Tag: Ford Mustang

Fox Body Mustang: The Complete Breakdown – Sam Weber @Steeda

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There hasn’t been a new Fox Body Mustang in a Ford showroom for almost 30 years, but this third-generation pony car remains popular with enthusiasts and tuners for several reasons. The Fox Body Mustang runs from 1979-1993 model years. And, Mustang lovers appreciate that the Fox Body is:

  • Plentiful: Despite Fox Bodies going back to 1979, cars and Fox Body Mustang parts are readily available.
  • Affordable: The Fox Body offers a reasonably priced Mustang experience for both collecting and modifying.
  • Uncomplicated: The straightforward nature of the Fox Body platform and mechanicals makes for easy repairs and mods.

With this in mind, let’s look at the history of the Fox Body Mustang and its origins. We’ll answer your “what is a Fox Body” questions on Ford’s longest-running generation of Mustang.

The Beginning Fox Body Designs Conflict Through The Years

With this in mind, let’s look at the history of the Fox Body Mustang and its origins. We’ll answer your “what is a Fox Body” questions on Ford’s longest-running generation of Mustang.

1976 Mustang Fox Body Concept Car

Let’s head back to the mid-1970s when the U.S. had just come off the first oil embargo that caused oil prices to increase by 300%. At the same time, the effects of the federal Clean Air Act were imposing stricter emission standards and limiting engine performance. The initial waves of the Japanese auto invasion also gained strength as consumers could choose from import sports cars like the Datsun 240Z.

Add in that the Pinto-based second-generation Mustang II was underwhelming consumers, and Ford executives were undoubtedly enjoying heartburn and sleepless nights. So, the need for a re-invigorated Mustang was paramount for the automaker to stay competitive. The race was on to develop the third-generation Mustang.

It began in 1975 when Ford veteran Jack Telnack was tasked to be the chief designer of the third-gen Mustang. Fresh from his company assignments in Europe and Australia, Telnack had visions of a completely new Mustang with design influences from the Old Continent. At the same time, company honcho Henry Ford II mandated specific body characteristics like a blunt front end from earlier Mustangs.

Fox Body Designs Conflict With Henry Ford II’s Instructions

“Thou shalt never do a slantback front end. Henry Ford II only wants vertical front end, and he’ll show us the door if we ever try anything like it.” Ford vice president of design Gene Bordinat was quoted saying in a 2013 Road & Track article. Further complicating Telnack’s task was the requirement that his new creation uses the new Fox Body platform that would first appear in 1978 with the Ford Fairmont and Mercury Zephyr.

Three separate design teams were formed to develop new looks for the Mustang. This included one group based out of the company’s Ghia design studios in Italy, which Ford had acquired in 1970. Design concepts ranged from a fastback coupe to a Mustang station wagon with “woody” body panels. Yes, there could have been a Mustang wagon.

In a HowStuffWorks story, Telnack recounts how he had to convince Henry Ford II of the proposed Mustang’s aero looks as a better choice than the boxy designs of old Mustangs. “I consider the ’79 Mustang a breakthrough car. It was the first project I worked on when I returned from Europe. It was such a departure from anything we were doing here.” Telnack would later go on to design the groundbreaking 1986 Ford Taurus and its jelly-bean body style.

Fox Body Mustang: Through The Years

The 1979 Mustang launched the Fox Body era for Ford’s pony car. We’ll take a year-by-year stroll through history as we explore Fox Body Mustang specs and other essential details. We’ll also point out many of the horsepower and torque numbers, but if you’re looking for more detail, check out our full breakdown of Fox Body Horsepower & Torque Numbers.

1979 Mustang: Details

Indianapolis 500 Pace Car

Ford opened the third generation of the Mustang for the 1979 model year with a dizzying array of engine choices and a completely new car inside and out. Top power comes from the venerable Windsor 4.9L V-8, making 139 hp and 250 lb-ft of torque with a reported 8.3 second time for a 0-60 run. At launch, other powerplant choices include the Cologne 2.8L V-6 with 104 hp and 150 lb-ft of torque and a 2.3L I-4 with 89 hp and 120 lb-ft of torque. A turbo version of the four-banger was offered, which produced 130 hp and 165 lb-ft of torque.

Midway through 1979, the Cologne V-6 was swapped for a 3.3L straight-six with 89 hp and 143 lb-ft of torque. The Mustang was offered in both notchback and fastback body styles. Be sure to check out the Steeda article revolving around the Notchback vs Hatchback when it comes to Fox Body Mustangs.

Special editions for 1979 include the hatchback-only Cobra, which had the turbo-four under the hood, and the Indianapolis 500 Pace Car replica. The first Mustang Indy pace car since 1964, buyers could choose from the V-8 or turbo-four.

1980 Mustang: Details

M81 McLaren Mustang

The second year of the Fox Body Mustang saw no significant changes other than saying goodbye to the Windsor V-8. This powerplant was replaced with a small-block 4.2L V-8 (a neutered version of the Windsor) that offered only 119 hp and 194 lb-ft of torque.

Special editions for 1980 included a tweaked Cobra that had elements from the ’79 Indy pace car: modified grille, hood treatment, and rear spoiler. Thanks to a $25,000 price tag, only five copies of the M81 MacLaren Mustang were sold. However, the M81 did serve as the foundation for Ford’s special vehicle options (SVO) unit

1981 Mustang: Details

For 1981, Mustang carried with no virtually unchanged other than the addition of a t-top roof option and that the turbo-four was entirely dropped from the engine lineup. Cobra power now comes only from the 4.2L V-8. Interestingly, hatchback sales have now exceeded notchback sales for the first time. The trend will continue for the remainder of the Fox Body generation.

1982 Mustang: Details

To the relief of enthusiasts, 1982 Mustang specs include the return of the Windsor V-8, now called the 5.0 H.O. (high output) engine. At the same time, the Mustang GT is relaunched. This legendary combination is one of the hallmarks of the Fox Body Mustang, although the 5.0 could be ordered as a stand-alone option. All things seemed right with the world as the new engine was rated for 157 hp and 240 lb-ft of torque. Ford reworked the Mustang’s trim levels with the base L available only in the notchback, while the upscale G.L. and GLX could be ordered in either body style. The 2.3L four-cylinder and the 3.3L straight-six carried on unchanged.

1983 Mustang: Details

Turbo GT

1983 marks important updates to America’s favorite sports car. After a decade-long absence, a Mustang convertible is returned to the lineup, while a mid-cycle refresh included a new front end and updated taillights. Improvements continue for the Fox Body Mustang as the 5.0 engine now makes 175 hp and 245 lb-ft of torque. The Essex 3.8L V-6, with 112 hp and 175 lb-ft of torque, becomes the sole six-cylinder engine for the Mustang.

Special editions include the Turbo GT, which saw the return of a boosted four-cylinder engine making 145 hp and 180 lb-ft of torque. Thanks to less power and a higher price than the 5.0, the Turbo GT never took off.

1984 Mustang: Details

20th Anniversary Fox Body

There were no significant changes for 1984 among standard Mustangs. The base L model could now be ordered in either notchback or hatchback body style and the mid-tier G.L. and GLX models were blended into a single LX trim. In addition, the Essex V-6 became standard equipment for the convertible.

1984 is perhaps most memorable for special-edition Mustangs. Beyond the carryover Turbo GT, buyers could choose the memorable SVO Mustang (with a turbo four-cylinder making 175 hp and 210 lb-ft of torque) or the 20th Anniversary GT (with a choice of non-SVO turbo four or the 5.0L V-8).

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The Pony Express Ford’s Mid-engine Mustang – The Real Back Story – Michael Lamm @TheAutoChannel

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Author Michael Lamm recounts the development of Ford’s 196 Mustang the first mid-engine throust toward Total Performance.

People have tried for years to weave a connection between the Ford Mustang I-the knee-high 2-seater in which Dan Gurney lapped Watkins Glen in 1962-and the production Mustang that came out in May 1964.

Well, forget it. There ain’t no connection, or at best precious little. Other than the name, the horsey emblem, and the side scoops, the Mustang I didn’t contribute to the production car in any rational way. The little Mustang I did lead Ford into the GT40 program, though, and was emblematic of a performance and marketing bonanza that soon became known as Total Performance.

The Mustang I was created, it turns out, as an early component of Ford’s Total Performance buildup. According to retired Ford engineer Robert D. Negstad, who worked on the Mustang I and was later part of the team that developed the 7-liter Shelby Cobra, “The people who came out of (the Mustang I group) went on to win Le Mans…. They learned their craft and their skills in that Mustang I project. It was a labor of love….”

Horse of a Different Color

To begin at the beginning, around 1960 a Ford product planner named Don Frey became disturbed that the company was losing its performance image, especially among younger buyers. Hotrodders had given up the flathead Ford V8 in favor of smallblock Chevys and Chrysler Hemis. Sports-car enthusiasts were buying imports and Corvettes. Ford was becoming an old-maid car company.

So Frey expressed his concern to Robert S. McNamara, Ford’s car and truck VP, and to Henry Ford II, the company president. Frey also rallied a number of other Ford executives, key among them vice presidents Gene Bordinat (design) and Herb Misch (engineering). Frey’s message, in effect, was “Hey, fellas, we’ve got a marketing problem. Let’s do something to polish up Ford’s styling and performance

Designer Bordinat immediately got busy. Ford’s studios were turning out an armada of showcars-as many as one a week, most of them fiberglass rollers minus powertrains. Often these projects came in response to design competitions routinely held among Ford’s various studios. But for a competition in January 1962, Bordinat asked his styling chiefs to submit concepts for something new: a small, no-holds-barred sports car.

One of the designers was John Najjar, now retired after a career with Ford going back to the late ’30s. “We had a studio under Bob Maguire,” Najjar explains, “and in it were Jim Darden, Ray Smith, plus an artist, Phil Clark, several modelers, and me. We drew up a 2-seater sports car in competition with the other studios, and when they saw ours-saw the blackboard with a full-sized layout and sketches- they said, ‘That’s it! Let’s build it.’ So we made a clay model, designed the details, and then built a fiberglass prototype.” This car was simply a concept study rather than the final configuration, but it included a lot of the sporty, rakish flair the later showcar embodied.

With the performance kettle starting to simmer in Dearborn, VP of Design Bordinat decided to take this 2-seat concept further and build it into a showable prototype. To that end he invited his opposite number in engineering, Herb Misch, to come over and take a look.

Misch got excited as well, and he selected a special-projects wizard named Roy Lunn to head up the creation of a complete prototype. Lunn would act as liaison between the styling and engineering sides and oversee the building of the car.

By now it was early May of ’62, and the car had even earned a name: Mustang, suggested by John Najjar. Ford insiders actually referred to it as the Mustang Sports Car, and it wasn’t until the 4-place 1963 Mustang II concept car came out that people began calling the 2-seater Mustang I retroactively.

The Mustang I advanced quickly from concept sketches to package drawings conforming with the engineering specifications that were being laid down simultaneously. Najjar recalls that his studio’s full-sized drawings contained the suggestion of a tubular spaceframe, and Ray Smith, the studio engineer, added the popup headlights, retractable license plate, fixed seats, and adjustable-reach steering and pedals.

Fueled primarily on enthusiasm-the budget for the project being virtually nonexistent-in short order Ford had a fiberglass prototype of their 2-seat sports car. Initially no one knew whether the prototype would be developed into a runner or not, but by mid-summer Misch and Bordinat decided that in either case they wanted to display the car at the US Grand Prix at Watkins Glen on 7 October 1962.

At that point the project still had no budget and only the fuzziest of goals: to show up at Watkins Glen on race day. But on that goal alone Roy Lunn quickly assembled a team and dedicated them to building a finished showcar in the remarkable time of just 100 working days.

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Prototype Mustang built for Henry Ford II: See what makes it so UNIQUE | Barn Find Hunter – Hagerty Media

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Tom Cotter has shifted gears for the latest episode of Barn Find Hunter, leaving dusty sheds and rusty sheetmetal in favor of a tour of Detroit landmarks and some noteworthy cars that were designed, engineered, and built in and around the Motor City. His first vehicular deep dive is a look into the history of a very special 1965 Mustang that was built for and owned by Henry Ford II.

The car in question has been owned by Art Cairo, a longtime Ford employee who bought the unique pony car 45 years ago for just $500. Cairo had the car restored and replaced any rotted sheetmetal with new-old stock that he went to great length and expense to track down, making sure that this piece of history is still all Ford.

Cairo shows Tom some of the unique details that set this coupe apart from the millions of other Mustangs built in the ’60s. Perhaps most apparent is the leather interior, which wasn’t offered on early Mustangs. The door jamb also reveals chrome door strikers and a nicely finished seam where the jamb meets the quarter panel rather than a clear overlap and spot welds.

There are also several less-obvious, telltale signs that this wasn’t a run-of-the-mill pony car. For example, the back of the instrument cluster has “Henry Ford’s car” hand-written in marker and there’s a scatter shield bolted to the transmission tunnel. Under the hood is a high-performance K-code 289-cubic-inch V-8 that was not available on early 1965 Mustangs.

This car is just the first of many that Tom will highlight on his special trip through Detroit, so make sure to subscribe to Hagerty’s YouTube channel so you don’t miss any of the hidden gems of Motor City history.

Bullitt Reboot to be Directed by Steven Spielberg, Starring Bradley Cooper – Alexandra Purcell @FordAuthority

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Back in 1968, Steve McQueen led antagonists on a wild chase through the streets of San Francisco behind the wheel of an iconic green Ford Mustang for his role as detective Lieutenant Frank Bullitt in Bullitt. A modern reboot of the classic movie is on the horizon, set to be directed by Steven Spielberg and star Bradley Cooper in the titular role.

Details on the upcoming film are slim thus far, but it will be developed by Warner Brothers. The entertainment studio has stated that the new rendition of Bullitt will be “completely different” from the original. Cooper will produce the film alongside Spielberg, with Chad McQueen and Molly McQueen, Steve McQueen’s son and granddaughter, serving as executive producers. It’s not clear at this time when the movie could be released.

The Blue Oval has made several efforts to keep the “Bullitt” name synonymous with the Mustang over the last 54 years since the movie’s initial release. In the late 1960s, Ford released a more aggressive version of the first-generation Mustang to commemorate the film. The pony car’s 2008 model year lineup included another Bullitt-inspired Mustang that borrowed elements from the GT500 models, and a sixth-generation version returned for a brief production run in 2019. As previously reported by Ford Authority, the final Ford Mustang Bullitt rolled off the assembly line at the Flat Rock Assembly plant in late 2020.

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BREAKDOWN OF MUSTANG TRANSMISSIONS FROM 1979 TO PRESENT – @ModernDriveline

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SROD (SINGLE-RAIL OVERDRIVE)

The Single-Rail Overdrive, otherwise known as the SROD, is considered a “wide-ratio” 4-speed gearbox and features a smooth aluminum case with fully synchronized forward gears.
The reverse was left unsynchronized. The input shaft is a 10-spline while the output shaft is a 28-spline. On the VIN Door Tag, the Transmission Code is the number 6.
Because the SROD is unable to handle the increased horsepower, they are rarely seen being used in anything other than in a restored Ford Mustang.


Gear ratios for the SROD Mustang Manual Transmission are:

SROD GEAR RATIOS
Year……………………..1st2nd3rd4thReverse
1979 To Early 19833.071.721.00.703.07

The SROD can be found behind:

  • 1979 Ford Mustang GT 5.0L V8
  • 1982 to early 1983 Ford Mustang GT 5.0L V8

BORG WARNER/TREMEC T5

The venerable T5 Transmission is the longest-running transmission style used in the late model Mustang.
The heavily ribbed cast aluminum case serves as the home for fully synchronized 5 forward gears and reverse and features a 10-spline input shaft with a 28-spline output shaft.
There were many variations over the years, so stick with me here. 1983 1/2 to 1984 Mustang T5 manual transmission is called a Non-World Class, or NWC.
They are the least desirable of the V8 T5 manual transmissions as the gear metallurgy, synchronizer design, and bearing arrangement were based on old technology.

In the 1985 Mustang model year, the T5 was “upgraded” to a World-Class, or WC unit.
This added a much better synchronizer design, wide-ratio gearset, needle bearings for 1st, 2nd, and 3rd speed gears, and improved metallurgy throughout.
In 1989, the metallurgy was once again improved on the 2nd Speed Gear, 3rd Speed Gear, and Countershaft Cluster Gear.
The tooth pitch of 2nd and 3rd was revised for strength and the gear ratios were slightly altered. 1992 brought about a welcome upgrade in synchronizer facing material from organic to carbon fiber.
The reverse synchronizer assembly was also revised for better engagement.

In 1993, for the Cobra and Cobra R Mustang, the countershaft cluster gear received a special coating and the input bearing was upgraded from a Torrington style to a tapered roller bearing.
1994-1995 Mustang T5’s shared the same features as the Fox last variants, but the input shaft and input bearing retainer were a longer length.
1994-95 T5 will not fit Fox Mustang and 1983-93 T5 will not fit 1994-95 Mustangs without extensive modification.
1983-1989 Mustang T5 was equipped with a yellow 7-tooth speedometer drive gear and 1990-1995 Mustang T5 was equipped with a light green 8-tooth drive gear.
Gear ratios over the years for the Ford Mustang T5 are:

BORG WARNER/TREMEC T5 GEAR RATIOS
Year……………………..1st2nd3rd4th5thReverse
1983 1/22.951.941.341.00.732.76
19842.951.941.341.00.683.15
1985-19883.351.931.291.00.683.15
1989-19953.351.991.331.00.683.15

The T5 can be found behind:

  • 1983 to 1993 Ford Mustang LX and Mustang GT 5.0L V8
  • 1993 Ford Mustang Cobra and Cobra R 5.0L V8
  • 1994 to 1995 Ford Mustang GT and Cobra 5.0L V8

FORD RACING/TREMEC SUPER DUTY T5

This Mustang transmission justified its own mention due to its significance in the aftermarket as both a restoration and a performance part.
Basically, the T5 “Z” spec takes all the good updates and rolls them into one transmission.
The aluminum case is the latest revision and is the strongest offered on a production T5. Second, Third, and countershaft gears are all double moly.
All of the synchronizers are the latest revisions, with the 3rd and 4th featuring a carbon fiber facing. It has the 93 Cobra-style input pocket bearing and is already equipped with a steel input bearing retainer.
It has the standard-issue 10-spline 1-1/16 input shaft and 28-spline output shaft.
The speedometer drive gear is the desirable 7-tooth.
Gear ratios for the LRS-7003A Heavy Duty T5 Manual Transmission are:

FORD RACING/TREMEC SUPER DUTY T5 GEAR RATIOS
Year1st2nd 3rd4th5thReverse
1983-19932.951.941.341.00.632.76

The Ford Racing M-7003-Z T5 is a direct bolt-in for:

  • 1983 to 1993 Ford Mustang 5.0L V8

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The night of 1,000 Mustangs takes over Detroit for unveiling of seventh-generation pony car – William Hall @Hemmings

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Wednesday night’s reveal of the 2024 seventh-generation Ford Mustang kicked off the Detroit Auto Show in dramatic fashion. Not only did it introduce a new, sleek evolution of the iconic pony car in a festival setting at Hart Plaza, but it reset the standard for future vehicle introductions, particularly at the North American International Auto Show.

The lead up to the reveal was more than two weeks long, with the popular The Drive Home to The Mustang Stampede bringing at least one example of each of the six generations of Mustangs “home” to Detroit, along with a camouflaged seventh-generation prototype driven by the S650 Product Development Launch Leader Marty Mosakowski. Crossing more than 3,400 miles from its start in Tacoma, the tour invited Mustang enthusiasts from all across America to drive with the group for an hour, a day, or a week. Some diehard Mustang fanatics logged 1,000 miles or more to be a part of this historic event.

Mustangs from all eras filled the parking lot at Ford’s World Headquarters in Dearborn, Michigan, for a sprawling Mustang lovefest prior to a police-led procession downtown for the reveal. Per Ford’s suggestion, many owners showed up in period costume, with the Sixties and Seventies styles most popular.

Joining the fun was the Allen family from Kansas City, Missouri. Sean Allen had owned a 1996 Mustang in college, and had been following the coverage of The Drive Home here on Hemmings. At 11 a.m. the previous day, he and his wife Caroline decided to have an adventure, and loaded up their seven kids – Israel, Carrianna, Olivia, Emily, Deborah, Sophia, and young Jackson – into their “Bustang GT” Ford Transit van, determined to catch up to our group. They arrived at 1 a.m. in Auburn, Indiana, only to find one hotel room available, prompting Sean to sleep in the van overnight. Arriving more than 750 miles later in Dearborn with their Transit playfully painted-up, the photogenic family quickly became one of the media darlings of the event.

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Seventh-generation Mustang prototype leads The Drive Home road trip to its official debut – William Hall @Hemmings

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No road trip really becomes official until you have a few hours of driving under your belt. So while Tuesday night’s cruise-in kickoff at the LeMay-America’s Car Museum in Tacoma, Washington, was the official start of America’s Automotive Trust and the North American International Auto Show’s The Drive Home to The Mustang Stampede, it wasn’t until our 8 a.m. fire-drill start from Yakima that our trip began in earnest.

A contingent of Yakima-area Mustang owners had driven over the pass to the Tacoma launch party to escort us back to their home town. One of them was Captain Jeff Pfaff of the Yakima Fire Department in his white 2012 Boss 302. Captain Jeff left word with his colleagues at the Yakima Police Department, who put our hotel parking lot on their overnight patrol, allowing for a measure of comfort in our short sleep. Jeff is also a co-founder of Cars, Chrome and Coffee in Yakima, an inclusive event with emphasis on turning out young car enthusiasts. As we are finding out, passionate and helpful Mustang guys are all across this country.

Yakima Fire Captain and Mustang enthusiast Jeff Pfaff stops by for a morning chat.Photo by the author.

Joining us on the trip is one representative of each of the six generations of Ford Mustangs, along with the yet-unreleased Gen 7 car, wearing a thick armor of skunk works camouflage vinyl and prosthetics. Designed with a fair amount of science involved, the wrap was tested at Ford’s wind tunnel at 150 mph. The mimicked porthole opera windows, a nod to the iconic 1955 Thunderbird, were just the S650 production team having some fun.

The interior of the car is cloaked as well, and none of us are allowed inside. We get it. Keeping secrets has been a problem on the Gen 7 rollout, Ford’s biggest and most anticipated in years. First, pictures of the gauge cluster and interior were caught by Dearborn paparazzi, and images of the front end hit the internet. Then, the reveal at the Detroit Auto Show as leaked. “We’ve fired five people over this,” said S650 Launch Leader Marty Mosakowski. “Three (breaches) were accidental. Some engineers had to pull over in a Kroger parking lot to gather analytics, and raised up the cloak on the dash, and pics were snapped by industry spies. Two other in-house guys purposely took photos of the front end, and were caught on camera at our facility. Two hundred and fifty engineers attended a mandatory ‘stand down’ meeting, where camouflage policy was discussed and disciplinary actions reinforced. Secrecy has been a top priority on this project.

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R

More Ammeter Stuff – From One Man and His Mustang

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Interesting share from the excellent One Man & His Mustang blog

The blog post has a really good detailed approach on how to replace the ammeter with a voltmeter all whilst keeping the stock appearance.

Background:

Since I have owned the car and knew I would have to re-wire it I knew that the stock ammeter was not going to be a working option. My American Autowire Upgrade loom strongly recommended not to use it as well. The main reason they don’t recommend it is that the single wire alternator I now have is 100amps and not the tiny 48amp as stock. The amount of amps going to the ammeter would probably melt something and destroy my car via a fire. This leaves the options very limited to say the least, I could blank of the hole which would look rubbish, put a clock in there, better but not ideal or find somebody who has done some work to make a bespoke gauge very expensive I expect. I have investigated if anybody has done this before which of course they have with various results. They can look out-of-place being new with old, or only seem to work with the stock loom, again not an option for my upgrade wire loom. Many hours and thoughts have gone into looking about in old car accessory shops, online and eBay, and I think I have found a good alternative to the stock ammeter. I purchased the gauge from eBay in the end and it was shipped over from the far east which only took a couple of weeks to get here. My thoughts were along the lines of, it’s not a lot of money to wreck the meter if I have too and its worth a go. I gauge I found a VDO gauge that was plain black and white and the style of letting matched the stock gauge look. There is a wire from the back that will light up the meter via single white LED to only show up the gauge range at night so it wont flood the rest of dash. The only down side I could see was this was a big gauge depth wise due to the casing and the fulcrum of the gauge was at the bottom not the top as the other gauges.

This modification was going to require me to drill the back of the dash case. I made the decision this would be worth it. If you don’t want to drill your dash case back then this not for you! Obviously not concours but you will not see the drill marks from behind the dash, yeah I will get the anoraks saying “ooh, that’s not a genuine part is it?” My car is not going to be stuck in a garage cleaned and put away again, my car will be driven and enjoyed, that gauge will help me identify if there is a problem.

Tip: Before I started this little project I did check the gauge to make sure it worked. I crocodile clipped The terminals and touched the terminals. Which sprang the dial into life.

You can read the full article here

Brooklands Summer Classic Gathering and Auto Jumble 2022

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The usual enjoyable visit to historic Brooklands, this time for the Summer Classic Gathering and Auto Jumble.

Weather conditions where ideal, warm with a breeze and plenty of American transport on show.

Car of the Day for me was the 1929 DeSoto Model K, really beautiful car.

One of the more unusual cars to be seen on the UK show scene is the 1910 Stanley Steamer Runabout which was in fine running form.

Station Wagons are becoming very popular, this Torino Squire has nice patina

Good selection of trucks

Not the biggest fan of Rat Rods but the attention to detail here on this 27 T is something to behold

A few snakes, real and otherwise

Mustangs were also pretty well represented as you would expect, here’s a couple of the nicest on show. One with power added!

Street or Hot Rods?

Here’s the rest. good day all around!

A rare pair of pre-production Ford Mustang convertibles come up for sale – Barry Kluczyk @Hemmings

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By their very nature, pre-production vehicles are born to die. They’re automotive ephemera — cars created to help validate assembly procedures and serve as test beds, before being sacrificed to the crusher.

Theirs are lives typically measured in months, and when it came to Ford’s genre-establishing Mustang, in the spring of 1964, approximately 180 pre-production pony cars were constructed. Not all were scrapped, however. At least fifteen are known to have slipped past the crusher, surviving to illustrate a number unique and distinctive differences compared with the regular production models that started rolling off the Dearborn assembly line in March 1964.

All of the pre-production models carried an arbitrary “05C” production date, for March 5, 1964. They weren’t all constructed that day, as each involved a slower process that included a number of hand-assembly methods. In fact, the known pre-production models that have been tracked and studied show many signs of hand-formed or hand-trimmed components. The cars have also demonstrated a number of variances in the chassis/suspension components, as well as the trim, which were changed by the start of regular production.

At a glance, the pre-production Mustangs wore gunmetal grey-painted grilles rather than the darker gunmetal blue grilles of the production models. Also: The running horse emblem in the grille had an eye on the pre-production models, but it disappeared for the cars made for paying customers. A handful of the early cars were even fitted with silver-painted engines that reportedly made it easier to spot leaks on test vehicles, compared to the production black-painted engines.

With only 15 pre-production Mustangs known across the globe, they’re exceedingly rare, but an Arizona collector not only has two of them, they carry consecutive VINs: 5F08F100139 and 5F08100140. They’re convertibles, and while one has a black top and the other a white one, they’re otherwise identically equipped, with F-code 260 V-8 engines, C-4 three-speed automatic transmissions, 1-code 3.00-geared rear axles and black vinyl interiors.

That collector has decided to part with these historic cars and they’re offered right now on Hemmings Auctions, where the pair is being sold as a lot. He notes a concours-level restoration was completed on car 0139 in 2019, and it earned multiple awards after that, while car 0140 was reportedly restored in 2009. It, too, has won a number of awards, including two Mustang Club of America Gold awards, and it has appeared in three magazines. A Web site outlining the restoration of 0139 can be found at pony139resto.com.

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