Category: Gearbox

Rebuilding a multi disc type Model A transmission – jmodela.coffeecup.com

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The following is a bunch of photos I took while rebuilding a multi disc type Model A transmission, along with illustrations from the service bulletins and ‘The Ford Model A Service Manual and Owners Handbook of Repair and Maintenance’.

There are several differences in the transmission case and internal parts over the years of production.

Read on

Is Amazon Basics Full Synthetic Motor Oil better than Mobil 1? Let’s find out! – Project Farm @YouTube

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I am not sponsored by Amazon, Mobil 1, or Valvoline. I bought all the products for this test using my own money. Dozens of viewers requested this video. I’m not part of the Amazon Affiliate Program either, since I’m not trying to sell products. I do independent testing only.

So, thank you very much for the video ideas, including this one!

AmazonBasics Fully Synthetic Motor Oil better than Mobil 1 Advanced Full Synthetic Motor Oil? In this video, I tested Valvoline 10W-30 Conventional Motor Oil, AmazonBasics Full Synthetic Motor OIl, and Mobil 1 Full Synthetic Motor oil for cold temperature flow, lubricity, evaporative loss after exposure to approximately 400F for 2 hours, and cold flow of each oil after exposed to heat for 2 hours.

Finally, while I don’t have a shop full of expensive oil testing equipment, the testing approach I use helps provide good information on the quality of these oil products. Thank you very much for supporting the channel by watching the commercials and through Patreon support. https://www.patreon.com/projectfarm

Rowing your own: Five things to know about manual transmissions – David Conwill @Hemmings

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Manual transmissions are an icon of the automobile hobby. The ability to operate a car with three pedals sets an individual apart from the mass of drivers who just see cars as point-a-to-point-b transportation. “Driving a stick” lends a certain air of mystery and adventure to a car owner.

Still, how many devotees of the clutch pedal can tell fact from fiction when it comes to the innards of their beloved gearbox? Most of us don’t know a lot more than the number of forward speeds and how many of them are synchronized. It doesn’t need to be that way. The selection, installation, and maintenance of what was once called the standard-shift transmission can be quite straightforward.

From a three-on-the-tree to the seven-speed in a C7 Corvette, all manual transmissions have certain points of commonality. The muscle-car four-speeds of the ’60s and ’70s are likely the most familiar to Hemmings readers, but five-speeds like the Borg-Warner T-5 have been with us nearly 40 years. Even the beloved T-56 six-speed came on the scene in 1992, with the Dodge Viper. That’s a lot of accumulated knowledge. To get the latest information for gearjammers, we consulted with TREMEC dealer Silver Sport Transmissions. Below are five things to consider when contemplating a manual transmission in your ride.

1. Overdrive in Moderation

Historically, a transmission’s top gear transmitted power from the engine in a 1:1 ratio (“direct drive”) where one turn of the engine causes one turn of the driveshaft. Starting in the Seventies and Eighties, however, manual transmissions adopted overdriven top gears, meaning the engine can be turning slower than the driveshaft. When selecting an overdrive ratio, keep in mind that the lower the number, the more overdrive. On a TXK five-speed trans (shown above), the buyer has a choice of 0.81:1, 0.72:1, and 0.68:1, which offer 19-, 28-, and 32-percent overdrive, respectively. Beware of falling into the “more is better” trap, however. As with camshafts and carburetors, too much overdrive will work to your disadvantage. Unless you have an engine built for it, matched to the proper rear-end ratio, you may find yourself lugging the engine in overdrive

2. Keep things in Sync

Steel and brass synchronizers work fine, but for the ultimate in durability or longevity, consider upgrading to carbon

Synchronizer rings and cones smooth the transition from one gear to another, so that you only have to press in the clutch once per shift. They may date back to the 1930s, but they’re not limited to the technology of that era. While traditional brass construction still persists for most applications, Silver Sport’s experts note that they wear faster than some options now available. Worn synchros lose their grip and exhibit crunching where crisp shifts used to be the norm. “If you plan on high-rpm shifts or if you’d like to extend the life of your transmission before it needs a rebuild, carbon-lined synchronizers are the way to go,” said Silver Sport’s Misty McComas. Carbon linings come in both partial and full varieties. With partial (shown above), only the blocker ring or cone is lined, but with full, the whole synchronizer is lined. The latter is recommended for situations where more grip is desired. Even if you’re not power shifting, a harder-wearing consumable means more fun time versus maintenance.

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Why it’s smart to treat your classic to engine-oil analysis – Mark J McCourt @Hemmings

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It’s not just “golden-clear = clean” and “dark-opaque = dirty.” Motor oil is a complex, highly-engineered fluid before it’s even poured out of the container. And after it has been sprayed, dripped, and sloshed around in a running engine for a period of time, coming into contact with multiple materials and wearing surfaces, it holds the secrets of that engine’s overall health. There’s real science behind determining what the chemical and physical composition that oil can tell us. To learn more about this, and share it with you, we’ve tagged along with an enthusiast owner as he explores a new-to-him old-car purchase.

Case study:

Rodney Kemerer bought a Maroon Metallic, five-speed manual-equipped Honda Accord LX brand new in June 1978, when he was living in Pennsylvania. Now a resident of Beverly Hills, California, he has maintained and cherished that two-door hatchback for 43 years, and Rodney knows firsthand how difficult it is to keep the car running and looking factory-fresh, considering the near-total lack of replacement parts. When a virtually identical (save for its paint color, dealer-added accessories, and California-spec emissions controls), running-and-driving ’78 LX came up at an online auction last autumn, he took a chance and bought it, sight-unseen, with the idea that it could be a complete source of parts for his own car.

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Is Synthetic Motor Oil Bad For Old Cars? – Engineering Explained

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Can you use synthetic oil in old cars? Can synthetic oil cause leaks? Sponsored by Mobil 1 motor oil –

We’re tackling many heavily debated subjects about motor oil in this video and learning how specially formulated motor oil can help new and old engines add more miles to the odometer!

Can you use synthetic motor oil in old cars? Can synthetic oils cause leaks in old cars and engines? Where did the idea originate that synthetic oils are not compatible with old engines? If your car is consuming a lot of oil, should you use a thicker oil grade?

Finally, when should you use a high mileage oil? I spent time discussing these questions and more with Mobil 1 engineers. Watch for all the details!

Model B Engine & Gearbox Swap – Evaluate the Gearbox

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As the gearbox will be needed for the swap, it needs to be evaluated and work out what’s missing and what may need to be replaced

One of the key points will be properly identify the gearbox case, gearset, shifter and rear mount.

Here’s an example of some of the differences in the shifter housing from Van Pelt

Investigations begin!

Visit to John’s

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Took a little pre-Christmas visit to my friend John’s and took a look at the progress on his roadster rebuild and the latest parts he has for sale.

The rolling chassis is just about done and the body is underway, next decision is whether to go Patina/Hot Rod or a restoration? Watch this space!

Parts wise there are a good number of engines and gearboxes available both Model A & B

So Begins the Model B Gearbox Conversion

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My friend John Cochran put me in touch with a very nice chap in Scotland named Ian Caldwell who happened to have a Model B gearbox for sale. The Model B gearbox offers the advantage of synchromesh over the Model A by removing the need to double declutch.

Wikipedia description

In a synchromesh gearbox, to correctly match the speed of the gear to that of the shaft as the gear is engaged the collar initially applies a force to a cone-shaped brass clutch attached to the gear, which brings the speeds to match prior to the collar locking into place.

Now I still need to gather quite a lot of extra parts to effect the conversion, these include a clutch pedal, shift lever. I’ll post the progress!

Update on my 1929 Model A Sport Coupe

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Took a couple of days off work and with a huge amount of help from my friend Simon of Simon’s Autos and despite the shocking efforts of Parcelforce and HM Customs (parts held for over 3 weeks despite taking 2 days to get to the UK from Bert’s Model A Center in Colorado) we achieved  quite a bit :

Lunch 🙂

Lunch with Simon and the Model A Ford

Parcel Woes

 

Front Tube Shock Absorber Conversion

Fitted the bracket kit from Bert’s and the Gabriel shocks sourced from US Automotive here in the UK. Pretty much a bolt on apart from drilling the front axle in two places. I have a new rear spring and tube shock absorber brackets for the rear to do in the summer.

Rear Brake Grease Boxes

Those of you that read the blog will know that the car had hydraulic brakes when I purchased it, the conversion was quite badly done in parts so it was upgraded to 1948 parts. I was short of a couple of grease boxes for the rears which I got from the States via eBay for a reasonable price. These were nicely fitted by Simon

Engine Oil Leak

After I changed the sump gasket in the process of cleaning out the years of sludge, I ended up with quite a bad oil leak near the timing gear inspection cover using a combination of gaskets and black RTV. Fingers crossed as it’s OK so far.

Clutch Pedal Modification

Due to my height, (6’4″), and the fact that I have a dropped foot it’s difficult to drive a standard Model Coupe. We came up with a few modifications to help me drive, these are working out quite well so far, still have a bit more to do as the clutch is dragging when hot despite slowing the idle as much as possible making the selection of 1st gear difficult. But it’s a great improvement. I think we’ll still need to design a new thinner seat back to give me a few more inches of room. The modification is done with wood so far to see how it goes. Makes life a easier for me!

Air Filter

John Cochran kindly pointed out that my “A”  has a “B” carburettor, so I treated it to a K&N filter which I think looks OK, car’s not original anyway so 🙂

Transmission & Rear End Oil Change

Thanks to Simon’s space heater and heavy duty pump we managed to get the Morris Lubricants SAE 250 Golden Film gear oil into the gearbox and axle, no mean feat as this is some seriously thick stuff, I can only imagine how thick the 600W spec oil from back in the day actually is!!