Category: Tucker

Tucker Car #50, the last Tucker automobile ever produced by Preston Tucker! – Preston Tucker’s Speed Shop

Tucker Car #50, the last Tucker automobile ever produced by Preston Tucker! – Preston Tucker’s Speed Shop

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Mike Tucker, Preston Tucker’s great grandson, and Mark Lieberman, owner of Nostalgic Motoring, review the final preparations on Tucker #50 before it is mated to the last Tucker engine ever made (#98). Tucker #50, also know by its VIN #1050, was the last Tucker car produced and was “completed” sometime between December 31st, 1948 and October of 1950. It was sold at the Tucker bankruptcy auction in 1950 without an engine or transmission. Soon, it will be road worthy for the first time!

Who Better to Show Off the Tucker’s Unique Features Than Members of the Family? – Daniel Strohl @Hemmings

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A good portion of the descendants of automotive pioneers probably know about their ancestors’ accomplishments in broad strokes, but the number who can rattle off details about the history and mechanical aspects of the cars tied to their last names is considerably fewer. The Tucker clan, including great-grandsons Mike and Sean, are no strangers to the history and features of Preston Tucker’s eponymous car of tomorrow. They were there when the AACA Museum unveiled its Cammack Tucker collection exhibit, and they’re well conversed in every bit of Preston Tucker’s legacy, as we see from their in-depth videos on a wide range of Tucker topics, from the third headlamp that turns with the wheels to the accessory program to the intricacies of the torsalastic suspension system.

Read on

Seeing really is believing – a Tucker did indeed race in NASCAR, and we found the photo to prove it – Jim Donnelly @Hemmings

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Joe Merola of Braddock, PA entered the Tucker in the 1951 Memorial Day race
One of the things you learn very quickly here is that there’s never any telling what the Hemmings Nation can uncover, especially on this blog. In that spirit, we present this photo, furnished by Ron Pollock of Niles, Ohio. If the name’s familiar, that’s because we recently posted a photo from Ron’s sold-out 50-year history of Sharon Speedway in northeastern Ohio, which depicted a 1961 Chevrolet bubbletop turned into an uncommonly good-looking pavement Late Model.
Ron checked in again this week. The photo above depicts what may be the only Tucker Torpedo ever used in a racing event. He used the image in another book he authored, a history of Canfield Speedway, a half-mile dirt track that operated between 1946 and 1973 at the Mahoning County Fairgrounds, outside Youngstown. Ron was trying to respond to an earlier question on the Hemmings blog about whether a Tucker had ever been raced in NASCAR. The date on the photo suggests it ran at Canfield over Memorial Day in 1951.

1948 TUCKER 48 – Bonhams The Tupelo Automobile Museum Auction 27 Apr 2019

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1948 Tucker 48
Design by Alex S. Tremulis

Chassis no. 1028
Engine no. 335-35
335ci SOHC 6-Cylinder Engine
Single Stromberg Downdraft Carburetor
166bhp at 3,200 RPM
4-Speed Manual Transmission with Bendix Vacuum-Electric Preselector
Front and Rear Independent Torsilastic Suspension
4-Wheel Drum Brakes

*One of the seven Tuckers to undergo endurance testing at the Indianapolis *Motor Speedway
*Mechanically prepared by Tucker expert Richard E. Jones
*Carefully maintained since complete restoration in the 1980s
*Featured in the company’s film Tucker the Man and the Car

AACA Museum, Inc. to present “Tucker – How it All Began” – Kurt Ernst @Hemmings

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Seventy years after the closure of his namesake automobile company, and 63 years after his death in December 1956, Preston Tucker remains a compelling figure in the history of the American automobile. The Cammack Tucker Gallery of the AACA Museum, Inc., in Hershey, Pennsylvania, houses one of the world’s finest collections of Tucker automobiles and memorabilia, and on Saturday, January 26, the museum will present Tucker–How it All Began with marque experts Mark Lieberman and John Tucker Jr., grandson of Preston Tucker.

Read Kurt’s article here

 

Rob Ida Concepts working to recreate Tucker’s last car, the 1955 Carioca – Kurt Ernst @Hemmings

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Preston Tucker viewed failure as a necessary milestone on the road to success. A year after a jury found him not guilty of charges brought by the Securities and Exchange Commission, Tucker was hard at work on a new automobile, courting potential investors in Brazil. Pneumonia, a complication of lung cancer, claimed his life before the car progressed beyond the design stage, but Rob Ida Concepts may soon be bringing the one-of-none Tucker Carioca to life.

Read the rest of Kurt’s article here

The Best of Monterey Car Week Events 2018 – Six Part Series – Dmitriy Shibarshin @WestCoastShipping

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A really good six parter on the events of Monterey Car Week 2018 which inludes some excellent photography.

Part 1 – The Start

Part 2 –  Porsches, BMW’s & Bonhams

Part3 –  Auctions, Lemons and Logistic

Part4 –  The Night Before The Concours

Part 5 – Dawn Patrol

Part 6 – Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance

Tucker club merges with AACA Museum; “Clubs are not what they used to be” – Daniel Strohl Hemmings

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With just a fraction of its peak membership and dwindling engagement, The Tucker Automobile Club of America has reached an existential moment; the official partnership it announced this week with the AACA Museum proposes not only to save the club but also to serve as a prototype for other car clubs nearing their own ends.

Read Daniel Strohl’s article here on Hemmings, this may be the way of things for clubs and museums to thrive in the future?

 

 

 

Rob Ida’s Tucker Torpedo to debut at AACA Museum’s “Night at the Museum” – Hemmings Kurt Ernst

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Rob Ida’s Tucker Torpedo body. The wooden buck was based upon a 3D scan of the original scale model.

 Images courtesy Rob Ida unless otherwise noted.

Before there was a Tucker 48, there was a Tucker Torpedo. The boldly styled coupe, shaped by designer George Lawson, never progressed beyond a quarter-scale model, but that hasn’t stopped Rob Ida, his father Bob, and Sean Tucker, great-grandson of Preston Tucker, from building a full-size version. Read Kurt Ernst’s article here

 

Rob Ida’s Tucker Torpedo body

Tucker Torpedo

Tucker collector David Cammack dies

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Tucker collector David Cammack dies

To own just one Tucker takes a certain amount of luck and determination. To own three – along with the world’s most extensive collection of Tucker memorabilia, Tucker mechanical parts, and most of the Tucker engineering drawings – takes dedication, and nobody in the world showed more dedication to the marque than collector David Cammack, who died Sunday at the age of 84.

As David LaChance related in his profile of Cammack in the June 2007 issue of Hemmings Classic Car, Cammack got his first glimpse of a Tucker in 1948 at the Mayflower Hotel in Washington, D.C. Cammack, then a teenager, had gone to see the prototype, known as the Tin Goose, and its massive 589-cu.in. flat-six engine, but lost interest in the car when the company failed. It wasn’t until 1972 that Cammack, by then a successful real estate investor, bought his first Tucker, number 1022. The other two – numbers 1001 and 1026 – came in quick succession over the next couple of years, but almost more important than the cars were the ephemera that came with them or that Cammack later bought: one of two Tucker test chassis, a variety of prototype and production Tucker/Aircooled Motors engines, and about 50,000 blueprints for just about every component that made up a Tucker. “I don’t think there was any doubt that (Preston Tucker) was serious about building a car,” Cammack told us for the profile. “I think all these drawings provide that.” Over the years he had made attempts at cataloging the entire collection of blueprints and engineering drawings – going so far as to hire assistants for that task – but about 90 percent of the collection reportedly remains uncataloged.