Tag: 1926

Only at Hershey Will You See a Once-common, Now-rare Car Like This 1926 Chevrolet Superior for Sale on the Street – David Conwill @Hemmings

Only at Hershey Will You See a Once-common, Now-rare Car Like This 1926 Chevrolet Superior for Sale on the Street – David Conwill @Hemmings

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1926 Chevrolet Superior V

Hershey is a lot more diverse than it used to be, but the AACA Eastern Fall Meet remains one of the nation’s premier sources for prewar cars, parts, and automobilia. Case in point is this 1926 Chevrolet Superior V, seen in the car corral at the 2021 Hershey Meet. That’s V-as-in-Victory, not V-as-in-five; preceding Superiors were the 1923 Superior B, 1924 Superior F, and 1925 Superior K. While not outstanding in any particular way, it was the stylish, slightly more luxurious Chevrolet Superior that finally drove the utilitarian Ford Model T out of the market and made way for the ever-popular 1928-’31 Ford Model A.

Because of their wood-heavy construction and middling metallurgy, surviving General Motors products from the 1920s are thin on the ground today, especially the inexpensive Chevrolet cars, which didn’t often see second lives as hop ups or long-lived, Depression-era jalopies. In 2022, most pre-1936 Chevrolet cars are found as piles of rusty sheetmetal and occasionally as preserved engines running sawmills or other improvised machinery. Encountering a solid, nearly complete Chevrolet coupe that runs and drives for under $10,000 is a noteworthy experience, then.

Of course, this car was far from perfect, and was said to be a restoration project (started circa 1994) that originated as a barn find. The upholstery was slightly mismatched and appeared to be rodent damaged, though it wasn’t stained and seemed repairable. The exterior looked good at a glance, in period colors with nicely applied pinstriping, but the finish (apparently lacquer, replicating the original Duco) had cracked and lost adhesion in several places. The car boasted only a front bumper, leading us to wonder whether that was a later addition, or if the rear had been omitted since new. Nevertheless, those were cosmetic issues only and minor—easily overlooked on a car that already ran (nicely, even), drove, and stopped.

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Broken Circa 1928 and Stored Away, This 1926 Buick Standard Only Saw Fleeting Glimpses of the 20th Century Before a 2020 Resurrection – David Conwill @Hemmings

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In 1926, the Buick Standard had been around for a year already. It replaced the Buick Four series for 1925 and was priced below the larger and more powerful Master series. The Standard used a 207-cu.in., 60-hp six-cylinder and rode a 114 3⁄8-inch wheelbase, while the Master had a 274-cu.in., 75-hp six and a 120-inch (or longer) wheelbase. As a two-door sedan, the Standard offered much of the style and build quality of the Master, at a $200 discount (equivalent to nearly $3,000 today).

Those early days of this car’s existence are a bit murky. Bill says the oral history passed down to him, along with the physical evidence uncovered during his efforts to revive the Buick, suggest it was just a few years old when sidelined with a cracked engine block. A fine line is still visible from the resulting repair.

“Most of the miles were put on before 1928. After it was fixed, the original owners placed her in storage. Then came the Depression. She hibernated through World War II, Korea….”

A used Standard Six sedan was a good car in 1928, but nothing ground shaking. Betty must have been in particularly nice condition to get repaired and then stored for what amounts to about three and a half decades. What had once been a common and unremarkable entry-level Buick was, by the early ’60s, an unusual sight.

A farmer in Richmond, Massachusetts, just southwest of Pittsfield, purchased the car around that time.“Other than touch-up paint and typical mechanical maintenance, she was all original,” Bill says. “The intention was to restore her to new condition since she was in such great shape. He started the motor and drove her around the farm to make sure she ran.

“All the parts were there and in perfect condition, but the project was sidetracked by his 1919 Buick roadster project. Betty was sold to a family in Pittsfield in 1968 for $50. I have the bill of sale from that purchase.

Buick advertised its engines as being “triple sealed,” in reference to filtration systems for air, fuel, and oil. Note the canister for the vacuum-operated fuel pump: Gasoline is drawn from the tank to a reservoir, then fed to the carburetor via gravity

“They were able to free her engine, fill the tires, and drove her home from Richmond under her own power. They changed the oil, replaced the horn, and added a brake light switch so they could get an inspection sticker. She still has the Massachusetts inspection sticker from 1970.

“They coated the hood with clear coat, touched up a few places where the paint had chipped, and painted the grille bezel to protect her bare steel. They replaced a couple inner tubes and used the same tires. I presume the tires are ’40s or ’50s vintage. They left the rest of the car as a survivor.

”After some fun in the summers of 1969 and ’70, however, the family wasn’t satisfied with how Betty was running.

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Ford Model T Coast to Coast: A Slow Drive Across a Fast Country – Tom Cotter

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The latest book from the always excellent Tom Cotter of the “In The Barn” series of books and the star of the Hagerty YouTube series “Barn Find Hunter” chronicles his drive across the USA with Michael Alan Ross in a hopped up 1926 Model T Roadster via the Lincoln Highway.

This newly released hardcovers spans 225 pages and is loaded with entertaining stories from the road.

You can purchase a copy here from the Rodders Journal

Hemmings Find of the Day – 1926 Ford Model T lakes modified

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Love this Model T lakes modified for sale on Hemmings

1926 Model T Lakes Modified

“all hand built 6 years ago. Starting with a flawless steel body that was narrowed by 8 ½ inches, the car was modeled to resemble Bo Jones famous modified-style T, although this car is unique and not intended to be a clone. Painted in a brilliant Polyurethane Orange with bright red accents, this car gets noticed anywhere it goes. In addition to the laser-straight body, the exterior features custom aluminum hood and false side panels, Bell-style dropped front axle, Posi rear spring, cut-down windshield, and 1935 Ford wire wheels (rears widened by 2”) wrapped in Coker Firestone Deluxe Champion tires. The interior features a custom-built Swedish Brown Leather Seat, floor shifter, Classic Instruments, removable steering wheel and tan carpet. The unique power train consists of a 4-cylinder Mazda Miata 1.8 liter / 133 HP that is fully chromed and polished and features a custom cut-down manifold. All of this is backed by a close ratio five-speed manual transmission and 1940 Ford Quick Change rear axle”

Read more here