Upgraded 1949 Spartanette travel trailer has Art Deco hotel look and feel with modern comfort and conveniences – Daniel Strohl @Hemmings

Upgraded 1949 Spartanette travel trailer has Art Deco hotel look and feel with modern comfort and conveniences – Daniel Strohl @Hemmings

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While this 1949 Spartanette 24-foot travel trailer listed for sale on Hemmings.com has been thoroughly upgraded, the trailer’s lost none of its vintage charm as a result. Almost all of the upgrades—including new lighting, new electrical, and even a modern bathroom—remain hidden or in keeping with the trailer’s original aesthetics. Additionally, just about everything that one might see or touch while using the trailer still has either an Art Deco or a mid-century jukebox look and feel, largely due to the reuse of the original paneling and fixtures. As a result, it should be reliable and comfortable enough to take on a good long road trip this summer without hesitation. From the seller’s description:

Complete restoration. Trailer, single axle. Looks brand new, new tires, maintained very well, clean title. Approx towing weight: 3,800lbs. Replaced all interior birch paneling. Saved & restored all wood cabinets. Removed all windows, frames – complete rebuild with nickel plating finish. Polished and stored indoors. Original awning steel frame with new sunbrella fabric. New stabilizers. New LED running lights. New SS 50 amp inlet, 50 amp electrical service. New 12V and 100 amp sub panel. New LED puck lighting in cabinets. New 30/40/50/60 amp converter/charger. All new electrical wiring throughout. 50 amp power cord. New LP/CO detector. New A/C – Coleman low profile. Original stove completely restored – re-chromed, re-enameled, new interior parts. New Fantastic vent fan. New 12 gallon electric hot water heater. Restored & repainted original 1949 GM Fridgedaire refrigerator. New LP lines & regulator. New insulation installed throughout. Added a wet shower/toilet room – full stainless steel walls and floor pan. New Marmolium flooring throughout. New upholstery on original Click Clack dining seating. Restored original dining table. New wood venitian blinds

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Our New 1965 Ford F600 Hot Rod Hauler and Swap Meet Truck! @Irontrap Garage

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Since selling the Meat Truck last year, Matt has been searching for a replacement. One of the main things we needed was a larger box for when we vend at swap meets, and the ability to haul hot rods. That combination is extremely hard to find and by some luck we found the perfect truck, except it’s on the complete opposite side of the US. About a week before leaving for our trip to PNW Matt started looking around online at the trucks that were available for sale, and found this perfect truck. This 1965 F600 runs, drives, and has a very unique box that will fit a hot rod perfectly

The Most Iconic Muscle Car Engines – @FastMuscle.com

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The 1960s was a transformational period for the automotive industry as muscle cars became more popularized. The average consumer went from demanding a sleek, high-speed vehicle to requiring more power and acceleration from their cars. It was the dream of every young driver to have a muscle car parked on their front pouch. Those manufactured between the 60s and 70s became very popular because of their exemplary performances on the road. Here are the most popular muscle cars with engines that will blow your socks off

WHAT MUSCLE CAR ENGINES ARE MOST ICONIC?

THE FORD FLATHEAD V8

The Flathead V8 from Ford is among the most iconic old-school muscle cars with an out-of-this-world engine. The first of these ford engines were manufactured in the early 30s, and its improvement spread to the 50s. One of the most significant roles this engine has in the automotive industry is its impact on the hot-rodding culture.

Although the V8 engine featured in this vehicle doesn’t maximize performance, its authenticity and retro style make it outstanding. One aspect distinguishing it from other engines is its intake and exhaust pipes inside the engine block. Most units have these components on the engine’s cylinder heads.

DODGE 426 HEMI

The Dodge 426 Hemi is another high-performance engine featured in several muscle cars. It is a famous unit that guarantees animal-like power under your car’s hood. It was easier to spot a muscle car fitted with this Dodge engine in the 60s and 70s than it is now.

The 426 Hemi compared to other top engines from Dodge, like the 440 V8 manufactured in the same era. The 440 V8 went ahead to replace the 426 Hemi in the market because of its affordability, reliability, and good performance scores.

FORD 302 CUBIC INCH V8

Most of the engines fitted in muscle cars were V8 engines, and so was the Ford 302 engine. It was an outstanding engine dominating the American automotive culture for decades. You can find the engine in modern Ford’s like the Raptor F-150 and Mustang and other Ford units produced in the late 60s.

The 302 V8 engine size is not as substantial as other manufacturers’ units. However, you can achieve higher performance than engines in higher classes with the correct modifications. The base motor reliability and durability of the 302 are forever unmatched.

CHEVROLET LS V8

The Chevrolet LS V8 is an engine featured in several vehicles, including numerous muscle cars. These engines are more compact and lighter than most V8 engine replacement units, making them popular across the United States. Despite its compact size, the power generated from this engine is enough to power your mid-sized SUV. It is an ideal replacement consideration for any V8 Chevrolet engine if you want to save money, although others find it uncreative

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It took a no-holds-barred restoration to turn a patched-up 1929 Model A Standard Coupe into a prize winner – Mike McNessor @Hemmings

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Photography by Matt Litwin; Restoration Photography by Bruce LeFebvre

The Ford Model A’s good looks and low price of admission attracted millions of buyers before and after World War II. In later postwar years, those same qualities made the A one of the world’s most popular collector cars.

As a restoration project, you can’t beat a Model A: They’re simple, they’re supported by a vast network of specialists, and parts are widely available. That’s why hobbyists fixed ’em up decades ago and why many of those same Model A’s are being restored a second or third time by hobbyists today.

Here’s our feature car, circa-2012, as found on eBay by owner Bruce LeFebvre. The exterior looked solid, but the green paint was concealing a lot of makeshift body repair work.

Bruce LeFebvre, the owner/restorer of this month’s stunning Bonnie Gray and Chelsea Blue 1929 Model A Standard Coupe, is a history buff and had always admired the Model A’s styling. “They look cool,” he says. “And Henry Ford was a fascinating character who really put America on wheels.”

Bruce wasn’t what you would call a Model A expert when he started shopping for one of his own about a decade ago, but over the course of this project, he gained a lot of knowledge.

“I didn’t know my ass from my elbow about Model A’s, but I knew I wanted one,” he says. “I saw one online located in a town called Peculiar, Missouri—so I bought it for $6,500, then my friend Roger Parrott and I spent almost 10 days going out and back to get it.”

The coupe’s four-cylinder was treated to a rebuild and pressed back into service. A breakerless ignition stands in for the points and condenser, inside the stock distributor. Period accessory touches include a mount for the oil can and an Auto Lite heater.

Bruce’s reasonably priced, online auction fi nd was a nice-looking car, though maybe a little worn and in need of attention. It had already been converted to hydraulic brakes —a selling point and something which would’ve been on Bruce’s to-do list anyway. Outside, the car wore aged green paint and inside there was what looked like water stains on the upholstery. Some fresh interior pieces, some paint, and some general sprucing should have brought it back to like-new condition — or so Bruce thought. But once back at his shop in Connecticut, a teardown revealed a lot of hidden rust, wood rot, and some hasty body repairs, too.

“When I first saw the car, it didn’t look bad at all,” Bruce says. “But once we started taking it apart—we took the headliner out, the seats out, and the side panels —you could see it was packed with body filler and there was haphazard fiberglass work that looked like bandages holding it together

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Is it a Cord? Is it a Corvette? Or is Marty Martino’s latest creation, the CordVette, the best of both cars? – Daniel Strohl @Hemmings

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For a vehicle that only lasted a couple years on the market, Gordon Buehrig’s Cord 810 and 812 have sure had an outsize influence on car designers and enthusiasts ever since. David North, Stan Wilen, and Bill Mitchell packed the Oldsmobile Toronado with all sorts of design elements paying homage to the Toronado’s front-wheel-drive predecessor. Multiple customizers through the Fifties tried their hand at making a sports car out of the coffin-nose Cord. And on at least three occasions, entrepreneurs have resurrected or attempted to resurrect the Cord. So Marty Martino’s really just following in a grand tradition by building a modern Cord out of the bones of a fifth-generation Corvette.

“I never thought of this project as a ‘sport custom’ in the traditional way, but being that it’s a one-off Cord-inspired design, I now see it as a continuation of the genre,” Marty said after reading our recent story on Fifties-era sport-custom Cords.

The roots of the project date back to the late Eighties, when Automobile Quarterly ran a design contest asking for its readers to envision the Cord 810, Tucker 48, or Packard Caribbean as they would have appeared in 1990. “What really made the contest exciting to me was that it was to be judged by Alex Tremulis, Frank Hershey, Dick Teague, Bill Mitchell, Chuck JordanJack Telnack, and Dave Holls, many of my automotive heroes!” Marty said.

Marty’s updated Cord 810/812 rendering.

Marty selected the 810, and while the phone-dial wheels, wraparound indent, and jellybean taillamps all reflect the era in which he re-envisioned the Cord, the coupe managed to blend the original’s subtly stepped fastback, haunches, hidden headlamps in winglike fenders, and speed line grille in with contemporary shape and proportions. The entry made it into print as one of four runner-up designs that the judges chose. Not bad, Marty thought, considering “most of the entrants were accomplished illustrator/designers, students at Art Center, and so on,” he said.

The rendering got filed away until about a decade ago, when Marty’s younger brother, Robert, expressed an interest in building a modern Cord using a Corvette as the donor car. Robert, according to Marty, “had long held 1936 and 1937 Cords as his favorite prewar car design… and considers the Cord Sportsman the Corvette of its day.”

They figured the fifth-generation Corvette would work best for this project given that Marty had already built the PsyClone Motorama tribute car from a C5 and that both the C5 and the Cord had hideaway headlamps. Robert wanted a convertible, so the brothers found a profile shot of a C5 Corvette, laid it on a lightbox, then drafted the CordVette’s design on a blank piece of paper above the profile shot using many of the same elements and lines that Marty had incorporated into his Automobile Quarterly rendering. Marty also did a little Bondo sculpting on a 1/25-scale model of a C5 to see his alterations in three dimensions.

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Historic Indy Engines – Joe McCollough @SpeedwayMotors

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2022 will mark the 106th running of the Indianapolis 500. Before we watch 33 drivers in their cutting edge wings on wheels scream around the track at 230mph, we always love looking back on how we got here. In this case, we’re going to focus in on a few engines from the Museum of American Speed that highlight a few of the incredible technical advances that have taken place over the years.

Miller Flathead Ford (1935)

This engine lived in what were among the most beautiful cars to ever lap the Brickyard. We’ve talked about the ‘35 Miller Fords before, but we never get tired of looking at the hopped-up flathead Ford that ran Indy. These engines used finned aluminum Bohnalite heads and three-carb manifolds and were remarkably similar to the engines that hot rodders were beginning to stuff in their cut-down T roadsters and Deuce coupes.

We all know how this story ends. In their haste to develop the cars before the ’35 race, the crew managed to overlook a steering knuckle that was perilously close to the exhaust, which eventually took them out of the race. A sad engine for an otherwise great story and a few exceptionally beautiful cars.

Novi (1941-1966)

According to Andy Granatelli, “The Novi did everything but win races.” In fact, they developed a reputation as being cursed; regularly that fastest and most powerful thing on the track, but never actually winning Indy. That didn’t stop them from becoming fan favorites, in large part because these things absolutely screamed. Literally. Not only did the massively oversquare 4-valve DOHC V8 have a sound all its own, but that huge centrifugal supercharger was turning more than 5-times the speed of the engine. That worked out to a 40,000-plus rpm siren that could be heard for miles.

Before it was called the Novi, the platform was developed by businessman Lew Welch, along with engine mastermind Leo Goossen and Bud Winfield. Interestingly, the engine’s first appearance at Indy was in a refugee Miller-Ford (see above). In 1941, this monster was making 450 horsepower, way more than a contemporary Offy, and also more than the old front drive Millers could handle.

Many attempts were made to tame the Novi for Indy, ultimately culminating in the monstrous, 700-horse Granatelli four-wheel-drive cars of the mid-60’s. Crashes and bad luck continued, and the last appearance for a Novi at the Speedway was ’66.

Studebaker Special

More Leo Goossen magic, this time perched atop a stock Studebaker V8 block. We might not all think of exotic, high-winding Indy engines when we think of Studebaker, but Indy legend J.C. Agajanian saw potential and commissioned Goossen to develop this beautiful design. The DOHC heads were designed by Goossen and bolted to the 274-inch stock block Stude. Straight-cut gears spun the cams and it was topped with a Hilborn injector.

The engine was fitted to an Eddie Kuzma chassis with Allen Heath in the driver’s seat. Unfortunately, the rig didn’t get very far; the starter broke the snout off the crank during qualifying.

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Reinstating Vacuum Wipers 1929 Model A Ford Sport Coupe

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As part of the fitting of the Scalded Dog inlet manifold and Stromberg 97 Carb the take off for the vacuum was no longer available in the same manner. The inlet manifold has a blanking plug underneath as standard. This was removed and replaced with a fuel line type fitting to create a vacuum take off of to power wiper motor

A piece of fuel pipe was attached to the fitting and mated with some vacuum pipe fed into the passenger compartment and added to the existing pipework to feed the motor

https://automotiveamerican.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/06/IMG_6356.mov
Here are the results, wiper functioning once again.

Matchless Model AAs – Ford built Model AA trucks in a variety of configurations – Richard Lentinello @Hemmings

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1931 Ford Model AA tanker. Photography by author.

Ford’s handsome little Model A was one of the most successful and popular automobiles of all time. It had the right look, was the perfect size, and priced so the majority of American could afford one.

Although the Model A was only in production for a little more than four short years starting in late 1927 and ending in 1932, nearly five million had been built. What’s more amazing is the amount of different body styles it was available in, including two- and four-door sedans, coupes, phaetons, roadsters and cabriolets, most of which could be had in either standard or deluxe trim. Then there were the trucks.

1931 Ford Model AA fire truck.

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Making an Adjustable Throttle Return Spring for the 1929 Model A Ford Sport Coupe

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After the conversion to the Scalded Dog inlet manifold and Stromberg 97 carb there has been some slight throttle sticking issues. The majority of the issue had been cured by the snap shut device provided by Stromberg

Snap Shut Device

Despite this the throttle still occasionally sticks a little due to the nature of the linkage.

A spring was needed and not one that was too heavy which would add to an already fairly stiff throttle action.

I couldn’t really find what I wanted so I decided to create something out of some small springs that I already had, plus an electrical connector to allow for some adjustment once fitted.

This worked out well and I was able to adjust the tension after fitting. You’ll notice the use of some heat shrink tube to make things look tidy.

So far so good!

Knowing when to walk away: Why I decided not to build my 1921 Ford Model T and what I’ll do instead – David Conwill @Hemmings

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Tilly came home on a trailer, but as of this writing is already a running and driving car. She just needs some help to be ready for the roads of her second century.

Last night, I decided I can’t continue with my Model T project. It’s a tough decision. I’ve wanted a Model T touring car since I was about eight years old (that’s 30 summers now) and I’ve now owned two different touring car bodies and a complete car. I’ve tried really, really hard to make a Model T happen, but it never seems to work out.

If you’ve been following my columns, you know that I’ve been planning to rebuild my ’21 into an early-1930s style hot rod, called a gow job. I’ve wanted a gow since I first learned that hot rodding predated World War II—those cars look awesome and because they’ve got improved power, handling, and braking, they’re a lot more usable than a purely stock 1920s car.

Nevertheless, I’m an adult and not independently wealthy. It’s tough enough to have three kids, a house, and two cars for transportation. A purely “fun” car is great but it would be an irresponsible avenue to continue pursuing–I’ll live off ramen to fund a project, but I won’t ask my family to do that. We have more practical needs to look after first. In fact, I’ll be putting my Model T and parts up for sale soon and putting that money into the home-improvement fund

Our ’08 Charger police car. It has 350 horsepower when it isn’t shutting down cylinders at random. That’s my old ’62 Falcon behind it.

This doesn’t mean I’m done with old cars, though. Far from it. It just means that I’ve got to rethink my driver situation. Our current fleet consists of a 2008 Dodge Charger police car and a 1983 Cadillac Sedan de Ville. The Charger we’ve had for five years, and while it’s fun to drive, it has an increasing number of electrical maladies and has been spending a lot of time in the shop. Once it’s fixed, it can find a new home with someone who enjoys working on late-model Mopars.

The Cadillac we got just last week. It is very cool but I can’t see us keeping it—it’s too nice. That sounds weird, but the biggest problem with the Cadillac is that it was purchased new by my wife’s grandfather the same year she was born. A car with that level of sentimental value is something of a white elephant in and of itself. It only has 23,000 miles on it and it’s a perfectly preserved cream puff. Putting wear and tear on it would be heartbreaking, and fixing all the luxury features as they age would be an utter nightmare. Instead, I intend to polish it up (I’ve been spending a lot of time researching paint care), tune it up, and try to find it a good home before the end of the summer.

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