Category: survivor

Ask a Hemmings Editor – What constitutes a survivor? – Daniel Strohl @Hemmings

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Recently, Howard Shaw bought himself a 1948 Buick Roadmaster convertible that he discovered through Hemmings. Congrats, Howard! He plans to pick it up in the near future, so, just like many of us do when we’ve bought an old car, his thoughts are occupied with what he can do with it once he takes possession of it. Howard writes:

The car has never had any bodywork done, and is 100-percent original, including paint, carpets, and running gear. The top was replaced many years ago, and the engine and transmission were overhauled at some time as well. Tires are now radials and are wide whitewalls of vintage wide whites.

My question, after having the top and tires replaced with new, and the engine and transmission rebuilt to factory specs, would you consider the car to be a survivor? I expect to show this car as an original survivor, am I right or wrong?”

Read the interesting response here

Hemmings Find of the Day – 1937 Hupmobile

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This is a truly beautiful vehicle and an amazing survivor, here’s some of the advert description

“completely original, 17,000 mile, rust-free art deco masterpiece. This 1937 Hupmobile Aerodynamic Rumble Seat Model G Coupe is just one of two in existence and is virtually untouched from the day it left the Detroit factory.

Operationally it starts, runs and drives like its brand new. And everything works!”

Take a look at the rest of the advert here

Here’s What it Takes to Bring A Hot Rod Back from the Dead – Tommy Lee Byrd @ Hot Rod Network

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The popularity of barn finds and survivor hot rods has created a whole new segment of the hot rod hobby. Cars with history are much more interesting than something built in the modern era, but we had to convince Charles Berry that his ’34 Plymouth, his high school hot rod, was a really special piece

Read the rest of Tommy’s article here

 

1929 Model A Tudor Barn Find

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My friend has recently imported this 1929 Tudor from the USA, hadn’t run since 1964. A few little adjustments and it runs and drives a treat. It’s a real barn find/survivor!!

You can see the mileages scratched on the dashboard, and you can also see a graffiti style date scratched into the rear quarter panel, great patina