Tag: 1929 Ford Model A

This 1929 Ford Model A Hides Rally Car Mods and a 9,000-RPM Cosworth Engine – James Gilboy @TheDrive

This 1929 Ford Model A Hides Rally Car Mods and a 9,000-RPM Cosworth Engine – James Gilboy @TheDrive

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eing an international-level pro racing driver isn’t half bad, as far as jobs go. Not just because it entails being paid to race, but also because it can involve traveling abroad, which sets the stage for the kinds of magical moments we rarely experience as adults. One such experience can be falling in love—not necessarily with a person, but sometimes an object; an artifact that can take you back to some of the most precious seconds of your life. And after racing Rally Argentina in 1993, one rally driver did just that after stumbling across a 1929 Ford Model A he couldn’t leave behind.

According to a post on Facebook page Apex Automotor, the unnamed driver had the Model A shipped to Finland, suggesting the car’s owner to be the only Finn to enter the rally, four-time WRC champion Juha Kankkunen. Kankkunen’s car or not, they sent the Ford to a Ferrari and vintage car specialist shop Makela Auto Tuning, which stripped the Ford down to its frame before performing a comprehensive restoration and partial modernization.

Read on

Model A Ford Sport Coupe Windlace Challenge Part 3

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Before beginning the removal of the rest of the rivets, I found that the left A pillar windscreen moulding that we originally thought would be difficult to remove proved to be easier than expected, so no need to remove the header rail

Now  it was time to tackle all of the rivets on the left A pillar windlace retainer with the Dremel tool

After masking everything as best possible it took around two hours to grind off the heads off the rivets and then driving out  the remains out with a centre punch. This enabled the removal of the retainer and the remains of the original windlace.

 

 

Starting the Model A Ford

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One of the biggest issues for those not familiar with the Model A Ford seems to be the starting procedure. There are many versions of this but here’s mine.

(Photo from Model-A.org)

  • Make sure the car is neutral and the emergency brake is applied
  • Turn on the fuel tap under the dashboard on the right hand side
  • Set the spark advance lever on the left of the steering column to fully up (retarded)
  • Set the hand throttle to between 1/4 and 1/3 down the quadrant
  • Using the carburetor adjusting rod also on the left hand side of the dash you can choose to turn the rod one full turn to the left to richen the mixture when the engine is cold
  • Turn the ignition key to the on position (in my car also turn on the under hood kill switch)
  • Next pull back on the choke rod whilst pushing your foot down on the starter button with your right foot
  • As soon as the engine fires release the choke and set the spark advance halfway down the quadrant, reset the carburetor adjusting rod back one turn to the right once the engine is warm

 

This is what works for me all A’s are different and you’ll need to adapt and overcome a bit but you’ll soon get the hang of it!

Good instructional video here from Jack Bahm on YouTube

Original 1929 Model A Leatherback idling

Ford’s Model A Sport Coupe caused hysteria throughout the country when it first came out. – BAY AREA NEWS GROUP

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As a have a 1929 Model A Sport Coupe this article peaked my interest 🙂

Almost everyone knows of the Model A Ford. Along with its predecessor, the Model T, the two are probably the most famous of the many cars Ford has produced. More than 15 million Model Ts were built between 1909 and 1927, without a lot of changes. Henry Ford was known as a stubborn man; credit is given to his son, Edsel, for getting Henry to recognize the need to upgrade the product, and the Model A was born.

Read the rest of the article here

 

Classic Car Restoration Tip 4 — Whitewall Preservation – Second Chance Garage

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The latest car restoration tip from Second Chance Garage is how to preserve your whitewall tyres, read the tip here

I can also add what I use to clean my whitewalls which are the Vanish or Mr Clean sponges

You can view the post here

 

A few little jobs on the Sport Coupe

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Still lot’s of little jobs to do on the Model A, the other day a couple of things got done.

Left hand door had a top cap screw and D Nut missing which meant the door capping lifted at one end.

New D nut and screw and job done, tad rusty at the top of the door but so would you be if you were 89 years old!

Next were the hood bumpers and catch rubbers