Posted in Ford, Model A Ford, Woody

Rare 1930 Ford Model A Woody repairs and back on the road! – Paul Shinn

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Meet “Woody”, a 1930 Ford Model A body style 255-A “Special Delivery”. Sometimes called a “Panel Delivery”. This is a VERY rare Model A body style and a special car because it has belonged to the same man since 1940. ‘Termite bait’ has been off the road about 10 years and it is my job to put it back on the road where it belongs!

Posted in Barn Find Hunter, Hagerty, Tom Cotter, Woody

Devastating LOSS for Classic Car Community: Rare restoration shop burns | Barn Find Hunter – Ep. 107

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In episode 76 of “Barn Find Hunter,” Tom visited Mike Nickels Woody restoration shop and was fortunate enough to see all the patterns, equipment, and projects he was working on. Since then, Mike suffered a devastating fire that brought his everyday life to a screeching halt. Ride along as Tom and Mike walk you through what exactly happened.

Donate here: https://www.gofundme.com/f/mike-nicke…

Article here on Hagerty

Even after a fire destroyed his Michigan workshop, this renowned woody wagon restorer isn’t quitting

Posted in 1935, Ford, Woody

Pick of the Day: 1935 Ford woody wagon sans reference to surfboards – Bob Golfen @ClassicCars.com

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Woody wagons have become emblematic of beach culture, often depicted with surfboards on their roofs even when located in Kansas, but there is certainly so much more to the affection for and collection of vintage woodies than “surf’s up.”

Matter of fact, most woody hobbyists (or “woodie,” as an alternate spelling) must get mighty sick of all the surfer references from bystanders.  I know I would.

Case in point: The Pick of the Day is this lovely 1935 Ford woody 4-door wagon advertised on ClassicCars.com by a dealer in Hailey, Idaho, that never has been nor is expected to ever be connected with surfing

Wood-bodied wagons were classy conveyances back in their day, most often purchased at a premium price by the landed gentry or used as passenger vehicles by premium hotels and resorts.  Wood was no longer a crucial component in the construction of automobiles by the 1920s (not including commercial vehicles), but wood remained popular for charm and aesthetics.

Henry Ford was so certain about the future of wood bodies that in 1920, he purchased 400,000 acres of Michigan forest as a steady source of lumber for Ford vehicles.  In that way, Ford was able to build its own wood bodies in house rather than using outside specialists to supply them, as did most of Ford’s competitors.

This example of a classic Ford woody looks to be in superb condition and with all the right ingredients

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Posted in 1947, 1958, Auction, Auctions, Barrett Jackson, Edsel, Edsel Ford, Ford, Wagon, Woody

Pair of Wagons from Edsel Ford’s Collection Up for Auction – Tom Comerro @Hemmings

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Craig Jackson, Chairman and CEO of Barrett-Jackson, announces the sale of two wagons once owned by Edsel Ford II. Both are to be sold at no reserve by the grandson of the brand’s namesake during the Scottsdale Auction at WestWorld in Scottsdale, Arizona, on March 20-27.

The 1958 Edsel Bermuda wagon features recent restoration work and a transmission swap (from manual to period-correct automatic) carried out by Roush. The rear axle has new seals, bushings, and brakes, while the interior was updated with heat shielding, new carpeting, and seals to make the car more comfortable and inviting. Roush also replaced the original column-shift assembly, while keeping the stock steering column. The proper two-pedal system for automatics of that time was installed, and new control linkage was built.

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Posted in Wagon, Woody

5 Best Woodie Wagons Sold At Worldwide Auctioneers’ 2021 Scottsdale Event (5 Best Woodie Wagons Ever) – Nzilili Sam @HotCars

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Though they have, for long, been extinct in production facilities, woodie wagons are still counted among the most important cars in America’s automotive history. For several decades, woodie wagons were equivalent to the modern day’s high-end SUV. Buyers loved their spacious cabins, and the quality of artistry it took to turn a pile of wood into stylish and durable car parts.

Though genuine woodie wagons fell out of favor with manufacturers and mainstream buyers due to their increasing production cost and a lack of durability, many pre-loved examples were given a second life by classic car lovers and collectors. Some well-kept examples are even exchanging hands for hundreds of thousands, entering the history books of the most expensive cars sold at auctions. Dive in as we look at five of the greatest woodie wagons of all time, versus the five best woodie wagons sold at the recently held Scottsdale sale.

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Posted in Buick, Chevrolet, Hemmings, Oldsmobile, Pontiac, station wagon, Woody

Which one of these four postwar woodie wagons would you choose for your dream garage? – Matt Litwin @Hemmings

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Back in the day, those seeking outdoor adventures may have called upon the station wagon as one means to lug their gear to their travel destination. So, let’s take a step further back in our latest edition of This or That by offering four dream garage options from the immediate postwar station wagon market, when such cars were still built with a healthy amount of lumber. Commonly called woodie wagons, they are among the few vintage cars that are icons of the industry and pop culture alike. Here’s a closer look at some that Detroit offered, all of which are currently available in the Hemmings classifieds.

1947 Chevy Woody Wagon, 350 crate engine, 330hp, power steering, AC/heat, 700R4 transmission, new paint, great driver, eye catcher, award winning car.

Let’s start with Chevrolet. Although the division began offering the all-steel Suburban Carryall in 1935, regular production woodie station wagons didn’t technically appear until 1939. We say ‘technically’ because wood-bodied wagons from Chevy had been available through its dealership network on a special-order basis, with bodies furnished by a number of independent suppliers, such as the Springfield Body Company and Hercules Products.

Like others, Chevrolet’s station wagon production were among the last models to be resumed after the end of World War II. Offered only on the upscale Fleetline series, just 804 were produced as 1946 models, but that number jumped to 4,912 units a year later, this 1947 Fleetline among them. Costing $1,893 new (or $22,626 today), it originally contained the division’s svelte 216.5-cu.in. six-cylinder, which was rated for 90 hp; however this stock-appearing “woodie” has been warmed up a bit with modern mechanical enhancements.

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