Tag: 1997

Project Artemis: A classic Ford F-250 for exploring off the beaten path – Terry McGean @Hemmings

Project Artemis: A classic Ford F-250 for exploring off the beaten path – Terry McGean @Hemmings

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Godzilla goes overlanding

It’s a big, wide world out there, with lots to see and do, but not all of it can be reached via paved highways. The urge to explore has motivated humans for centuries and, even in our highly developed world, there are remote places left undisturbed. But how can you get there for some R&R, and then back to the rat race, inside of your little sliver of time off? The answer lies with “overlanding.

”Though the term isn’t new, in its current use, overlanding describes the growing trend of off-road exploration with motor vehicles where roads, trails, camping grounds, and any other developed facilities are not anticipated. Enthusiasts of this pursuit will tell you it’s all about self-reliance. When you head out into the boonies for an overland excursion, the expectation is that there will be no amenities to rely on where you’re headed. No place to plug in, no drinking water, no place to stock up on supplies—all necessities and provisions must come along for the ride

Our overlanding truck project began with an idea and one of Ford’s Godzilla 7.3-liter V-8 crate engines, but soon snared a subject: A 1997 Ford F-250 four-door 4×4 pickup. KTL Restorations in Danville, Virginia, is handling the build. Photo by Magnified Productions.

An overlanding vehicle needs to be able to traverse highways both legally and in relative comfort, yet it must also be ready to divert to untamed country at a moment’s notice. The suspension and powertrain must be capable of getting through rough terrain, and the vehicle must also provide suitable shelter, with accommodations for sleeping, preparing meals, and whatever else might be needed for extended stays off the grid. Part of what separates overlanding from other forms of camping is that there is no camper—no trailer or RV—just the vehicle you drove in. While many off-roaders set up a camp, overlanders typically use their rigs as the campsite—tents are often mounted to the vehicle, as is much of the needed gear. Setting up and breaking down a camp isn’t conducive to covering a lot of ground—overlanders tend to keep moving during their treks, rather than staying in one spot for several days. Overall, an overlanding vehicle is a versatile, nimble rig that is ready to roll on short notice.

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Project Artemis is go! Introducing our Ford F-Series Overland build – @Hemmings

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Here comes the Hemmings venture into the world of Overlanding! Wikipedia describes it as “self-reliant overland travel to remote destinations where the journey is the principal goal.” Yeah. So, like, what we already do with cars but now with less pavement. We partnered with Ford Performance and KTL Restorations to reimagine a classic truck as the ultimate Overlanding rig that’s as much fun as it is accessible. We combined the monstrous power of Ford’s new 7.3 liter Godzilla crate motor with the timeless good looks of the 9th-gen F-Series, kitted with the latest overlanding gear and a perfect set of custom wheels and earth-trekking rubber.

And we’re about to take you on that journey, the way that only Hemmings could. Project Artemis is go! And if you’re wondering, we named it after the Greek goddess of the wilderness, which seems appropriate. Stand tuned for more articles and videos that tell the story of bringing this truck to life. And if you want to see it in person, we’re targeting the Overland Expo East and 2021 SEMA shows as the first public appearance

We’re well into 2021 – the year after a very strange one. And what have we learned? Well, among other new skills like customizing the background for all our videoconference meetings and learning the Renegade, we figured out how to reinvent travel and get outside in the midst of a global pandemic.

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Twenty years before the FCA-PSA merger, Chrysler tried to build its own Citroen 2CV -Daniel Strohl @Hemmings

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Long before anybody’s wildest imaginations could have conceived of Chrysler (not to mention Dodge and Jeep) becoming part of a multi-national carmaking company that included some storied Gallic brands, perhaps one of the most important Chrysler concept vehicles of the Nineties intentionally evoked the design and feel of one of the most important Citroens of all time.

At first glance, the CCV, introduced at Frankfurt in December 1997, looks like little more than another pre-millennium exercise in retro looks, albeit one that aped a popular car that Chrysler had nothing to do with. By all accounts, Bryan Nesbitt intentionally designed the CCV as an homage to the “Tin Snail” and the name (two Cs and a V), though deployed as an acronym (Composite Concept Vehicle), could hardly be mistaken as anything other than an evocation of the Citroen 2CV.

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Book – Car: A Drama of the American Workplace by Mary Walton

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Book – Car: A Drama of the American Workplace by Mary Walton

Book by Mary Walton on the behind the scenes activity behind the launch of the Ford Taurus, at the time the Taurus is reputed to have saved Ford Motor Company.

The book is an excellent read and pulls no punches…

“An enlightening peek at the inner workings of a large corporation trying to reinvent itself. . . . It’s rare to find an auto book that explains the process of creating a car with so much color and detail.”―Business Week (a Best Business Book of 1997)

Faced with the task of redesigning the Taurus, America’s best-selling car and the flagship of its fleet, Ford Motor Company assembled 700 designers, engineers, planners, and bean-counters under a tough manager who set out to retake engineering and manufacturing ground lost to the Japanese. On their shoulders rested the reputation and the profits of Ford, not to mention an investment of close to 3 billion dollars. This biting, insightful account by a seasoned journalist follows the 1996 Taurus from its conception as a clay model in Detroit to its birth in an Atlanta assembly plant to its public debut in a New Jersey dealership. Mary Walton, who was given unprecedented access to the Taurus team, chronicles brilliantly the clashes between designers and engineers, marketers and accountants, product guys and manufacturing guys to create a revealing portrait of the tension, the passions, and the pride that fuel the race to #1. “An engrossing drama . . . with fascinating insights into every aspect of the car’s creation. . . . Walton does an admirable job of making the redesign of a car into a compelling human-interest story.”―Publishers Weekly (starred review) “An engrossing, satisfying read.”―Doron Levin, Philadelphia Inquirer (a Best Book of 1997) “Vivid and informative. . . . Consistently entertaining because it is engagingly written, this is the rare business book that is a page turner.”―Keith Bradsher, New York Times Book Review 8 pages of plates, photographs

Book available here

Related – Book – The Critical Path: Inventing an Automobile and Reinventing a Corporation by Brock Yates

Upholstery supplier LeBaron Bonney files for Chapter 7 bankruptcy – Daniel Strohl @Hemmings

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Bad news for those in the Model A Ford community, long time upholstery specialist LeBaron Bonney has filed for bankruptcy.

The kit in my 1929 Model A Sport Coupe came from LeBaron Bonney and when I had the door trims off I found the date of manufacture and the names of the persons that built the kit on the back written in chalk from back in 1997! Article is here