Category: Flathead V8 Block

Dare to Cruise Above 55 MPH in This Restored “Coca-Cola” 1946 Ford F-1 Flathead – Aurel Niculescu @AutoEvolution

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Officially, the F-Series kicked off its legendary adventure starting with the 1948 model year. But the original generation is also known as the Bonus-Built series. Meanwhile, previous trucks were largely unchanged since the start of WWII for America, that dreadful 1941.

So, do we hold it against the good folks over at PC Classic Cars in Sherman, Texas for potentially confusing the F-1 name with a truck that was created before the age of the F-Series? Purists might, but we are going to be as reconciliatory as possible, considering the very nice Coca-Cola-like paintjob. True, we might have a soft spot for crimson and creamy white combinations…

Now that everyone has finished ogling at the pristine exterior details, let’s get down to the classic pickup truck business. This 1946 Ford was probably restored sometimes during previous ownership – there isn’t much background to go along with as far as its historic whereabouts are concerned. We did catch the dealer’s reference that “extensive records and photos from restoration” are also available.

And this time around, we paid more attention than ever to what the consigner has to say, considering the laugh we had after reading the proud statement that we are dealing with a “truck (that) will cruise at 55 mph.” That’s just 89 kph for the Old Continent fans. But, then again, even after a full restoration, it’s still a very old truck – and well within pension rights at 75 years of age

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How to spot a Ford pushrod V-8, from flathead to 460 – Brandan Gillogly @Hagerty

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How to spot a Ford pushrod V-8, from flathead to 460

Let’s say it’s your lucky day, and you’ve found an engine laying around in the back of a garage with an unknown history. Or maybe you’re trying to discern which engine was swapped into a car, and all of the aftermarket parts between the fenders are muddying the waters. In any case, the first step is always to identify the engine

Determining precisely which engine you’re looking at under the hood can be difficult. Heck, sometimes a brand produced more engine families in the same decade than you can count on both hands. If you’re pretty sure you’re looking at a Ford V-8, the following guide will help you make the proper ID of your engine so that you can dive deeper into the ID.

This article, focusing on Ford passenger car V-8s, isn’t a full history on engine tech or applications. It’s intended as a primer to help you narrow things down and, in turn, enrich your gearhead knowledge. We’ll focus on the biggest visual keys to look for when you come face-to-valve-cover with eight cylinders of Detroit metal.

Ford flathead V-8: 1932–53

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The Fox Mustang is a Rising Star; Here’s What to Know Before Buying – Jeff Koch @Hemmings

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Despite the critical drubbing it now receives from the collector community, Ford sold more than 1 million Mustang IIs over its five-year run during largely awful economic times. It would be easy to screw up that kind of sales record, so any new Mustang had a hard act to follow. Luckily, Ford developed a winner that lasted a decade and a half with relatively minor alterations with bones that lived under Mustangs clear into 2004.

Factory-built convertibles returned for 1983

Much as the original Mustang had Falcon underpinnings, the new-for-1979 Fox-platform Mustang used new-for-1978 Ford Fairmont chassis basics, including MacPherson strut front suspension, rack-and-pinion steering, and sections of the Fairmont’s floorpans. Fairmont was Ford’s new bread-and-butter sedan and had been met with strong positive reaction from both the press and consumers for its overall package of cost, room, efficiency, and driving pleasure; it was a no-brainer to base the redesigned 1979-’93 Ford Mustang upon it. Unusually for the era of gas-crunch-influenced downsizing, the Mustang (no Roman numeral attached) managed to be bigger than the car it replaced: Its wheelbase and overall length stood 4-plus inches larger, while overall height, plus front and rear track, all grew an inch. And yet the new Mustang, without the use of exotic materials like aluminum in the body or engine, weighed 200 pounds less than a comparable Mustang II.

A decade after they were discontinued; the ’82 GT signaled that Mustang performance returned.

One of the reasons the Mustang II caught so much flack is that, despite wild-looking stripes-and-spoilers versions like the Cobra II and King Cobra, the top engine was a 134-horsepower 5-liter V-8 —a far cry from the Mustang’s ’60s performance image. In truth, the V-8 was more or less a carryover for 1979, and the hot high-tech turbocharged 2.3-liter four made 132 horsepower. But the style and driving dynamics won customers over. Once the GT reappeared for 1982, Mustang never looked back: It renewed its cross-town rivalry with the Camaro, which was going through its own downsizing and performance renaissance, and quickly became the choice for hometown-hero hotshoes. Mustang’s second life, post-1987 as a late-model cheap-thrills machine, was furthered by its combination of robust simplicity and forward-thinking, high-tech, easily manipulated components. It’s fair to say that these cars are still affordable: Even clean examples of the hottest performance models (bar the limited Cobra R, and the best examples of the ’93 Cobra) remain at or below their original sticker price, and if you go the restoration route, there are plenty of unwanted boneyard specials to donate parts to one that will be improved and cherished. But its legacy, serving as a highlight among generations of Mustang, remains strong today. The Fox Mustang lasted for such a long time and sold so many copies over its 15-year life (2.6 million, not including the hundreds of thousands of Fox-based Mercury Capris built from 1979-’86) that breakdowns for individual model years will be impossible. It also means that there are plenty of examples out there in the wild to choose from, and doubtless plenty more that can be scored for a bargain and picked for parts.

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What To Look For When Buying and Building A Ford Flathead – Hot Rod Engines 101 – Matt Murray @Irontrap Garage

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Video on buying a Ford Flathead V8 and associated speed equipment from the excellent Matt Murray of Irontrap Garage

This is the first in a series from Matt, watch out for the other episodes. For anything traditional hot rod check out Matt’s channel and Instagram

How to Rebuild and Modify Ford Flathead V-8 Engines – Mike Bishop and Vern Tardel

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Keep it mild or build it wild, but either way, How to Rebuild and Modify Ford Flathead V8 Engines will help ensure your flathead is delivering the power you need.

The ultimate Ford flathead resource for hot rodders and restorers.The last commercially produced Ford Flathead V-8 was cast over 60 years ago. Simple by today’s high-tech standards, during its performance reign from the late ’30s through the mid ’50s, the flathead was unsurpassed for go-fast power on the cheap. It spawned the modern aftermarket speed-equipment industry and became a favorite of bootleggers, dry-lakes racers, dirt trackers, street racers, and a whole generation that just wanted fast cars

 

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1941 Ford fuels father and son’s need for speed – Alyn Edwards @Driving.ca

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Convertible has been in the family for 64 years and will most likely be passed on to the next generation

1941 Ford fuels father and son’s need for speed

The year was 1955 and Sam McVicar was a car crazy 18-year-old. He was part of the hot rod and custom scene that had taken over Vancouver streets and he’d bought himself a beautiful ride.

The immaculate Florentine Blue 1941 Ford convertible with tan convertible top and red leather interior was owned by a couple in North Vancouver. Sam had seen it once before when it was being serviced by downtown dealership Dominion Vancouver Motors. He jumped at the chance to buy it for $500 when it came up for sale.

Hopping up the flathead V8 motor was a must. He lowered the car with a dropped front axle and, after beginning work for legendary Vancouver customizer Blackie Green, he louvered the hood. Not satisfied with the performance, he dropped in torquey Oldsmobile engine topped with a six-carburetor manifold. Then Sam went drag racing.

Read the article here

1941 Ford fuels father and son’s need for speed

Related – Canadian Flathead Block Identification By Fred Mills