Category: Ford Taurus

The Taurus SHO is the fastest, most expensive Ford sedan | Revelations with Jason Cammisa @Hagerty

The Taurus SHO is the fastest, most expensive Ford sedan | Revelations with Jason Cammisa @Hagerty

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With a development budget of $3.5 billion, the Taurus was Ford’s most expensive project ever. It was also a Hail Mary for the company, which was in financial trouble.


And the SHO was the fastest version of the Taurus.

If the Taurus failed, so, too would Ford. It was so important to the success of the company that Ford restructured the engineering and design teams to work together on the new family sedan.

The Taurus’s design was so revolutionary that Ford kept its previous mid-size sedan, the LTD, in production at the same time, just in the new car failed — as the other American car executives predicted it would. Instead, Taurus was an enormous success, eventually becoming the bestselling car in America. The performance version, the Taurus SHO, used the same basic 3.0-liter Vulcan V-6, but instead of pushrods, it used four overhead cams and 24 valves. The DOHC 4-valve heads were designed, manufactured, and assembled by Yamaha in Japan.

The SHO used a Mazda-sourced 5-speed manual and was the most powerful front-wheel drive sedan in the world. The only four-doors quicker or faster in America were the BMW M5 (E34) and 750iL. It was a performance bargain.

But although Ford sold around 400,000 Tauruses per year, it didn’t come close to its target of 20,000 SHOs annually. Except for the first year with the new, optional automatic transmission and larger 3.2-liter SHOgun engine.

Why didn’t the SHO sell? Well, because it looked like a Taurus — then, the de rigueur family sedan for the person who didn’t care about performance.

So the SHO was a victim of the Taurus’ success.

This Well Preserved 1989 Ford Taurus SHO Might Be The One To Get – Edward Snitkoff @FordAuthority

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The first-generation Ford Taurus revolutionized the mid-size sedan segment, literally sending competitors like General Motors and several Japanese rivals back to the drawing board. Several years after its introduction, Ford managed to once again light the world on fire with the 1989 Ford Taurus SHO, a range-topping performance model packed with respectable performance and driving dynamics.

Today, lightly-used models are starting to command prices well above $5,000, but our featured SHO currently on sale on Bring a Trailer with no reserve might not reach that high. That’s because of some imperfections that might make it a better deal than the extremely clean collectibles still out there.

Currently, $3,600 is the maximum bid for this 1989 Ford Taurus SHO. That’s a bit lower than expected, though there are two major reasons why bidders might be staying away. For starters, the true mileage of this SHO cannot be verified at the moment. The Carfax report suggests the odometer rolled over at some point, making it a 141K mile vehicle.

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Ford Taurus SHO: What’s in a Name? – George Kennedy @Motor1.com

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The Ford Taurus SHO is our kind of car. Plain and simple. Take an otherwise unassuming family sedan, throw a high-revving Yamaha V6 under the hood, mate it to a Mazda-sourced 6-speed manual transmission, and you have the kind of strange that gives us warm fuzzies. But what inspired such a strange decision? The Big Three aren’t always the big risk takers on fun cars, and the performance-sedan game wasn’t really a consideration outside of the M5 and E55 AMG. So what gives? It turns out those glorious-looking engines were never intended for mom’s grocery-getter; they were meant for a mid-engine sports car that never came to be. Well…that’s one take. See, there are conflicting stories as to how this car came about and the true original intention of that sweet Yamaha V6. Before we play whodunit with a cult classic, let us first take a look at the vehicle that actually came to fruition, and what makes it such a beloved car.

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EXCLUSIVE: 1991 Ford Taurus SHO W/ Partial Plus Package – Jesse Mortensen @BarnFinds

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The 90’s Taurus SHO will become a future classic I think?

From The Seller: This 1991 Taurus SHO 5-speed was purchased by a Ford employee (Worked for Ford for forty years). He had a small collection of classic Fords and this was one of his daily drivers. It’s all stock with no modifications and was garage kept until last year. It has been under a carport since then. The original owner passed away last year and I purchased the car from the estate. It’s a west coast car with no rust or no sun damage inside or out. I have all records since new. No dents, dings, or paint damage. No interior flaws, or cracks. Nonsmoker, no pets. 100% survivor car. Runs flawless, everything works except the stereo (have not figured out why yet).

Apparently, in ’91 only the Taurus SHO was offered a package called the PLUS package consisting of several cosmetic upgrades. Also offered was a partial PLUS package, meaning it only had a couple of upgrades. 

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1994 Ford Taurus SHO Is Part SHO, Part Truck, And All Weird – Shane McGlaun @FordAuthority

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Sometimes we run across a project car that makes us wonder what people were thinking. Ford has produced vehicles that are part car and part truck in the past in the form of the Ranchero. Those cars have always been polarizing in their styling. If Ford has ever cobbled together a Ranchero in the early ’90s, this may be what it would have looked like.

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