Tag: 1938

Cars and Coffee @Richard Edmonds Auctions Chippenham

Cars and Coffee @Richard Edmonds Auctions Chippenham

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Took a trip over to the well known auctioneers Richard Edmonds at Chippenham for a cars and coffee/breakfast event.

Nice turn out of cars and is usual those from the other side of the pond are featured here.

Stunning 1938 Packard One Twenty Convertible

Followed by another convertible, this time a 1916 Hudson

And for good measure a well used but clearly loved Model A Tudor

Something more modern a 2002 Ford F150 Lightning

Also some nice Petrolania

Looking forward to the next auction which is in October

Check here for information

Veteran 1938 Ford Race Car Has Parts From World War Two Bomber -Daniel Patrascu  @autoevolution

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They say veterans proudly wear their scars and decorations for all to see, and that apparently goes for cars, too, not only for the humans that have served in wars.

In the world of cars, only the ones that get to race end up becoming veterans, as you can’t really slap that moniker on your daily. And in most recent times, one didn’t get to look and feel to us as veteran as the Ford we have here.

Born in 1938 in the Blue Oval’s stables, it quickly embraced a racing career, and was often seen doing its thing at the Brewerton Speedway in New York state. It ventured beyond that, from time to time, making its present felt at tracks in Atlanta, Virginia, or South Boston.

As far as we were able to find out, no major name in the racing scene is linked to this Ford, but that doesn’t make it less appealing. Sure, it probably impacts the price, which reads just $15,995, but not its appeal.

Like any proper racer of its kind, the Ford got some of its body parts stripped and others added from place to place. Up front, the exposed sides of the vehicle let the image of a 1949 Ford flathead engine come to light. The powerplant works by means of a Ford truck 3-speed manual transmission and truck differential and breathes courtesy of a new exhaust system.

From the listing

1949 Ford Flathead
Classic Racer

STK 3086 1938 Ford Coupe Race Car

1938 Ford Stock Car #3086

According to lore, and old markings on the car, this classic stock car ran races at the Brewerton Speedway in New York state. At some point, the Ford found its way south to Atlanta and then on to Virginia where it continued to participate in Vintage Races at tracks like South Boston well into the ’90s. This ’38 Ford is a vintage stock car from another era. When the coupe was converted into a race car, the body was moved back 5” on the frame for better weight balance. The exterior’s current respray is white enamel with period correct vinyl logos and numbers. Inside this interior is classic racer. A WWII bomber donated the tub seat/seat belt and the driver compartment is protected by a steel roll cage (no Hans device needed). The dash holds period correct Stewart Warner gauges and the driver’s door is welded shut. A Ford Flathead, circa 1949, furnishes horsepower and is backed by a Ford truck 3-speed manual transmission and truck differential. Other mechanical upgrades include:

• Rebuilt carburetor
• New ignition components
• Rebuilt Ford truck radiator/new hoses
• Rebuilt water pumps
• Manual and electric fuel pumps
• Aluminum fuel tank
• New exhaust system
• New 6 volt battery (positive-ground)
• New master cylinder/wheel cylinders
• Bassett Wide-5 steel wheels
• New Hoosier asphalt tires w/period-correct Firestone logos

The suspension was modified for racing and a competition right front hub has been installed. This old-school Ford stock car will be a fun addition to someone’s collection. The vehicle is sold on a ‘Bill of Sale’. ALL VEHICLES SOLD “AS IS”.

Read on

Streamlines Make Headlines – 1938 – Ford Heritage @YouTube

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This film promotes the aerodynamic Lincoln Zephyr, first launched in 1936. The car was conceived by Edsel Ford and designed by Eugene Turenne Gregorie ,said to be inspired by the Pioneer Zephyr Streamliner train. At the beginning of the film we see other streamline designs in action, including the record-breaking SS Normandie.

Overview[From Wikipedia]

Introduced on November 2, 1935,[3] as a 1936 model, the Lincoln-Zephyr was extremely modern with a low raked windscreen, integrated fenders, and streamlined aerodynamic design, which influenced the name “zephyr”, derived from the Greek word zephyrus, or the god of the west wind. It was one of the first successful streamlined cars after the Chrysler Airflow‘s market resistance, and the concept car Pierce Silver Arrow, which never went into production. In fact, the Lincoln-Zephyr actually had a lower coefficient of drag than the Airflow, due in part to the prow-like front grille on the Zephyr, reflecting the popularity of leisure speedboats like Chris-Craft. The Lincoln-Zephyr succeeded in reigniting sales at Lincoln dealerships in the late 1930s, and from 1941 model year, all Lincolns were Zephyr-based[4] and the Lincoln-Zephyr marque was phased out. Annual production for any year model was not large, but accounted for a large portion of the Lincoln brand’s sales. In its first year, 15,000 were sold, accounting for 80% of Lincoln’s total sales.

Production of all American cars was halted by the Government in 1942 as the country entered World War II, with Lincoln producing the last Lincoln Zephyr on February 10.[5] After the war, most makers restarted production of their prewar lines, and Lincoln was no exception. The Zephyr name, however, was no longer used after 1942, with the cars simply called Lincolns.

The idea of a smaller and more modern luxury car to fill the gap in Lincoln’s traditional lineup was revisited in the 1950 Lincoln Lido (The Lido was the same size as other two-door Lincolns, though[6]), 1977 Lincoln Versailles, 1982 Continental, and 2000 Lincoln LS. The Zephyr name was resurrected in 2006 for the car’s spiritual successor, the Zephyr, which was quickly renamed the MKZ for 2007.

Clarke Gable in his Zephyr

Roadmaster Reborn Part 2 – 1938 Roadmaster Sport Phaeton – Terry Shea @Hemmings

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AN AMATEUR RESTORER LEARNS AS HE GOES IN COMPLETING THIS 1938 BUICK 80-C SPORT PHAETON—PART II

Body and paintwork is not rocket science, but it’s hardly learned in a day, with great results almost always requiring extensive experience. Having worked in the automotive business for more than a decade and a half, first with a NASCAR team and now as part of a multi-state dealer group, Brian DePouli has spent plenty of time around cars, just not a whole lot of time in a paint booth. Still, that didn’t deter him from tackling much of the body and finish work during the restoration of his 1938 Buick Roadmaster 80-C Convertible, a process that we initially covered last month.

Read on here

AN AMATEUR RESTORER LEARNS AS HE GOES IN COMPLETING THIS 1938 BUICK 80-C SPORT PHAETON—PART II

Harvey S. Firestone (Wikipedia)

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On February 7, 1938, automotive industry pioneer Harvey Samuel Firestone, founder of the major American tire company that bore his name, dies at the age of 69 in Miami Beach, Florida.

Firestone Tire and Rubber Company
Subsidiary
Industry Manufacturing
Founded August 3, 1900; 118 years ago
AkronOhioU.S.
Founder Harvey Firestone
Headquarters 200 4th Ave S.,

,

U.S.
Area served
Worldwide
Key people
Products Tires
Revenue  $ 2.09 billion (2004)
Number of employees
40,000
Parent Bridgestone (1988–present)
Website firestone.com

Firestone Tire and Rubber Company is an American tire company founded by Harvey Firestone in 1900 initially to supply solid rubber side-wire tires[1] for fire apparatus,[2] and later, pneumatic tires for wagons, buggies, and other forms of wheeled transportation common in the era. Firestone soon saw the huge potential for marketing tires for automobiles, and the company was a pioneer in the mass production of tires. Harvey Firestone had a personal friendship with Henry Ford, and used this to become the original equipment supplier of Ford Motor Company automobiles, and was also active in the replacement market.[3]

In 1988, the company was sold to the Japanese Bridgestone Corporation.

Harvey S. Firestone
Harvey Firestone (c. 1910)
Born December 20, 1868
Died February 7, 1938 (aged 69)
Occupation Founder of Firestone Tire and Rubber Company
Spouse(s) Idabelle Smith Firestone
Children Harry (April 12–16, 1897)
Harvey, Jr. (1898–1973)
Russell (1901–1951)
Leonard (1907–1996)
Raymond (1908–1994)
Roger (1912–1970)
Elizabeth (1914–1941)

Firestone in 1931

 

Drives ancient “Lizzie” to White House to show Henry Ford.

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Washington, D.C., April 27. His 1921 Model T Ford polished to a mirror like finish, Ernest A. Franke, elderly Washingtonian, drove to the White House executive offices to day with intentions of showing the ancient model to Henry Ford. “Where’s Henry” shouted Franke, from the driver’s seat, “I want to show him his old car”. Police declines to allow Franke to await the arrival of Ford who was due to have lunch with President Roosevelt, 4/27/38

The Buick Y Job, The First Concept Car

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A few years ago I was lucky enough to visit the limted access GM Heritage Collection in Sterling Heights Michigan as a Birthday present.

Trip post here

A recent edition of Jay Leno’s Garage featuring the Buick Y Job reminded of how lucky it was to have been up close to this ground breaking car.

The Buick Y-Job was the auto industry’s first concept car, produced by Buick in 1938. Designed by Harley J. Earl, the car had power-operated hidden headlamps, a “gunsight” hood ornament, electric windows, wraparound bumpers, flush door handles, and prefigured styling cues used by Buick until the 1950s and the vertical waterfall grille design still used by Buick today. It used a Buick Super chassis, indicated by the word “Super” located above the rear license plate. (read the full article here at Wikipedia)

The Y Job is one of the few cars that I have on display at home.

Shay, Pray and the Replica Car Movement Part 2

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The story of Glenn Pray is very different from that of Harry Shay covered in Part 1.

Glenn Pray was a school teacher when he purchased the assets of the former Auburn Cord Deusenberg company back in 1960. Upon the winding up of E.L.Cord’s company back in 1938 the assets had been originally purchased by a Buick dealer from Flint Michigan named Dallas Winslow. Winslow has continued to offer parts and service from the original ACD building in Auburn. Upon purchase Pray moved lock stock and barrel to a former cannery in Broken Arrow Oklahoma and set up in business.

Pray gained a reputation as the foremost supplier of Auburn and Cord parts saving may valuable vehicles in the process, his cannery site becoming a must visit for all enthusiasts of the marques.

Starting in the 1960’s Glenn Pray also introduced what became the first well known replica cars, Pray preferred to call the cars “second generation” this endeavour was not a financial success.  The cars however have gained a cult following and have been recognised by the ACD club fittingly as “The Second Generation Cars”

Sadly Glenn Pray passed away in 2011

You can find a lot more from Chris Summers about ACD and Glenn Pray here

Glenn’s son Doug carried on the business and it was featured on the TV Show American Pickers

You can hear an interview with Doug on Mark Greene’s excellent “Cars Yeah” podcast here

If you ever get a chance to visit the ACD museum grab it with both hands, I visited a few years ago and it’s a wonderful place!

Visit to the ACD 

 

Dream Cars – The Phantom Corsair

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My favourite all time car is the Buick Y Job designed by Harley Earl in 1938, a close second comes the Cord 810/812. However I’m reconsidering after looking into the Phantom Corsair designed by Rust Heinz of the H.J. Heinz family also back in 1938.

The Phantom Corsair

Considering the year of design and manufacture this is an amazing vehicle and a real shame it didn’t make production