Tag: Daniel Patrascu

Veteran 1938 Ford Race Car Has Parts From World War Two Bomber -Daniel Patrascu  @autoevolution

Veteran 1938 Ford Race Car Has Parts From World War Two Bomber -Daniel Patrascu  @autoevolution

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They say veterans proudly wear their scars and decorations for all to see, and that apparently goes for cars, too, not only for the humans that have served in wars.

In the world of cars, only the ones that get to race end up becoming veterans, as you can’t really slap that moniker on your daily. And in most recent times, one didn’t get to look and feel to us as veteran as the Ford we have here.

Born in 1938 in the Blue Oval’s stables, it quickly embraced a racing career, and was often seen doing its thing at the Brewerton Speedway in New York state. It ventured beyond that, from time to time, making its present felt at tracks in Atlanta, Virginia, or South Boston.

As far as we were able to find out, no major name in the racing scene is linked to this Ford, but that doesn’t make it less appealing. Sure, it probably impacts the price, which reads just $15,995, but not its appeal.

Like any proper racer of its kind, the Ford got some of its body parts stripped and others added from place to place. Up front, the exposed sides of the vehicle let the image of a 1949 Ford flathead engine come to light. The powerplant works by means of a Ford truck 3-speed manual transmission and truck differential and breathes courtesy of a new exhaust system.

From the listing

1949 Ford Flathead
Classic Racer

STK 3086 1938 Ford Coupe Race Car

1938 Ford Stock Car #3086

According to lore, and old markings on the car, this classic stock car ran races at the Brewerton Speedway in New York state. At some point, the Ford found its way south to Atlanta and then on to Virginia where it continued to participate in Vintage Races at tracks like South Boston well into the ’90s. This ’38 Ford is a vintage stock car from another era. When the coupe was converted into a race car, the body was moved back 5” on the frame for better weight balance. The exterior’s current respray is white enamel with period correct vinyl logos and numbers. Inside this interior is classic racer. A WWII bomber donated the tub seat/seat belt and the driver compartment is protected by a steel roll cage (no Hans device needed). The dash holds period correct Stewart Warner gauges and the driver’s door is welded shut. A Ford Flathead, circa 1949, furnishes horsepower and is backed by a Ford truck 3-speed manual transmission and truck differential. Other mechanical upgrades include:

• Rebuilt carburetor
• New ignition components
• Rebuilt Ford truck radiator/new hoses
• Rebuilt water pumps
• Manual and electric fuel pumps
• Aluminum fuel tank
• New exhaust system
• New 6 volt battery (positive-ground)
• New master cylinder/wheel cylinders
• Bassett Wide-5 steel wheels
• New Hoosier asphalt tires w/period-correct Firestone logos

The suspension was modified for racing and a competition right front hub has been installed. This old-school Ford stock car will be a fun addition to someone’s collection. The vehicle is sold on a ‘Bill of Sale’. ALL VEHICLES SOLD “AS IS”.

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1947 Mercury Eight Is Flathead V8 Greatness With Rare Paperwork – Daniel Patrascu @Autoevolution

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Although probably not as many as rival GM, carmaker Ford has its share of skeletons in the closet. One of them is Mercury, a brand that has been around for about seven decades before being sacrificed to the altar of money-saving

During its time on the market, Mercury was responsible for making vehicles that, in some cases, are still sought after by collectors today. One such vehicle is the iconic Eight, a mid-range machine that came with that irreplaceable feel of classic design, seen on the cars made in the 1940s and 1950s.

The Eight was one of the brand’s heavy hitters and was made in a variety of body styles and rather large numbers. It’s unclear how many of them survive to this day, but if you’re lucky enough to stumble upon one in great condition, expect to pay a fortune for the privilege of owning it.

Lucky or not, we found one, sitting on the lot of cars of a dealer called MaxMotive. It’s a 1947 example, meaning a second generation, and it’s offered, in exchange for $60,750, complete with a very rare and collectible Operator’s Manual.

The car is a convertible, sporting a power-operated burgundy canvas that falls over a gray body and burgundy leather interior with a woodgrain dash.

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Unfinished Custom Indian Motorcycle Packs Ford Flathead V8, and Even Harley Bits – Daniel Patrascu @Autoevolution

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There is no way we can count all the weird machines we’ve seen cooked up by more or less prominent garages across America over the years. Yet we’re pretty certain we’re going to remember this thing here, going forward.

What you’re looking at is officially titled 1938 Indian V8-60 Flathead, and it’s an yet unfinished project that could have just as well been named Ford, or Porsche, or Harley-Davidson. That’s because each of these companies contributed in one way or another to this thing coming together.

Indian is responsible for the frame, with a 1938 Indian Chief as a starting point. It was bred and welded with 1.25- and 1-inch tubing and paired with a Chief front end. The thusly-modified frame was needed because it had to accommodate the Ford V8 engine its builder saw fit to gift the bike with.

The V8 is of the flathead variety the Blue Oval had in its portfolio for a couple of decades between 1932 and 1953, which came with a power rating of 60 horsepower—this bike’s name is beginning to make sense now, right?

The engine used on this two-wheeler is a 1937 model year, packs a Stromberg carburetor, and is tied to a Harley-Davidson transmission and a clutch from the same bike maker.

Two fuel tanks, made to resemble pre-war Indian pieces, are located left and right of the frame, and we’re told they never got the taste of fuel in them. An Indian solo seat dangles precariously over the massive engine, there are 1946 controls on the handlebars, and even a Porsche 12-volt generator in there (not hooked up to anything yet).

1939 Ford Rat Rod Makes Decrepit Look Stunning – Daniel Patrascu @autoevolution

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There is no carmaker out there with as much influence over the custom industry as Ford. The Blue Oval has been making cars pretty much since cars were invented, and that in itself isn’t spectacular. What is amazing is the fact that, unlike the products the competition had to offer back in the early days of the industry, its cars are much more present in certain segments.

Although not limited to Ford, the hot rod and rat rod builders of today do seem to have a soft spot for the Blue Oval machines of old. We talked about many such creations in January, as part of the Ford Month here at autoevolution, but there are so many other builds out there we’ll probably keep bringing them under the spotlight for a long time.

This February, we’re celebrating Truck Month, and there’s no shortage of hot or rat rods in this segment either. For today, we dug up something titled 1939 Ford F1 Rat Rod, presently sitting on the lot of cars being sold by Gateway Classic Cars.

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1946 Ford Pickup Is the Revived Grandfather of Today’s Mighty F-150 – Daniel Patrascu @Autoevolution

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Ford and pickup trucks have gone hand in hand since times immemorial. Starting with the first one the Blue Oval made way back in 1917 (the infamous Model TT) and ending with today’s segment leader that comes in the form of the F-150, trucks have pulled Ford through hell and high water

The modern-day love affair of the public with Ford pickup trucks did not start with the TT, though, but rather with the vehicles the company started making from 1941. We’re talking about the multi-role Ford machine that was offered until 1948 in a multitude of body styles, from 2-door coupe to station wagon. In between, of course, was the pickup truck.

Playing just like the modern-day F-150 in the half-ton segment, that age’s pickup had a number of things going for it, and that made it quite successful in its time. Some people found the trucks worthy enough to have them preserved to this day when they get another shot at life on the custom market.

The one we have here is currently for sale on Bring a Trailer as the perfect re-incarnation of the F-150’s ancestor. Sporting a red body over a gray cloth interior, it looks more alive today than it ever did, thanks to the addition of hardware like steel bumpers, dual side mirrors, and a step-side bed with a wood plank floor.

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1937 Ford Rat Rod Looks so Beat Down It’s Almost Elegant – Daniel Patrascu @AutoEvolution

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Nothing in the world spells rat rod better than the Fords of old. Provided you can get your hands on something from before the war, which has been sitting around unattended for years, and have enough talent to make something ugly look good, then you might have a winner project on your hands.

A custom shop from Florida by the name of Smash Customs did just that, and being gifted with the tools and imagination to make it work, turned a 1937 Ford Phaeton into a rat rod to die for.

Known to its fans as the Rat, the car is currently selling, just like you see it in the gallery above: a beat down exterior, with holes and rust put there by the 30 years it spent in a barn somewhere and strategically kept by the builders.

But as it often is the case with rat rods, the exterior look is deceit in its purest form. A lot of work went into making the aging form of the car a force to be reckoned with, but that was mostly done to the hardware we cannot see.

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1953 Wright Special Race Car Could Have Inspired the Shelby Cobra – Daniel Patrascu @autoevolution

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It may look like it’s made to be soft, both physically and mechanically, but it’s not. This special race car, built on a Maserati chassis born before the second world war, reached back in 1957 quarter mile top speeds of 117 mph (188 kph).

What we have in front of our eyes is called the 1953 Wright Special Race Car, named so after Johnny Wright, the man responsible for coming up with the body of the car. A body that looks as if it’s made of Play-Doh, but is actually a hand-crafted aluminum piece that has a strange familiarity to it.

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