Tag: Edsel Ford

As it embarks on its 2nd century, Lincoln brand builds on storied legacy – Phobe Wall Howard @DetroitFreePress

Advertisements

Ford Motor Co. purchased Lincoln Motor Co. out of debt a century ago and established a luxury brand that would forever impact automotive design and pop culture.

Henry Ford, with a nudge from his wife, Clara, and son, Edsel, acquired the company from engineer Henry Leland for $8 million on Feb. 4, 1922.

A photo from 1922 when Ford purchased Lincoln showing Henry Leland on far left, Eleanor and Edsel Ford next to him, then Clara Ford and … Show more   
PROVIDED BY FORD MOTOR COMPANY

“Lincoln is really a chance for us to stop and think about Edsel Ford, who, too often, is overshadowed by his father,” said Matt Anderson, curator of transportation at The Henry Ford museum in Dearborn.

“Edsel Ford had free rein at Lincoln, where he could spread his wings and leave a legacy apart from his father,” Anderson said. “Edsel gave the cars a sense of design and style, and built the company into one of America’s leading luxury automakers.” 

Edsel and Eleanor Ford with a 1922 Lincoln car.  
PROVIDED BY FORD MOTOR COMPANY

High style

Ford introduced the Lincoln Zephyr in 1936, pairing style and aerodynamics

The 1936 Lincoln Zephyr is introduced, Lincoln’s first mid-priced vehicle, with a streamlined, unique design and alligator-type hood.  
PROVIDED BY FORD MOTOR COMPANY

“Its flowing teardrop shape suggests motion. Its V-shaped grille slices the air,” says thehenryford.org museum site. “Headlights blend smoothly into the front fenders. Rear fenders hug the body and fender skirts hide the rear wheels. Even the tail lights are streamlined.”

Then came the Continental in 1939, a car so gorgeous that the Museum of Modern Art in New York City selected it to display as one of eight cars that epitomized design excellence, according to the 1951 MOMA catalogue.

“Henry Ford’s only son played a key role in the creation of what many feel was the most beautiful automobile ever designed,” Ad Age said in 2003.

Read on

Video: The Final Days of Edsel Ford – Mac’s Motor City Garage

Advertisements

First, we owe a big thank-you to automotive historian Bill Munro, who shared the link to this video with us. (See our review of his excellent book Traction for Sale here and check out all his books at his Amazon author’s page here.) Next, we thank the Ford House, the caretakers of Edsel and Eleanor Ford’s beautiful home in Grosse Pointe Shores, Michigan for producing this moving video.

Read on

Edsel Ford, president of Ford Motor Company delivers initial order of 1,500 Jeeps GPWs to the Army – Pacific War Stories @YouTube

Advertisements

Pacific War Stories

President Dwight Eisenhower called the Jeep “one of three decisive weapons the U.S. had during WWII,” and General George Marshall called it “America’s greatest contribution to modern warfare.” The Ford GPW had predecessors in its 1923 4×2 Reconnaissance Car, the Bantam Reconnaissance Car of the American Austin Company, and the Willys MB. Ford’s prototype, the “Pygmy” was approved in 1940. It used a modified Model N tractor motor. The “G” in GPW stood for “Government” contract, the “P” indicated an 80in wheelbase, and the “W” referred to the design and engine licensed from Toledo, Ohio-based Willys-Overland Motors. The original origin of the “Jeep” nickname is debated to this day.”

Opening titles (0:07). Dedication: “This film is respectfully dedicated to the officers and men of the United States Army in the name of American Industry…” (0:27).

A trio of Ford 4×4 Reconnaissance Cars or GPW “Jeeps” exit a Ford River Rouge Plant garage in single file. Edsel Ford, president of the Ford Motor Company delivers the initial order of 1,500 U.S. Army cars to then-Brigadier General Charles H. Bonesteel III, speaking into a WXYZ radio microphone (0:45).

Under a Jeep’s hood, “the final nuts are turned,” putting the finishing touches on a new “scout car” (W-2017422) in a staged photo-op. The front fenders, wheels, grill, and headlights are seen in closeup (1:12).

Edsel Ford and General Bonesteel climb aboard. Ford smiles behind the wheel and reads a prepared statement (1:24).

Ford shifts the GPW into gear and drives ahead (2:09).

A Ford GPW drives wildly across a snowy Michigan winter landscape, bouncing over hills at high speed. Industrial buildings in the background (2:22).

The three vehicles race past an assembled crowd of onlookers, jumping over a bump in the off-road terrain to demonstrate liftoff. The trio drives straight at the camera head-on from two angles (2:37). In a closer view, the 45 horsepower Jeeps skid into a sharp curve and climb muddy hills with ease (3:01).

Ford and General Bonesteel watch approvingly in closeup (4:02). The GPWs drive over weeds and branches up steep hills (4:08). The Jeeps continue proving themselves, circling around warmly dressed officials in the foreground (4:37). A closeup reveals chained tires. The Jeep, driven by a man in aviator’s goggles, brakes, then drives down a steep hill, seemingly unharmed (4:54). A Jeep carrying two passengers bounces up and down a hill in a loop, dodging barren trees (5:15).

A driver and General Bonesteel behind the windshield. Edsel Ford holds onto his hat in the rear seat. The Jeep proceeds more cautiously, and General Bonesteel grips a canvas side panel (5:55). A GPW splashes through a narrow canal filled with water, spraying streams from either front wheel well (6:35).

Another car with two passengers and its hood flipped open, blocking the windshield. Water splashes over the exposed engine. Steam rises, yet the Jeep continues driving on (6:51). More Jeeps “rolling off the assembly line” of the River Rouge Plant. A wider shot reveals the outline of the Rouge plant, and other early 1940s Ford vehicles parked outside. Jeeps drive over railroad tracks (7:10). A seemingly endless stream of Ford GPWs drive forth from a gated service road (7:21). “The End” (7:33).

A Cavalcade of Fords, Ford Heritage Video from 1936

Advertisements

 

This film shows the achievements of Ford in Britain during the 1930s. It includes hill climbs and other reliability tests featuring the Model A, the 8hp and the 14.9hp (“Popular” and “Fourteen”). We also see the building of the Dagenham plant, with the first turf cut by Edsel Ford. NB. This film is silent

A treasure hunt for the Holy Grail Ford – Bill Warner @VinWiki

Advertisements

Bill Warner is the Founder and Chairman of The Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance Foundation and he has spent his life trying to find significant cars. Today he shares the story of his 1934 Edsel Ford Speedster. Learn more about the Bill & the Concours at http://ameliaconcours.org/