Tag: Deuce Coupe

Uniquely American: THE ONGOING STORY OF THE 1932 FORD “LITTLE DEUCE COUPE” – Jack R. Nerad @JDPower

Uniquely American: THE ONGOING STORY OF THE 1932 FORD “LITTLE DEUCE COUPE” – Jack R. Nerad @JDPower

Advertisements

Not only were songs written about the car, most famously by the Beach Boys, but the ’32 Ford became the basis of a cultural phenomenon (hot-rodding) that spawned a movement (the Youth Culture of the 1960s). And that demonstrates the remarkable “staying power” of this car because even in the early Sixties, it was an antique car enjoying a new life as the emblematic hot rod. Who would guess that the popularity of the ’32 Ford Coupe would still be going strong more than five decades later? 

How popular is it? Evidence of that is as clear and direct as the value NADA Guides lists for a ’32 Ford Coupe today. The car that sold new for $485 in 1932 now commands a retail price as high as $54,000, which turns the term “retained value” on its head. 

From Model T to ’32 Ford Coupe

The story of the 1932 Ford Coupe started in the mid-1920s when uber-industrialist Henry Ford decided that his company would have to replace the Model T, the car that put America on wheels. It was a bold decision because, in 1924, Ford would not only sell its 10 millionth car (in June), but by the time October rolled around, it would sell its 11 millionth, representing an unheard-of sales rate. 

Commanding a solid 50% of the American car market, Ford Motor Company was riding high as its Model T “Tin Lizzy” outsold everything else that moved. Yet Henry Ford could see that the competition was gaining ground rapidly as the company’s signature and only car model became more and more antiquated. The contemporary Chevrolet offered a more powerful 4-cylinder engine with a more modern drivetrain and better chassis than Ford’s rapidly aging Model T, and more expensive mid-priced brands like Nash, Dodge, and Buick were selling cars that were even more refined yet within the price range of middle-class Americans. 

These facts weren’t lost on the public either. In 1926 Ford’s market share plummeted to just 36%. So, even though it had successfully sold nearly 15 million Model Ts, Ford began to develop a new model. 

Since they were starting all over again, Ford decided to call the new car the Model A. As development continued, Henry Ford’s son, Edsel, became the driving force behind the car. He insisted that it have a conventional three-speed, sliding-gear transmission instead of the Model T’s planetary gearset. He pushed for substantially improved engine performance. And he closely directed the chassis and body design to make sure the new car wasn’t just better than the old one but more attractive, too. 

Read on

We borrow the ’32 Ford roadster from the Hagerty ‘library’ – Larry Edsall @ClassicCars.com

Advertisements

We borrow the ’32 Ford roadster from the Hagerty ‘library’

Lately, they’ve taken to referring to the garage where Hagerty keeps its collector cars, maintains those vehicles, and even involves its employees in hands-on restoration projects, as “the library.” That’s because it’s gone beyond a storage facility and mechanical workshop to become a storehouse of knowledge, a place to visit and to learn, to study the evolution of the automobile.

Tommy Fitzgerald, “of most modest means,” reportedly spent a decade or longer collecting genuine parts for the creation in the early 1970s of his ’32 roadster, which was built around an original ’32 Ford frame and roadster body and a 255cid flathead Ford V8 engine.  Many other parts date to that era as well. 

The build also included a genuine S.C. o T. supercharger (made in Italy specifically for American hot rodders), two-speed Columbia rear end, twin chrome Stromberg 97 carburetors, a beehive oil filter, Eddie Meyer aluminum heads, Stellings & Hellings air filters (with the original decals still affixed), the 3-speed transmission from a 1937 Ford with Lincoln Zephyr gears, Stewart Warner gauges with early convex dome glass covers, a Banjo steering wheel, 1937 Ford tail lamps, 1940 Ford brakes, 1932 I-beam front axle stretched by Ed “Axle” Stewart, 1940 Ford hubcaps, 1946-48 Ford 15-inch wheels, and the list goes on. 

Read the article here

We borrow the ’32 Ford roadster from the Hagerty ‘library’

Related – Lew Thompson’s 1932 Ford – from Kustomrama

Deuce grabbed public’s imagination – Pedro Arrais @Times Colonist

Advertisements

Today’s Deuces are less about speed and performance than an expression of vision and personal taste, such as this yellow 32 Ford Roadster. No two cars are alike.

Deuces started off as hotrods, vehicles typically from the 1930s modified for greater speed. The genre originated in the period after the Second World War and continued into the 1960s on a large scale.

Read the rest of the article here

 

 

Rare Vintage Photos of Deuce Roadsters Racing on California’s Dry Lakes – Robert Genat Don Cox – Photographer

Advertisements

The 1932 highboy roadster is an example of the quintessential hot rod. The ’32 highboy was born on California’s dry lakes and refined by young men with skills acquired while serving in the military during WWII. We often think that these cars were just cobbled together in a haphazard manner, but the workmanship on many of them was outstanding.

Read the article and see the rest of the photos here

This is the 1932 Ford that made hot rods famous is heading for auction with Mecum on January 12, 2019 – Calum Brown @Autoclassics

Advertisements

The world’s most iconic hot rod – the ’32 Ford Roadster originally owned by Tom McMullen – is heading for auction with Mecum on January 12, 2019

Read the rest of Calum’s article on the history of this wonderful car here

 

The McGee Roadster : Hot Rod Legend

Advertisements

The McGee Deuce roadster, one of the most iconic hot rods ever, is now the focus of an exciting full-length documentary by the Historic Vehicle Association. Packed with vintage and contemporary action footage, and interviews with guys like Ed Iskenderian, the roadster’s current owner, Bruce Meyer, and TRJ senior contributor Pat Ganahl and senior editor Greg Sharp, the film captures the spirit of the car and the era it was born from. Click here to see a one-minute teaser and the full 20-minute documentary.