Category: V8

V-8 pairs that share displacements but not manufacturers – Diego Rosenberg @Hagerty

V-8 pairs that share displacements but not manufacturers – Diego Rosenberg @Hagerty

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If you’re an AMC owner and get tired of questions like “Why did they install a Chevy engine in an AMC?”, this story is for you. Ditto Studebaker folks who must deal with people asking about the Ford 289 in their Lark.

It wasn’t only Independents who used engines that shared displacements with a mill from another manufacturer, of course. General Motors had several 350- and 455-cubic-inch blocks over the years, though they didn’t always measure exactly as advertised, as we recently laid out in this article. Here are sixengines that shared similar dimensions yet hailed from different manufacturers. We even tossed in a special Mopar example that has long confused enthusiasts.

327

Chevrolet’s 327, which powered the most pedestrian and the most sporting of Bow Ties, is legendary. However, the Chevy was preceded by Rambler’s 327, which debuted in 1957 in the celebrated Rebel. In the Rebel, the 327 put out 255 hp with mechanical lifters, a Carter four-barrel carburetor, and 9.5:1 compression. (A Bendix-developed electronic fuel-injected unit upped the rating to 288 horses but never reached production.)

The Rambler 327 also was available in swan-song Nash and Hudson models but, though it still made 255 hp, featured hydraulic lifters and slightly lower (a half-point less) compression. Alas, the limited-edition Rebel lasted but one year, though the 327 would continue to play the role of AMC’s big gun, powering American Motors’ senior Ambassador models through 1966; for 1965–66, the 327 was also available in mid-size Classic and Marlin models. Kaiser-Jeep also adopted it for several years. Peak horsepower during this era was 270 thanks to a Holley four-barrel and 9.7:1 compression.

In contrast to its Rambler counterpart, Chevrolet’s 327 was a solid middle-of-the-road offering for most of the decade. Debuting for the 1962 model year in full-size and Corvette models, the 327 evolved from the 283 and, in Chevy’s engine hierarchy, sat just below the big-blocks. It came in 250- and 300-horse variants, both of which used four-barrel carbs. In its final appearance in 1969, the 327 was only available in 235-horse, two-barrel guise.

The 327 truly shone in the Corvette. In addition to the 250- and 300-horse pair, Chevrolet also offered 340- or 360-hp versions, the latter sporting fuel injection. Horsepower peaked in 1965 with the 375-horse Fuelie, but the 1965–68 L79 with 350 horses was a popular compromise between horsepower and drivability.

The L79 was also available in the 1965–68 Chevelle (strangely skipping the ’66 model year) and the 1966–68 Chevy II, though the lesser, four-barrel versions were available too

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5 famous V-8s whose displacements stretched the truth – Diego Rosenberg @Hagerty

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We know that the 1960s were full of horsepower hijinks, but did you know that manufacturers sometimes fibbed about the size of their engines? Indeed, that burbling V-8 in your beloved classic may actually not measure up to its promised displacement. We rooted out five of the worst offenders.

Ford/Mercury 427

Available from mid-1963 to mid-1968, the 427 was Ford’s crowning achievement in the 1960s, carrying the torch during Ford’s “Total Performance” reign of global competition. However, to American enthusiasts, the 427 is best known for powering Fords and Mercurys to success on the drag strip and in NASCAR. The FE-series engine was introduced at the same time as Ford’s semi-fastback roofline for the Galaxie 500 and Galaxie 500/XL (as well as Mercury’s Marauder sub-series), and the silhouette’s aerodynamic advantages helped maximize the engine’s performance on the banked ovals. The street 427 was available with either a single or pair of four-barrel carburetors for 410 or 425 horsepower, respectively. Several thousand 427s were built through 1964, with popularity falling drastically in 1965, the last year of big Mercury; in its swan-song year of 1967, the 427 was installed in 89 full-size Fords.

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Early Overhead Valve Cadillac V8 Engines – Hot Rod Engines 101 – @Irontrap Garage

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Another excellent engine 101 video from Matt at Irontrap

One of the most popular engine swaps for early hot rodding has to be the early Cadillac OHV engines.

The 331 was first released in 1949 and was used in hot rods almost immediately. The first generation of engines are almost identical and a vast majority of the parts swap between.

Cadillac’s were known for making good power and torque stock and were quite smooth running engines. Speed equipment can be a little expensive, and hard to find at times.

One of the downsides to the engine is the lack of adjustable rockers, but you can use early aftermarket rockers or stock Studebaker rockers.

There are a lot of great articles written in the vintage magazines about swapping an early ford, and plenty of early hot rods and customs for photo reference. Let us know in the comment section below what Hot Rod Engine we should cover in the series next!

Slammed Ford Flathead V8-powered 1940 pick-up – Craig Parker | Photos: Chris Thorogood, @StreetMachine

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AN ARMY truck that’s been rusting in a shed in Eugene, Oregon, for up to 40 years doesn’t sound like the ideal candidate for a hot rod, but Adam Guglielmi has made it happen.

Read the rest of the article here

I Should Have Hit the Gym Before Driving a 1936 Ford Model 48 – Kristen Lee @Jalopnik

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With its bulbous fenders and vertical grille, the 1936 Ford Model 48 looked like a gangster’s car without a doubt. Something that was used to smuggle liquor during Prohibition. Engaged in police chases and shootouts. Driving it was a blast—and a little bit terrifying as well.

(Full disclosure: I wanted to drive my friend Jessie’s 1936 Ford Model 48 so badly that I asked her and she said yes.)

Read the rest of Kristen’s entertaining article at Jalopnik