Category: Model A

Prohibition mash: The makings of a prewar sleeper – Daniel Beaudry @Hemmings

Prohibition mash: The makings of a prewar sleeper – Daniel Beaudry @Hemmings

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This is where it starts… the stock 1929 Ford Tudor on the day I took delivery. From here, there will be a series of subtle hop-ups to arrive at a powerful interwar sleeper. Sorry–I couldn’t resist a bit of fun with a sepia-toned filter. Photos by the author except where noted.

A few weekends ago, members of my club generously descended upon my garage for a big “thrash” to help me finish my 1931 Ford Model A/B bobtail speedster. When father-and-son Barnstormers VSC (“Vintage Speed Club”) members Brian and Matthew Cholerton arrived, they were towing my next project: a 1929 Ford Model A Tudor sedan. It came at just the right time, because it would prove a positive counterbalance to some unexpected setbacks with the speedster, validating the wisdom of having at least two vehicles to play with.

For almost as long as I had been working on the speedster, I had known that I also wanted a hot-rodded sedan, so when I discovered that Brian had one and that he was planning on selling, we quickly came to an agreement. He even very generously towed it the 200-plus miles from his home to mine. Though I wasn’t quite mentally or financially ready for it, there it was, exactly what I had been hoping for.

And what I had been hoping for was an affordable Model A Tudor in running condition with a serviceable body, but one that wasn’t rare or in such good condition that it would be a good candidate for restoration. As someone whose tendencies run toward preserving historical artifacts (rather than altering or even restoring them), I knew it would be a long time before I’d find one that fit the bill as well as this one did whenever I finally decided I was “ready” to buy one.

As far as this particular sedan goes, and 1929 Tudors in general, they are indeed special… because with 523,922 of them rolling out of Ford’s factories, they hold the record for the greatest number produced of any Model A in any body style for any year. So this means I don’t have to feel quite as bad about hot-rodding the A, at least from a rarity standpoint

In terms of condition, while it starts up, runs, and stops well, has a remarkably clean underside, and no significant dents or rust, it appears that the owner before Brian might have begun restoring the car but then lost interest and hastily put it back together for sale. So while a new correct “Cobra Long Grain” vinyl top had been installed, many other condition issues went partially or entirely unaddressed.

Most obvious of these: Its paint demonstrates a tendency to chip, its driver’s-side door is significantly out of alignment, and its interior is limited to only seat covers and door panels made from cardboard boxes upholstered in gray crushed velvet (crushed velvet?!). Behind those door panels, the metal window anti-rattlers–both bent, and for some reason at the same angle–had been loosely stashed and, along with one internal upright support with broken rivets, had been creating a significant racket when driving.

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Find of the Day: This Model A-based belly tanker looks the part; now it’s time to make it walk the walk as well – Daniel Strohl @Hemmings

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It’s hard not to see a race car built from a belly tank and get the itch to take it out for a high-speed pass or two at Bonneville or El Mirage; it’s what they’ve always been designed and built to do, after all.

This belly tanker based on a late 1920s Ford Model A for sale on Hemmings.com, however, is a little different, featuring a replica fiberglass tank and fairly stock Model A components that probably wouldn’t make for blistering speeds on the salt flats or dry lakes. But that’s not to say it couldn’t be made into a serious racer or, with some lights and mirrors, a fun little cruiser. From the seller’s description:

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Ford Model A 4-cylinder engine rebuild time-lapse | Redline Rebuilds – @Hagerty

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Half the cylinders, half the work? If only! The flathead four-cylinder engine in our “Swap to Street” 1930 Ford Model A was leaking oil like crazy and wasn’t running particularly well, either.

That made it a perfect subject for our popular Redline Rebuild time-lapse video series. What took us months of long days in the shop is distilled down to a high-paced video that captures EVERY part of the rebuild process.

Get caught up on the details of this build and past builds with our Redline Updates: https://bit.ly/2m4LFqF Wondering where this car came from? We built it! In four days… From parts at a swap meet! Check out that time-lapse video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w59vo…

Using a High Arc Spring Suspension on a Model A Roadster – Tim Matthews @SpeedWayMotors

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Speedway Motors employee Tim M. takes his creativity up a notch with this installment by incorporating a Model A rear crossmember and a high arc spring into his ’29 roadster build. See what Tim goes through to restore the spring and gets it ready to fit on the car.

I’ve always wanted to build an early 50’s style Model A hot rod on a pinched deuce frame incorporating a model A rear cross member and high arch stock spring. I was lucky to find a deal on such a frame that had already been started, but the first owner installed a triangulated four bar rear for a more modern street rod. While they work great, a 4-bar suspension just wouldn’t fit the mid-50’s era build I was aiming for so I decided to remove it. I cut out the 4-bar and replace it with stock parts a builder might have used back in 55. Why use a high arch Model A Ford spring in a 32 frame you may ask? This answer is simple. Forever guys have been doing this to clear a quick change rear end. When I scrounge up enough money for my quick change this rear suspension will not only be period correct; it will also clear the extended case of the quick change but sit just high enough to show it off nicely.

In this article I will document the work done to my rusty 100 year old Model A spring to bring it back to life. I will talk about some important information to keep in mind regarding old springs while also showing some handy items available to make using an old spring easy

I tracked down my Model A spring in an old junk yard back home in South Dakota. The spring was resting in a pile of other parts not far from an original dilapidated Model A frame. I knew I needed a good high arch spring and the rear cross member on the frame looked good so I brought them both home. In thinking about what the roads around America looked like in 1928 it quickly became apparent why so many frames cracked, and also why so many of the original springs took a beating. If you are scrounging original parts like me keep this in mind, and make sure items are free of stress cracks and heavy rust. Most original A springs will be rusty to some degree, but watch for heavy pitting on the flat surfaces between the leaves where moisture would sit.

Cleaning up my old spring was going to take time and patience! If you want to fast forward to another area of your project you could take the easy route here, and simply purchase Speedway Motors replacement high arch spring. Part number 91043102 fits both Model T and Model A, and is hot rod ready! I would recommend that route if time is of the essence

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Emergency/Handbrake Solution

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My Model A had a hydraulic brake conversion done on it before I purchased it, like most things that have been done it’s been pretty poorly executed. The emergency brake has particularly badly done. I looked into trying to make something, but Cling’s Aftermarket in Arizona provide a ready made kit. Even with the shipping it’s a pragmatic solution.

Emergency Brake Kit (Product Code:2004)

With no modification to your Model A, cable simply attaches to the original Emergency Brake Cross Shaft. Fits years 1928 – 1931.Complete kit includes:
  • Mounting bracket
  • Mounting Hardware
  • Cable and ends
  • Cable adjusters

1929 Model A Ford Tudor Sedan For Sale – Update – Now Sold

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My friend John has a 1929 Tudor Sedan for sale, any interest please let me know and I can pass on details.

Update

Solid Body

Good Runner

Four New Tyres

New Windshield & Glass

New Roof Wood & Covering

New Running Boards

New Radiator

New Radiator Shell

New Lights

Six Volt Alternator

Temperature Gauge

Clean Interior

Rebuilt Steering

Rebuilt Brakes

For Sale at £10500

V5 in hand all taxes paid

 

A few little jobs on the Sport Coupe

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Still lot’s of little jobs to do on the Model A, the other day a couple of things got done.

Left hand door had a top cap screw and D Nut missing which meant the door capping lifted at one end.

New D nut and screw and job done, tad rusty at the top of the door but so would you be if you were 89 years old!

Next were the hood bumpers and catch rubbers