Tag: 1927

With an Offy under the hood, 1927 Ford Model T street rod is one of the few that deserves to wear that track nose – Daniel Strohl @Hemmings

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These days, we’ve become accustomed to track noses as just another option in the sea of hot rod aftermarket items. Sporty, yes, but all too often backed up by an otherwise standard street rod. However, the track nose on this 1927 Ford Model T-based street rod for sale on Hemmings.com is entirely fitting, given that the builder of the car chose to power it with a real-deal Drake Offenhauser dual overhead-camshaft four-cylinder. Once the hood is up, not even the screaming yellow zonkers paint can divert focus away from that jewel of a racing engine, and we’re sure there’s a story about how the engine came to power this car, along with many stories of frightened and delighted passengers who went for a ride thinking it was just a regular ol’ 1-800-street-rod. From the seller’s description

includes: A 255 cu in Drake Offenhauser engine with original magneto and water plumbing system, Dual two barrel Mikuni carburetors, Dry sump oil system, Custom built tube headers and exhaust system, Steel tube chassis, Ford automatic transmission, Ford 9 inch rear end with three link rear suspension with coil over shocks, Front drop chrome axle, Ansen type five spoke wheels CNC profile cut for original machine finish, Wilwood front disk brakes with chassis mounted master cylinder and bias valve, Custom radiator with electric cooling fan, Rear mounted battery with under seat disconnect, Hand fabricated upholstery and carpets, Fiberglass body with aluminum hood, radiator nose and louvered side panels. Car is currently licensed and insured and ready to drive

Read on

Criss-Crossed Conveyors, River Rouge Plant 1927, Ford Motor Company by Charles Sheeler

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A realistic painter as well as a photographer, Sheeler rarely failed to uncover harmonious coherence in the forms of indigenous American architecture. His series of photographs of the Ford plant near Detroit was commissioned by the automobile company through an advertising agency. Widely reproduced in Europe and America in the 1920s, this commanding image of technological utopia became a monument to the transcendent power of industrial production in the early modern age.

Ladle on a Hot Metal Car, Ford Plant 1927

Charles Rettew Sheeler Jr. was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He attended the Pennsylvania Museum School of Industrial Art from 1900 to 1903, and then the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, where he studied under William Merritt Chase. He found early success as a painter and exhibited at the Macbeth Gallery in 1908.[1] Most of his education was in drawing and other applied arts. He went to Italy with other students, where he was intrigued by the Italian painters of the Middle Ages, such as Giotto and Piero della Francesca. Later, he was inspired by works of Cubist artists like Picasso and Braque[2] after a trip to Paris in 1909, when the popularity of the style was skyrocketing. Returning to the United States, he realized that he would not be able to make a living with Modernist painting. Instead, he took up commercial photography, focusing particularly on architectural subjects. He was a self-taught photographer, learning his trade on a five dollar Brownie. Early in his career, he was dramatically impacted by the death of his close friend Morton Livingston Schamberg in the influenza epidemic of 1918.[3] Schamberg’s painting had focused heavily on machinery and technology,[4] a theme which would come to feature prominently in Sheeler’s own work.

Source – Wikipedia

 

Buick Master Six Roadster 1927

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The Buick Master Six was an automobile built by Buick from 1925 to 1928. Before then, Buick was using the six-cylinder 242 engine in their high-end cars and a four-cylinder engine in their smaller, less-expensive cars, but for 1925, they dropped the four-cylinder engine and designed a small six, which they called the Standard 6, to replace that end of the market. They coined the name “Master Six” for the high-end cars, now powered by the 255 engine released the year before.

Read the rest at Wikipedia

1927 Packard Found in Abandoned Philadelphia Factory Sitting for Over 40 Years – IronTrap Garage

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In this episode Matt, Mike, and the team from Cabin Fever Auction Company travel to Northwest Philadelphia to help rescue a 1927 Packard sitting in a closed down Machine shop / Factory since the 1970’s and off the road since the 1950’s. John Paul’s Father has owned this building since the 1970’s and bought the Packard in approximately the 1940’s. The property is being sold and the family wanted help relocating the car to a proper garage so they can attempt to get it road worthy again. We tagged along to document removing the old Packard from it’s tomb.

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