance for the radiator and fans), this will require shortening the rear and lengthening the front driveshaft.

The 4WD S10 uses a remote oil filtration system, which is an advantage, but requires additional plumbing.

The skid plates (if they retained) hinder air flow out of the engine compartment.

Suppliers of shortie and long-tube headers state that their headers are for 2WD applications.

This will be a closed post, which will be updated for new and/or better suggestions/parts/techniques. (send me a PM for suggestions)

Each component of the swap is in a separate section:

Cooling
Harness
A/C
Exhaust
Mounts
Engine components
Front accessories
Fuel
Oil Pans
Suspension/brakes
Emissions
Transmissions
Engine Identification
Security

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Posted in Engine, Model A Ford

How to: Ford Model A motor (engine)- Pistons and Rods: Assemble and Install – Paul Shinn

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By popular request- How to assemble a Ford Model A motor (“engine” for you sticklers) and I also reveal my “secret weapon”, Willie Baechler from Baechler Machine Shop in San Andreas, California. 209-754-4646 is the telephone number if you want a Model A motor properly rebuilt. He is the BEST! Period. Shop address- 730 Industrial Way San Andreas, CA 95249. Next video in this series, I’ll show how to install the valves, cam, adjust valves, etc.

Posted in 1978, Hemmings, Pontiac, Pontiac V8, station wagon

The Pontiac Grand Safari was a flagship station wagon hauling on in an era of downsizing – Matt Litwin @Hemmings

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By 1974, 5,000-plus-pound family cars were suddenly as impractical as the ol’ muscle car had been to newlyweds holding a freshly printed mortgage and a newborn baby just a few years earlier. Detuned as they were, the large-displacement—still a prevalent means of motivation within the market segment-remained incredibly thirsty. As a result, Pontiac’s full-size output fell to just under 145,500 cars in 1975, and only 137,216 were sold a year later.

Suffice it to say, Detroit needed a diet, and the automakers knew it well in advance thanks in large part to looming federal mandates. At GM, the first to be first slimmed down were the 1977 model-year full-size cars. Among them was Pontiac’s flagship station wagon—the Grand Safari.

The downsized wagon’s chassis was reduced from 127 inches to a svelte 115.9 inches. Much of the basic architecture, however, carried over from the previous generation: independent coil spring front suspension, rear leaf-sprung suspension, power steering, and power front disc brakes. Also included as a standard were FR78-15 radial tires that provided sure-footed control in all driving conditions.

The redesigned chassis cradled an equally new 5.0-liter (301-cu.in.) V-8 engine. It was more than the division’s new “economy” powerplant; rated for a rather capable 135 horsepower, the block, crankshaft, cylinder heads, and intake manifold—collectively—weighed 136 pounds less than the 350-cu.in. V-8. Factory literature touted the availability of a “new 6.6 litre (400/403 CID) V-8” on the Grand Safari’s option chart—technically a carryover engine revamped for ’77—that was rated for 180 or 200 hp. Californians could have opted for the 170-hp 350. A Turbo Hydra-Matic automatic was the only transmission available.

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Posted in Engine, Flathead V8, Flathead V8 Block, Ford Flathead V8

The 1939 Mercury Engine Is Stuck And Will Not BUDGE!!! – @Irontrap

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While we had the Schroll 32 Coupe at the Wheels of Time Jamboree there was an open space in the shop. The 1939 Mercury has been sitting in storage until we had some free time and space, but starting to free up the engine should be an easy job. Boy did we under estimate how stuck this engine is

Posted in Autoevolution, Engine, Flathead V8, Flathead V8 Block, Ford, Ford Flathead V8, Ford Flathead V8, magazine

Dare to Cruise Above 55 MPH in This Restored “Coca-Cola” 1946 Ford F-1 Flathead – Aurel Niculescu @AutoEvolution

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Officially, the F-Series kicked off its legendary adventure starting with the 1948 model year. But the original generation is also known as the Bonus-Built series. Meanwhile, previous trucks were largely unchanged since the start of WWII for America, that dreadful 1941.

So, do we hold it against the good folks over at PC Classic Cars in Sherman, Texas for potentially confusing the F-1 name with a truck that was created before the age of the F-Series? Purists might, but we are going to be as reconciliatory as possible, considering the very nice Coca-Cola-like paintjob. True, we might have a soft spot for crimson and creamy white combinations…

Now that everyone has finished ogling at the pristine exterior details, let’s get down to the classic pickup truck business. This 1946 Ford was probably restored sometimes during previous ownership – there isn’t much background to go along with as far as its historic whereabouts are concerned. We did catch the dealer’s reference that “extensive records and photos from restoration” are also available.

And this time around, we paid more attention than ever to what the consigner has to say, considering the laugh we had after reading the proud statement that we are dealing with a “truck (that) will cruise at 55 mph.” That’s just 89 kph for the Old Continent fans. But, then again, even after a full restoration, it’s still a very old truck – and well within pension rights at 75 years of age

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Posted in Engine

5 Greatest And 5 Worst Engines Ever Put In American Muscle Cars – Ramya Shah @HotCars

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The heart and powerhouse of the automobile, which allows a car to breathe, have gone through many phases, growing with time. Bells and whistles are a thing of the past. What matters most in a muscle automobile is what’s under the hood, and the bigger and harder the better. We’re talking a lot of horsepowers and they’re not particularly fuel-efficient, but that’s what makes them classic muscle cars in the first place.

The American muscle car scene enjoyed a golden era in the 1960s and 1970s, and it has since become a popular American activity for individuals who appreciate learning about different automobile features and a hobby for collectors who can afford it. In its heyday, we saw some of the world’s rarest and most legendary muscle cars and eventually, some of the worst. Most of them are equipped with massive torque-rich V-8 engines.

There may be too many components on a car that can go wrong, from transmissions locking up to engines exploding. But, of all the problems you could face, a broken motor is probably the worst. Whether you have two or twelve cylinders, one of them will ultimately detonate, leaving you stranded. While most cars have 100,000 miles or more on the odometer before problems arise, certain engines have birth defects from the start. So let us look at the hearts where they got softened and where they shined the most.

10 409 Chevy Big Block

The Chevrolet 409 V8 is a dead end in the Chevrolet high-performance tale, but it’s a fascinating one that deserves a closer examination. The 409 V8 is a so-called “missing link” in Chevrolet’s horsepower history. From 1961 through 1965, they produced the Chevrolet 409. This first-generation big block was dubbed the W series by General Motors

In 1963, they rated the engine at 425 horsepower which could push Big automobiles like the 1964 Chevrolet Impala SS to speeds fast enough to inspire the Beach Boys to create a song about it.

FORD 427 “CAMMER”

Few racing engines from the Motor City could compete with Ford’s 427 CID SOHC V8 engine, the “90-day wonder,” or “Cammer,” is still a popular nickname for it, during the muscle car era. This famous powerhouse produced a staggering 657 horsepower when fitted with dual four-barrel carburetors.

It was planned to be Ford’s two-valve, single-overhead-cam, the high-rpm answer to Chrysler’s 426 Hemi for NASCAR in 1964, but because NASCAR refused to allow it, only a few street vehicles received this motor.

Dodge 426 Hemi

Throughout the ’60s muscle car era, the Hemi could be one of the most well-known engines ever installed in a muscle car, which Hemi has left an unmistakable mark on the history of the automobile.

The engine’s reputation has long transcended its actuality, earning it the nickname “Elephant” because of its immense size, weight, and output figures. However, the Hemi name continues to be in the current V8 range, including the Hellcat 717-hp and the Super Stock 807-hp Challenger.

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Posted in Engine, Ford

Secrets of the FORD 427 SOHC The MIGHTY CAMMER!!! – Unity MotorSports Garage

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Today on Unity Motorsports Garage. We take a look back at the secrets of the Ford 427 SOHC cammer and how even in its short lifespan it made a lasting impression on the Hot Rodding and Racing world! The Cammer paved the way to the Modern Ford Mod Motors, 6.2 SOHC and Coyote engines! I hope you enjoy this video #427Cammer #ConnieKalitta #HubertPlatt #DynoDon #FordDragTeam