Tag: 1930

Get Excited for Winter Driving With a Snowbird-Equipped 1930 Ford Model A Coupe – Daniel Strohl @Hemmings

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I’m not advocating that municipalities in northern climes sell their snowplows and let their salt reserve piles dwindle to nothing, but I can imagine winter driving would be far less of a headache in something like this 1930 Ford Model A coupe, complete with a Super Snowbird snowmobile kit, that’s listed for sale on Hemmings.com. Yes, travel would be slower and a bit more arduous, but that’s sort of the point. It would give people pause to consider whether they really need to go out during a snowstorm. Plus, anything to reduce the amount of salt on the roads gets an enthusiastic thumbs-up from me. As for the Model A, it appears to have benefited from periodic restoration and refurbishment but also looks more than capable of taking on unplowed roads with select enhancements to the original tracks-and-skis kit. From the seller’s description

This beautiful Coupe has an Arps snowmobile attachment (Super Snowbird) triple rear axle set up. The standard rear axle has power drive units 5:1 gear ratio attached with internal brakes, The rear axle has paddle tires that fit into the notches of the 14″ wide steel tracks. The Tracks have been sand basted and epoxy primed/ painted. The center axles are idlers in nature and have solid rubber tires. The front rear axle has turn buckle rods to adjust the track  tension. The entire undercarriage is authentic Snowbird and painted the correct color green as original.  The front axle (Model A) has super snowbird flip-up spindles. The front wheels stay on the car with the skis. The tires rotate up and out of the way when on the skis. This coupe has hydraulic cylinders added to assist in the change over so that no jack is required. This system was designed and installed by NH Snocar in New Hampshire.

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The Model A Leafspring Debacle Part 2 – @Astra-Werke

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Part 2 of the rear spring video from Astra-Werke

Only while editing Part 1 did I notice that something was odd about my car’s rear leafspring that I had just fixed. And, yes indeed, after comparing it to photos online, I was missing some spring leaves – most likely the cause for the broken leaf in the first place. So, today, it’s all back apart again to get things sorted once and for all – plus a little extra. Enjoy!

Model A on the DYNO!! – Astra-Werke @YouTube

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This is one of those things that nobody knew they needed to know – so I went ahead and did it. Today, we’ll find out how good (or bad) a performer a bone-stock Ford Flat Four really is. The Company stated 40 Horsepower, nobody ever stated torque figures, and the course of their values over the rpm range remains a secret, too. To this day, that is – enjoy!

What level of involvement did Allegheny have with the stainless-bodied Ford Model A’s? Daniel Strohl @Hemmings

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Let’s be direct for a moment: Some readers last week questioned my use of the term “full set” when describing the stainless-bodied Ford Motor Company products that Allegheny Technologies will put up for auction this fall. As they noted, a trio of stainless-bodied Ford Model A’s preceded the better-known 1936 Ford, 1960 Thunderbird, and 1966/1967 Lincoln Continental. On first blush, it does appear that Allegheny had something to do with the creation of the Model A’s too. Yet after some digging, we find that may not be the case.
To begin with, Allegheny did indeed have a business relationship with Ford Motor Company dating back at least to 1930, when Ford introduced a number of stainless steel items on the Model A. A Ford brochure from the time touted the “greater value” of “rustless steel” as used in the Model A’s headlamps, radiator shell, hub caps, cowl finish strip, gasoline tank cap, radiator cap, taillamp, and other exposed metal parts. “It never requires polishing,” the brochure states. “You merely clean it with a damp cloth as you would a windshield.”

 

Model “A” Fords To Go – Taylor Truck-a-Way Co. – @TheOldMotor

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This load of three new 1930 Model “A” Fords is on a semi-trailer manufactured by the Taylor Truck-a-Way Co. of Los Angeles, CA. At the time, a rig of this type was used for local and regional transport, and long-distance transport of automobiles was handled primarily by train. The lightweight trailer frame is constructed in the form of a lattice truss that is resistant to bending. The lower part of the fifth wheel hitch on the truck is of the conventional type but uses a lightweight horizontal top section, as seen in the second photo below.

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The 1930 Ford Model A Is the Best Way to Appreciate Modern Cars – Altek @YouTube

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It’s easy to expect a lot from automakers these days, but if you want to appreciate anything you’ve ever driven, the 1930 Ford Model A is the car to drive. In the same way I’d want someone to play Atari games to be grateful for what an Xbox One has to offer, everyone should drive one of these to truly be thankful for where we are today.

Really good video that introduces the author to the joys of the Model A, including the mandatory cardboard drip tray!

Related – 1928-’31 Ford Model A

Related – Starting the Model A