Ford Mustang – Talking about generations ( from Olek at http://www.autoindigo.com)

Ford Mustang – Talking about generations

Olek from autoindigo has compiled a nice rundown on the various generations of the Ford Mustang, pop over and take a look by clicking here 

There are also some other really interesting articles to be found over at autoindigo

ford-mustang

 

Take to the Floor (From Mustang Maniac)

This week has been busy for the office with the phone ringing constantly, unfortunately most of the esquires again are around our stock levels. For the people who already know how Mustang Maniac Webshop works as an online part supplier, we can only apologise to bring this up again. We can only keep reiterating that […]

via Take To The Floor — Mustang Maniac

Joe Jagersberger (Rajo Joe) Hot Rod Pioneer

img_9761
Joe Jagersberger came to the USA from Austria and began working for Case Corporation in Racine Wisconsin to assist in developing a race car programme.

Whilst working for Case Jagersberger was a regular race competitor including racing at the Indianapolis 500. He continued to race until 1911 eventually becoming victim to a career ending crash after which he spent several months in hospital and resulted in an amputation of his right leg.

Despite his injuries he continued to work at Case as a consultant. He continued to design cylinder heads and other peripherals eventually starting his own company under the famous Rajo brand. The name of the brand was formed from the RA of Racine and the JO from his first name.

Rajo started off by producing spark plugs and various other items. They then moved into producing  performance cylinder heads for Ford Model T and Model A cars.

The first design was the Model 30 which had 4 exhaust ports and one intake port all on the right side of the head. The Model 31 had two intakes on the right and four exhaust on the left. The Model 35C, first known as the “Improved Rajo Valve-in-Head” and later as the Model C had two intakes and three exhausts on the right. The Model A used the stock intake ports on the block. It had two exhaust ports on the right. His Model B two intakes on the right and four exhausts on the left. It came in three versions. The BB featured a higher compression ratio and the BB-R also included two spark plugs per cylinder.

He also offered a modification to the 1941-52 Chevrolet “stovebolt” L6 OHV 15 bolt head, which added another set of 3 intake ports above the 3 originals, to permit adding (an) extra carburetor(s) on a separate manifold.

Jagersberger died in 1952. The company closed in 1980.

Rajo equipment is still very much sought after and command very high prices amongst the traditional hot rod community

321406_1

213458_r_15f26be3271326154521_r_15ea9ec3154545_r_15deec23

Here on Hemmings are some great examples of  period Rajo powered racers

57248580-770-02x

1925 Ford Faultless RaJo Racer

58638614-770-02x

1922 Ford Model T Indy Board Track Racer

There are also some interesting Rajo ephemera items to be found on sites such as eBay

s-l1600

Sources Wikipedia, Hemmings, trackforum.com

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rajo_Motor_and_Manufacturing

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joe_Jagersberger

 

 

 

 

48 Cars in 48 States – Travis Scanlan of Royboy Productions Massive Road Trip

48in48-500x386

Travis’s idea is as follows:

The idea is to take my trusty Galaxie 500 and my new camper “Irene” on a 48 State road trip, in each state I’ll shoot a traditionally styled hot rod, kustom or drag car. At the end of the trip I will create a coffee table book of the entire adventure and hopefully I’ll have added a whole bunch of new members of my rod and kustom family

48c-640x360

You can find Travis’s excellent website here on the site you can find details of the trip, Travis’s podcast Chrome Pipes & Pinstripes and his Photography.

Ford Flathead V8 History – Racing in Retrospect, Mid State Antique Stock Car Club

dsc_1503

 

Really Good series of articles on the various aspects of  Henry’s wonderful Flathead V8 on  the Racing in Retrospect website from the Mid State Antique Stock Car Club.

Read on here

Yattendon Classic Car Day

I took my Dad to his first car show today at the ripe old age of 81!

The show is an annual event in the beautiful Berkshire Downs village of Yattendon, only a few vehicles of American origin but nonetheless a nice local show in a lovely location with proceeds going to support the local Air Ambulance.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

One of the interesting exhibits was a Shelby 350H Mustang Hertz Rent a Racer, this looked genuine but I couldn’t check as I didn’t see the owner in close proximity. Yes, back in the day you could rent one of these beasts from Hertz Rent a Car!

Some background below from Wikipedia, including all shenanigans that went on

1966 Shelby G.T. 350 Hertz models

The deal with the Hertz Corporation to offer ~1,000 G.T. 350s for rental that, after their rental-car lives were finished, were returned to Ford, refurbished, and sold to the public as “G.T. 350H” models.
Most Hertz cars were black with gold LeMans stripes and rocker panel stripes, although a few were white with blue stripes. The first 85 Hertz cars were available with four-speed manual transmissions and Hertz advertised them as “Rent-a-Racer” cars. 
During rental, these cars were sometimes used as production class cars at SCCA events, and were rumored to have been returned to Hertz with evidence of roll bars being welded in.
 Ford pushed another 800 models on Hertz with black paint, gold stripes and black interior, as well as automatic transmissions.

When the Hertz cars were returned to Ford to be prepared for sale to the public, the high-performance parts were often “lost” (presumably at the manufacturer) before final sale.

Other American cars that were on show can be seen below

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

A Chevy Bel Air, Willy’s Jeeps and a Dodge

Crossing the Channel – Replacing 1929 Model A Ford Window Channels

I’ve been meaning to sort out the perished windows channels on the Model A, so I headed over to John Cochran’s for some expert assistance.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Once we had removed the door trims it was very interesting to find the details from the trim manufacturer from 20 years ago! I may research the detail to see if I can get a bead on who owned the car back then. I’ve tried writing to the owner listed on the title but sadly got no reply.

It was great to drive home with slightly less rattles thanks to John!