Category: Reblog

ONE OLD PROOF SHEET – Pat Ganahl’s Rod and Custom

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I think it’s time for something old. Really old. Like 1930s and pre-War ’40s old. We’re talking Muroc dry lake and the birth of hot rodding–though not by that name, yet. The Southern California Timing Association (SCTA), the first “umbrella” organization gathering dozens of already existing roadster clubs, was formed in early 1938.

Also, for me, it’s time for something a little simpler. It just is. So what I decided to do was another “one proof sheet” column. That is, all the photos you see here today came from one roll of 35mm film, in this case 35 exposures, contact-printed (actual film size) on one 8 x 10 sheet of photo paper. These are analogous to thumbnails on your computer. They’re about an inch wide, and you really need a loupe magnifier to see them clearly.

So I went to my files, opened a drawer marked B&W Negs, and then selected a file marked “Early Lakes.” There were about 100 proof sheets in it. But I know what most of them are, and what I was looking for–an old one with notes written on the back. I’m really not into doing research this week.

I found it quickly, and the first note on the back said, “All photos ’39-’40.”

But a quick scan through them showed me that wasn’t quite correct, since the photo above was listed as “Strokers club from Whittier/La Habra at Irvine Park ’47(?). All cars raced lakes, too.” That’s probably correct. You’ll note all are A and ’32 Ford roadsters. There were more in other shots. And I’m pretty sure this was Frank Currie’s club, and also pretty sure that’s who had all these photos and let me copy them with my camera. Besides building 9-inch Ford rearends, Frank was a consummate hot rodder all his life.

I should also explain that (a) I shot this roll of film, developed it, printed the proof sheet, and wrote the notes on the back 45 years ago. Wish I had a loupe that would sharpen my memory. And (b) not only are some of the notes hard to read, but some photos don’t have any. But given those caveats, let’s just dive in. This will be primarily a picture show, and I’ll relate what I know (or don’t) as we go.

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THE ONCE-REVERED ANTIQUE NATIONALS – Pat Ganahl’s Rod and Custom

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I only did a tiny rant last time. I held most of it in, so to speak. My plan was to let ‘er rip this week. But you know what? We’ve had enough negativity this past year, and I don’t really want to add to that.  My beef, as reflected in the title, is that the Antique Nationals–i.e., nostalgia–aint’ what it used to be. If it weren’t so personally painful, it’d actually be funny. They, and similar current nostalgia drag events, won’t let my historic vintage dragster run down the track because it’s too vintage, too antique! How ironic. If it were obviously unsafe like the dragsters I showed last time, I’d understand. But it’s not. Neither was Chrisman’s Hustler I. But once I calmed down, I realized that the two tracks that most rudely ejected and banned me, Famoso and “Fontana,” are both sponsored by AAA, an insurance company. So more rules, more cost, more hassle, far fewer participants.

This year would have been the 50th Annual Antique Nationals, of course cancelled by Covid. I have to admit I didn’t miss it, and haven’t been the last couple of years. But this used to be one of those once-a-year car events nobody missed, especially if you were into hot rod history–like the L.A. Roadster Show, Old Timers’ Night in Boston, Vintage Night at Ascot, or the first Hot Rod Reunions at Bakersfield and Bowling Green. My memory seems to differ a bit from the official website, but the Antique Nats has definitely outlived four tracks here in SoCal. It started as the Bonnie & Clyde–or “999”–Drags at Lions. Then a small club (about 20 members) dedicated to Model T, A, B, and C Ford engines, Four-Ever-Four, founded the Antique Nationals at Irwindale (I think), in 1970. This was open to ’34 and earlier vehicles only. But soon they included pre-’49 models as long as they ran ’48 and earlier-style engines. This included any Ford flathead V8s, and Chevy/GMC sixes through ’62, so my old ’48 Chevy bomb qualified, and I raced it every year, starting in Irwindale ’til it closed in ’77, then to Orange County (OCIR) ’til it closed in ’83, then to Palmdale until it closed in ’07, thence to “Auto Club Raceway” in Fontana. I am very proud to say I won my class (Inliners) four times, with a special trophy shelf for my four engraved mugs. But perhaps even more prestigious are the special T-shirts with “WINNER” and the year in big letters under the usual logo. You can’t get one unless you win.  I’m saving the three I have left because I wore one completely out.

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Lamar Taylor’s ‘92 Mustang LX Coupe — Reblog From Garage Hot Rods

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Sometimes hot rodding takes a good deal of patience and a little bit of horse trading. That is certainly the case for Lamar Taylor’s 1992 Mustang LX coupe. “I always wanted a coupe,” Lamar told me, “but never could find one I could afford that wasn’t a total project.” So a few years ago, Lamar […]

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Lamar Taylor’s ‘92 Mustang LX Coupe — Garage Hot Rods

Jeffrey Wirl’s ’81 Monte Carlo — Reblog from Garage Hot Rods

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Jeffrey Wirl’s ’81 Monte Carlo

Eighteen-year-old Jeffrey Wirl is a better hot rodder than I was when I was at that age. Back then, I was psyched that I managed to install a set of Accel spark plug wires on my Duster. Jeffrey, on the other hand, is doing an almost complete rebuild of a 1981 Monte Carlo – making […]

Jeffrey Wirl’s ’81 Monte Carlo — Garage Hot Rods

October 1, 1908: Pass Me? Not a Chance — Reblog from Wretched Richard’s Almanac

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Automobiles had been around for decades as we entered the 20th century but they were scarce and rather pricey. That was about to change. On October 1, 1908, a new sort of vehicle hit the streets. Known variously as the Tin Lizzie, Leaping Lena or the Flivver, the Ford Model T was the people’s car, […]

October 1, 1908: Pass Me? Not a Chance — Wretched Richard’s Almanac

October 1, 1908: Ford Motor Company unveils the Model T, the “car of the century“ — Reblog from RANDOM Times

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Hailed as “the car of the century,” the first Model T Ford rolled off the assembly line in Detroit, Michigan, on this day, October 1, 1908. One of the leading executives behind the project, Charles E. Sorensen, was to describe later the eventful day when Henry Ford announced the idea. In his book, “My Forty […]

October 1, 1908: Ford Motor Company unveils the Model T, the “car of the century“ — RANDOM Times •

GM’s Fleeting Fastback Phase: The 1941-52 Streamliners — Reblog Mac’s Motor City Garage

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When the GM streamliners first made their appearance in 1941, they looked like the most advanced cars on the road. But the futuristic shape didn’t age well, lasting barely a decade.

GM’s Fleeting Fastback Phase: The 1941-52 Streamliners — Mac’s Motor City Garage

Streamline Moderne Postwar Good Gulf Service Station — Reblog from The Old Motor

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This impressive Gulf Oil Company service station located in an unknown area of Philadelphia, PA, was designed in the manner of the then-popular Streamline Moderne architecture. This form of building construction was fashionable from the mid-1930s to the ’50s, both here in the US and around the world. The “Good Gulf Nonox” neon sign out…

via Streamline Moderne Postwar Good Gulf Service Station — The Old Motor

The Boys Go Racing — Reblog from Mustang Maniac

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We went racing! The Mustang Owners Club Of Great Britain organised a private meeting at the UK’s premium drag strip – Santa Pod on 31st July 2020. Mustang Maniac and friends attended and the event was at max capacity. The only way to social distance here was to put as much space between your car […]

via The Boys Go Racing — Mustang Maniac