John’s 1929 Tudor Barn Find Update

 

Those of you that have visited the blog before will have seen the post regarding the 1929 Model A Tudor Barn Find that John imported a while back. After some considerable mechanical fettling she’s now a driver!

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Johns Latest Barn Find – Update!

Update on John’s barn find, popped over to see him today, and he’s happily working away on getting the latest find on the road!

Latest Pictures From the UK

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Original pictures from the States

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My good friend Mr Cochran has another really cool Model A barn find.

This time it’s a 1929 Tudor that was sat under a lean to for 25 years!

These pictures are from the previous owners in the States, hope to take some here in the UK soon

Model A Sedan In a Barn Since 1966 and on it’s Way to the UK!

My friend John has another one of his barn finds on the way to the UK from the USA. This time it’s a sedan and has not run since 1966! It’ll be interesting to go and take a look when it lands!

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1929 Model A Tudor Barn Find

My friend has recently imported this 1929 Tudor from the USA, hadn’t run since 1964. A few little adjustments and it runs and drives a treat. It’s a real barn find/survivor!!

You can see the mileages scratched on the dashboard, and you can also see a graffiti style date scratched into the rear quarter panel, great patina

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Another Collection Discovered in NC

From Barn Finds barnfinds.com/

It’s only been a few months since we featured a massive collection of classics that Alan F came across in North Carolina. Well, he has managed to hunt down another horde of cars hiding in North Carolina. This find isn’t nearly as massive as the last one, but there are still plenty of cars here. According to Alan, the owner wants to get rid of everything. Alan offered to help sell it all on eBay, but the owner doesn’t trust computers and decided to just keep offering everything locally. The owner hopes to find homes for everything, but isn’t over the idea of scrapping it all. I would hate to see all these cars and parts crushed for scrap, but if the seller isn’t willing to sell online that might be what ends up happening. Thanks Alan for sharing your find with us!

Read more at http://barnfinds.com/another-collection-discovered-in-nc/#GMFqTEB2kKuPRKOK.99

 

The Silver Dollar in the Barn

This story is from The Corvette in the Barn and it’s a good one. Make sure to signup for email updates so you will be entered in our weekly book giveaway. Also, send in your own find stories because the best one submitted this year will make it into Tom’s next book. Now back to The Silver Dollar in the Barn, enjoy!

For many enthusiasts, the seed for acquiring an old car is planted early in life. A permanent image of a certain car is burned into the hard drive of the brain, and age does not dilute that image. Such was the case with Chris Unger, a car-crazy youth who was exposed to drag racing early in life. “I was thirteen years old when we moved to Orange, California, and my older brother would let me tag along with him on weekends to Lyons Drag Strip in Escondido,” said Unger. “Early on, I heard there was an old A-Gas Willys sitting in a barn somewhere in Escondido. It apparently belonged to an electrician who lived in the area.”

Unger grew up in the heart of drag racing country during the golden era of the 1960s. Like scores of young guys during that time, he was attracted to the pure horsepower and muscle of the A- and B-Gas cars, especially the Willys gassers that were once common. Unger had never actually seen the Willys gasser, but he had heard the rumors that it was put into storage before he moved to Orange. In his mind’s eye, he knew just what it looked like. He knew it was a 1940 Willys pickup truck called the Silver Dollar, so he imagined it was silver in color. And like all proper gassers of the day, it probably had a straight tubular front axle and magnesium wheels.

“So eventually I found the electrician, Mike, and we became friends over the years. At one point as a young fellow, I was even an apprentice electrician for him.” Even though they had become friends, though, Mike never offered to show Unger the Silver Dollar.

Mike had built the Willys from a stock steel truck in 1960 and originally painted it red. According to Unger, it was featured in some early-1960s rodding magazines before some of the steel parts were substituted for fiberglass and it was painted silver. The hood came from Cal Automotive, but Mike manufactured the fiberglass fenders and pickup bed himself and actually made a fiberglass floor panel to cut the weight. Eventually he had it down to about 1,800 pounds.

The Silver Dollar in the Barn.