Tag: autoevolution

This 1932 Ford Roadster Hot Rod Has Dings Here and There, but They Build Character – Codrin Spiridon @autoevolution

This 1932 Ford Roadster Hot Rod Has Dings Here and There, but They Build Character – Codrin Spiridon @autoevolution

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This 1932 Pete Henderson roadster-inspired hot rod barely has 11 hours to go until it will be sold off at a Bring a Trailer auction. At the time of writing, there are 17 bids, with the last one going for $33,000. It features a steel bodywork finished in matte black, but just as important, it’s running on a 296ci (4.8-liter) Mercury flathead V8. It was originally bought in 2011 and is now up for grabs in Georgia.

It comes equipped with a three-speed manual transmission, 16″ wire wheels painted with typical but mesmerizing white on the sides, it has a rumble seat, a louvered hood to get that pesky Georgia heat out, hydraulic drum brakes, Lincoln-Zephyr carburetors, a Wieand hi-rise intake manifold, a dual-coil distributor, and a swan floor shifter.

Furthermore, it has bucket headlights, a polished windshield frame, and of course, era-appropriate taillights. One important note any potential buyer should know before pulling the trigger on this gem is that the owner replaced the lower body panels in the past. Another and arguably more important detail is that when you look hard enough at the exterior you’ll notice some drilled holes, dings, and dents.

Circling back to its 16″ wheels for a second, supposedly, they have been sourced from a 1935 Ford. Furthermore, the drum brakes also belonged to a 1940s Ford, according to the auction’s description. The tires, however, are Firestone Deluxe Champion whitewalls. The seats come in brown vinyl, and the wheel is a banjo-style DeLuxe.

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1950 Mercury Eight Convertible Flaunts Bored and Stroked Flathead V8, Impeccable Looks –  Aurel Niculescu – @autoevolution

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The Mercury Eight series holds the uncanny honor of being the debut line for the upscale Ford division. It was manufactured between 1939 and 1959 over a total of three generations and sat in between the Ford Deluxe (Custom) and Lincoln.

As such, it was produced both before – when it shared its body with the sibling Ford models and after World War II – when it became the first apparition of the new Lincoln-Mercury Division, thus sharing more traits with Lincoln from then on. As such, it is not just a car but also a statement of history.

Anyway, now is your chance to grab hold of it because New York-based Motorcar Classics says it has a classy 1950 Mercury Eight Convertible for sale, with low mileage and a potential craving for best-in-show accolades. Sitting proudly in the dealership’s inventory in classy dark green over tan and dark green attire, the two-door drop-top “has been lovingly refurbished by a late owner.”

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The V8-60 Engine, Henry Ford’s Baby Often Forgotten by Car Enthusiasts – Silvian Irimia @Autoevolution

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In 1932, the Ford flathead V8 began production when the expression game-changer wasn’t around. Ford’s V8 revolutionized the American automotive industry, forcing all its competitors to switch to eight cylinders mounted in a V shape. However, we are here to talk about the V8-60.

The story of Henry Ford’s genius creation, the 60-horsepower V8, starts earlier than 1937 when it was introduced. In 1934-35, Ford designed and produced a smaller, 2.2-liter power unit of the company’s standard V8 for its European divisions in England and Strasbourg, France. With interesting engineering, this first version featured only two exhaust ports per bank and four main bearings. At the same time, it was full of issues, especially overheating. Consequently, only around 3300 examples were produced, and today only a handful of them still exist.

Still, the effort was not in vain and actually inspired a second redesigned V8 for Europe. Later, in 1937, it was introduced on the United States market as the V8-60. While in Britain, it was commonly known as the 22 hp V8 (in reference to its taxable power rating), the Ford ad writers for the US called it the “Thrifty Sixty.”

The updated V8-60 was an identical and much tinier version of the original flathead Ford V8 introduced in 1932. The displacement was scaled down by Ford engineers from 221 cubic inches (3.6-liter) to a shabby 136 cubic inches (2.2-liter). The power output was 60 hp (61 PS) instead of 85 hp (86 PS) for the old 1937 V8.

One of the particular features of the V8-60 was the front engine support casting, which doubled as the timing cover and mounts for the ignition distributor and twin water pumps. The small and big Ford V8 powerplants are so similar in appearance that ordinary people are often confused. Looking at the head bolts makes it easy to see the difference. The V8-60 has only 17 per cylinder bank, while the big V8 has 21 or 24 fasteners per side. Another interesting and particular feature was the cooling jacket on each bank that was closed out with a sheet metal plate. This metal plate was electrically welded in the proper position.

Ford customers were attracted to the V8-60’s fuel economy, so sales were outstanding initially. However, sales quickly fell as word got out about the engine’s poor acceleration. You see, despite its tiny displacement, the power unit produced 60 hp at 3500 rpm, which for 1937 was quite decent. Unfortunately, the engine had a significant downgrade. The peak torque was less than 100 lb-ft (136 Nm) at 2500 rpm. The available torque was 50 percent behind its V8 larger brother. As a consequence, The V8-60 was discontinued in the USA after 1940, when Ford introduced an L-head straight six engine as its economic engine.

However, this tiny powerplant found its true potential in racing. If you didn’t know, there was a time before and shortly after WWII when American citizens were absolutely captivated by a new racing competition known as the Midgets. In the 1930s and 1940s, these small cars, modeled after their larger siblings from Indianapolis, raced on tracks in baseball and football stadiums on quarter-mile ovals specially built for them

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1951 Ford F-4 Flathead Abandoned in a Barn Roars to Life for the First Time in 50 Years – Humphrey Bwayo @Autoevolution

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Scouting for old rusty relics isn’t something we can all sign up for as a hobby. But for Thomas Mortske of Mortske Repair YouTube channel, it’s a lifestyle he’s unwilling to give up. Together with his loyal ‘Doggo” Duff, the duo will stop at nothing to get a beat-down classic up and running.

Remember the V8-powered go-kart barn find we featured back in August? Well, Mortske went back to his colleague’s barn to pick up the red flathead 1951 Ford F-4 truck that had been sitting in the corner.

This thing has been sitting in the barn. His daughter didn’t remember ever seeing it come out of the barn, so I guess it’s been sitting for at least 20 years, probably closer to 30 or 40 years,” Mortske revealed.

According to Mortske, the truck appeared to have been last regularly used in the early 1970s. The previous owner might have tried to get it running 20 years ago (probably failed).

The 1951 Ford F-4 truck was a first generation of Ford F-Series truck and came with the flathead V8 engine and a 4-speed manual transmission. These trucks were perfect farm hands used for hauling grain, feeds, or ferrying cattle. They came with a hoist and trap door ideal for offloading cargo off the bed.

he interior needed some TLC. The door panels were falling off, and the seats had seen better days.

Luckily for Mortske, the engine turned over when manually pulled, a good sign it would fire up.

The old truck let out a few secrets when Mortske tried firing it up. The starter couldn’t turn, and upon inspection, he discovered someone (the previous owner) had gone all ham on it with a hammer and chisel, tearing up the stamp steel cover.

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Blast From the Past: The 1933 Ford Kamp Kar Was One of the First V8-Powered RVs – Elena Gorgan @Autoevolution

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When Ford introduced the Flathead V8 for the 1932 model year, it ushered in a new era of affordable motoring – one that we’re celebrating throughout the month of September as the V8 swansong. This Ford-based RV known as the Kamp Kar deserves its place in our unofficial V8 hall of fame.

September 2022 is V8 Month here on autoevolution: a month-long celebration of the iconic engine, as it’s preparing for its curtain call after a glorious run. Today’s episode of Blast From the Past brings a V8-powered RV, which also happens to be one of the first with this powerplant produced, an impeccable time capsule, and a slice of RV history.

It’s called the Ford Kamp Kar or the 1933 Ford Runkle Housecar, with the latter name offering some insight into its origin, and the former erroneously leading you to think it had some kind of connection with the Kardashian family, aka the world’s most famous klan for their love of names and words that start with the letter K. Jokes aside, this self-sufficient housecar is on permanent display at the famous Recreational Vehicle / Motor Home (RV/MH) Hall of Fame Museum in Elkhart, Indiana, which also hosts Ford’s first production-series RV and the first-ever motorhomes built.

Walter Runkle of Macomb, Illinois, was a house builder but, for about ten years of his life, he did low-volume production of custom motorhomes. People would bring him automobiles and he’d convert them into tiny houses on wheels using his experience in construction. This unit is a good example in this sense, if not the best, since it was for his personal use: a converted Ford V8 that he’d use between 1933 and 1947 for his yearly winter trips to Florida.

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1947 Ford Super Deluxe Packs Ford Racing Surprise Under The Hood, Oozes Restomod Swagger – Benny Kirk @Autoevolution

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Without further delay, this is a 1947 Ford Super Deluxe. And no, it does not come with curly fries. In fact, in fast food terms, this 1947 Ford’s underpinnings were the equivalent of a wayward fried cheese stick that fell under your seat the last time you went through the Arby’s lord knows how many days ago. In the frankest terms possible, it was warmed-up technology from before the Second World War.

The basis for which this 1947 restomod finds its basis made its debut six years prior in 1941. Why? Well, it was at that time that the United States decided to join the Second World War. Suddenly, factories building cars and trucks for civilians started building tanks, airplanes, and artillery pieces instead. In their day, the 1941 Ford series of cars and trucks came sporting either a 90-horsepower L-head straight six engine or the ever-present Ford Flathead V8. Service engines in their day, but what Roseville Rod & Custom of Roseville, California packed under this one’s hood dwarfs any engine from the 40s.

It’s a modern Ford Racing engine, a 302-cubic inch (5.0-liter) X2302E Boss V8 rocking goodies like forged steel pistons, connecting rods, and hydraulic roller camshaft and Ford Performance cylinder heads similar to those found on a GT40 LeMans racer. Needless to say, it’s packed with technology the average engine designer of 1947 would call witchcraft. Getting everything to work harmoniously required a nearly full body-off-frame job, stripping the car to its bare body shell without its quarter panels and just the bare frame remaining underneath.

From there, Ford Racing 302 V8 is ceremoniously fastened with custom motor mounts to the stock chassis. Don’t be fooled. This isn’t another Art Morrison frame with a classic body on top. There’s even a chassis number you can look up for yourself. With that sorted, a four-speed Ford AOD transmission was paired to the engine. Why? Because as Brian of Regular Car Review once said, “some call it archaic, I call it durable.” Safe to say, an engine this nice deserves a durable gearbox. This leads to a Truetrac 9-inch diff and 3.78:1 gearing

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1932 Ford Model B Truck Rolls Out of Long-Term Storage, It’s a Fantastic Survivor – Ciprian Florea @Autoevolution

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Introduced in 1932, the Ford Model B wasn’t as popular as its predecessors, the Model A and Model T sales-wise. However, it brought a couple of important changes to the company’s full-size car.

While similar to the Model A on the outside, the Model B was a brand-new car riding on an outward curved, double-dropped chassis. But the biggest innovation was the 221-cubic-inch (3.6-liter) flathead V8. The 65-horsepower mill turned the Model B into the first low-priced, mass-marketed car with a V8 engine.

Granted, the V8-powered version was actually called the Model 18, but it was mostly identical to the Model B beyond the engine. The latter came with a 201-cubic-inch (3.3-liter) four-cylinder unit, essentially an upgraded version of the four-banger that motivated the Model A.

Just like its predecessor, the Model B became a popular hot rod platform in the 1930s, so many of them soldiered onto the 21st century with notable modifications. Many of them were also abandoned in junkyards as Detroit rolled out increasingly more powerful cars after World War II, so Model Bs that still have original underpinnings and sheet metal aren’t exactly common nowadays.

Fortunately, some of them managed to survive the test of time and emerge out of long-term storage as mostly original survivors. This 1932 Model B pickup is one of the lucky ones.

The video below shows the truck coming out of an old garage with a thick layer of dust and a bit of rust on its body panels. There’s no word as to how much time it spent in storage, but we’re probably talking about at least a couple of decades. Still, the pickup appears to be in surprisingly good condition beyond a few rust spots, weld marks on fenders, and a few dents here and there.

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Veteran 1938 Ford Race Car Has Parts From World War Two Bomber -Daniel Patrascu  @autoevolution

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They say veterans proudly wear their scars and decorations for all to see, and that apparently goes for cars, too, not only for the humans that have served in wars.

In the world of cars, only the ones that get to race end up becoming veterans, as you can’t really slap that moniker on your daily. And in most recent times, one didn’t get to look and feel to us as veteran as the Ford we have here.

Born in 1938 in the Blue Oval’s stables, it quickly embraced a racing career, and was often seen doing its thing at the Brewerton Speedway in New York state. It ventured beyond that, from time to time, making its present felt at tracks in Atlanta, Virginia, or South Boston.

As far as we were able to find out, no major name in the racing scene is linked to this Ford, but that doesn’t make it less appealing. Sure, it probably impacts the price, which reads just $15,995, but not its appeal.

Like any proper racer of its kind, the Ford got some of its body parts stripped and others added from place to place. Up front, the exposed sides of the vehicle let the image of a 1949 Ford flathead engine come to light. The powerplant works by means of a Ford truck 3-speed manual transmission and truck differential and breathes courtesy of a new exhaust system.

From the listing

1949 Ford Flathead
Classic Racer

STK 3086 1938 Ford Coupe Race Car

1938 Ford Stock Car #3086

According to lore, and old markings on the car, this classic stock car ran races at the Brewerton Speedway in New York state. At some point, the Ford found its way south to Atlanta and then on to Virginia where it continued to participate in Vintage Races at tracks like South Boston well into the ’90s. This ’38 Ford is a vintage stock car from another era. When the coupe was converted into a race car, the body was moved back 5” on the frame for better weight balance. The exterior’s current respray is white enamel with period correct vinyl logos and numbers. Inside this interior is classic racer. A WWII bomber donated the tub seat/seat belt and the driver compartment is protected by a steel roll cage (no Hans device needed). The dash holds period correct Stewart Warner gauges and the driver’s door is welded shut. A Ford Flathead, circa 1949, furnishes horsepower and is backed by a Ford truck 3-speed manual transmission and truck differential. Other mechanical upgrades include:

• Rebuilt carburetor
• New ignition components
• Rebuilt Ford truck radiator/new hoses
• Rebuilt water pumps
• Manual and electric fuel pumps
• Aluminum fuel tank
• New exhaust system
• New 6 volt battery (positive-ground)
• New master cylinder/wheel cylinders
• Bassett Wide-5 steel wheels
• New Hoosier asphalt tires w/period-correct Firestone logos

The suspension was modified for racing and a competition right front hub has been installed. This old-school Ford stock car will be a fun addition to someone’s collection. The vehicle is sold on a ‘Bill of Sale’. ALL VEHICLES SOLD “AS IS”.

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This 68-Year-Old Ford Crestline Looks Almost as Good as a New Car, Needs Nothing – Bogdan Popa @Autoevolution

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Few people remember the Ford Crestline, and really now, you can’t blame them. This model, which was available as a 2-door hardtop and convertible and 4-door sedan and station wagon, was produced for just two years, between 1952 and 1954.

It goes without saying not a lot of them ended up seeing the daylight, with its successor, the well-known Fairlane, eventually becoming a lot more successful.

But given it was manufactured for just a couple of years, the Crestline has become a pretty sought-after model among collectors, especially because finding an example that still has everything is very often mission impossible.

This 1954 Crestline Victoria is, at least at first glance, the dream of many collectors out there.

It comes in incredible condition, and it’s all thanks to how the car has always been stored. eBay seller yellaboimike says the Crestline has been parked in a garage exclusively, so it comes with zero spots of rust or any other metal issues.

Unfortunately, few specifics have actually been provided, so we can’t tell if the car has ever been restored or not. On the other hand, everything looks to be a pretty good condition, and the mileage (66,000 miles / 106,000 km) seems to suggest this is still an all-original Crestline.

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This Stubborn, Hard-Working Ford F-1 Needs a Better Retirement Plan and a New Owner – Tudor Serban @autoevolution

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Every car nameplate has a beginning, and this is where the F-Series from Ford started, in 1948, with the F-1 pickup, a vehicle that made history by becoming the best-selling car in the world.

Just three years after WWII, Ford introduced the F-1 pickup on the market. The vehicle sparked a debate within the carmaker since it was not a truck nor a passenger vehicle. But it was exactly what the customers needed: a light utility vehicle that could take the average Joe to work and back. Soon, this vehicle became the most preferred vehicle by contractors, farmers, and self-employed workers.

While this F-1 pickup is far from what the F-Series became today, it reveals its true nature right from the start. It is definitely not a pampered vehicle. Despite the refreshed red paint, it sports the wear and tear of a working vehicle. It has some scars on the bodywork like it is still employed and works to bring food to the table for the entire family. The bed, although, was refreshed with new planks.

Inside, it is the same story. It’s the kind of cabin that shows boot-prints and worn plastic pieces. But, at first glance, the vinyl upholstery on the bench looks fine. There are some missing parts around, but nothing to worry about. Yet, I would ditch that plastic cup holder, even though it matches the car’s red color.

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