Posted in Ford Mustang

Why the 1971-’73 Mustang Is My Preferred Pony – Matt Litwin @Hemmings

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By Matt Litwin from December 2021 issue of Muscle Machines



In This ArticleCategory: Hemmings Classic CarDuring the 2018 AACA Fall Meet, I had the unexpected pleasure of spending some time with retired Ford stylist Gale Halderman, who has since sadly passed away. If you’re not familiar with the name, Gale began his employment at Ford Motor Company in 1954, but within a decade the otherwise unassuming employee was thrust into a path of what would prove to be automotive greatness, at least in the eyes of today’s classic car enthusiasts. It started when Gale submitted his early sports car concept sketch — one of what turned out to be a field of 24 such renderings — to project planners for review. Gale’s drawing struck a chord, and he was subsequently selected by Lee Iacocca, special projects manager Hal Sperlich, and Ford studio chief Joe Oros to oversee the design of a new car that was eventually named Mustang.

Gale’s time with the Mustang didn’t stop with the smashing success of its first year on the market. He was destined to serve as the car’s design chief for another eight years, and his advances led to the development of the 1965 2+2 fastback and 1967 SportsRoof. In 1968, Gale was promoted to director of the Lincoln-Mercury design studio, a stint in the luxury divisions that lasted less than a decade. Why? Who better to oversee the development of the Fox-platform Mustang — introduced in 1979 — than the designer responsible for “the original” pony car?

Despite creating a legacy of automotive design that should register with old car enthusiasts as easily as Darrin, Earl, and a host of others, Gale, it seemed to me, hovered below the radar and remained a humble Ford employee who was simply proud of being in the right place at the right time, throughout his career. You could hear it in his voice that fall afternoon, as he thoughtfully reflected on his time at Ford

Read on.

Posted in Ford Mustang

Will it run? Starting up a 1969 Ford Mustang Mach 1 for the first time in 30 years @Hagerty

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Last week you saw us pull this 1969 Ford Mustang Mach 1 out of a pole barn it had been sitting in for nearly 30 years. Unfortunately, she didn’t start up on the first attempt, but that didn’t deter Davin as he set to work gathering a few parts to get her back up and running. So, join us as we get a little greasy and hopefully hear this classic roar again. Be sure to check out part 1 here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FB4zE…

Posted in drag racing, Ford Mustang, Hemmings

Even an expert Mustang restorer had the challenge of his career with Bill Goldberg’s “Lawman” Mustang – David Conwill @Hemmings

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Dreams seem to have their own mass, derived from the devotion of the dreamer. Cherish one long enough and hard enough and its gravity will draw you in. Sometimes it’s a lot of work and a long time before that trajectory becomes apparent.

Take the Lawman Mustang on these pages. You saw it last month and learned its story. How Ford used it as a morale booster for troops serving in Southeast Asia, improved road safety among returning vets, and sold a few new cars in the bargain. The way it wound up restored is a testament to how dreams can work out in unlikely ways.

Marcus Anghel, owner of Anghel Restorations in Scottsdale, Arizona, has long been a fan of the Lawman.“I followed this car for years.

I never thought I’d have the opportunity to restore it.”

As delivered to Anghel Restoration, the Lawman showed only 829 miles on the odometer, but they’d been hard miles. Not only was the engine blown and out of the car, but the wiring harness was a mess, and the car was just generally worn out.

Nor is Marcus the natural choice for such a restoration. He’s a Mustang guru, yes: A Mustang Club of America National Gold Card Judge and National Head Judge for the Shelby American Automobile Club. He’s renowned for his knowledge of 1969-’71 Boss Mustangs. Thanks to that, he has his choice of projects to take on. Typically, he restores these Mustangs back to stock—which is how his clients generally like them. People, as Marcus says, who “want them Day One, the way they were in the showroom.

”Admittedly, 21st-century circumstances being what they are, he’s had to embrace certain departures from showroom-stock for cars meant to be driven extensively. These are always hidden things, though, like a five-speed where a four-speed once resided, or a vintage radio rehabilitated with a Bluetooth receiver concealed inside.

A heavily worn drag car was a pony of a different color, as it were.

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Posted in 1968, Ford Mustang, Hemmings, Matt Litwin, Shelby Mustang GT500 Prototype

From street racing to 11-second timeslips: Dad’s Shelby G.T. 500 kept racing after he sold it – Matt Litwin @Hemmings

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Bride-to-be mom alongside dad’s 1968 Shelby G.T. 500 shortly after its purchase. Photo courtesy of Ray Litwin.

Twenty-four months. That’s essentially the duration my father shopped for, negotiated the purchase of, and owned his brand-new 1968 Shelby G.T. 500. On paper, the last 12 months of that timeframe doesn’t seem like one could accumulate enough enjoyment out of a dream car he financed for close to $5,000, yet he did. As discussed previously, once in his possession, the Shelby was enhanced with an aftermarket carburetor, was used as a daily commuter, burned through untold tanks of Sunoco 260 with alarming regularity, and, as I recently learned, was street raced to a perfect 3-0 record.

Dad drove his year-old Shelby G.T. 500 to Simon Ford, where it was traded in for a special-ordered 1969 Ford LTD loaded with every option, save for a 429-cu.in. engine. The G.T. 500 then appeared in this ad listing it for sale. In today’s money, that $4,195 asking price equates to $30,780.

It also was a hot ride—we’re talking engine heat—on top of already looking more and more like an impractical car for a young couple who were about to marry and buy their first house. It was enough to prompt Dad to trade the car in for something completely different: a 1969 Ford LTD Brougham. It was a car he and my mom owned for four years, which then started an endless buy/sell phase of car ownership that has been a part of the family legacy. Despite the variety of steeds, though, the one consistent question has always been, “Whatever happened to the Shelby?”

Almost immediately after the Shelby appeared in a local newspaper ad, Lilyan McGary—a resident of nearby Fitchville, Connecticut—arrived at Simon Ford to purchase the high-performance car for her son; according to lore, it was to be his first car. Over the course of the next several months, my dad remembered seeing the new owner(s) scooting along the area roads in the Shelby on several occasions before it slipped into the realm of former-car obscurity. How often it was driven, or the nature of its use when in the hands of the McGary family, is anyone’s guess to this day. Records make it clear, however, that on April 5, 1973, the G.T. 500 was purchased by nearby Canterbury resident Cliff Williams.

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Posted in Ford Mustang, Hemmings

Rebuilding the front suspension of a vintage Mustang – @Hemmings

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One area where vintage Mustangs often require attention is the front suspension. Because Mustang inherited the Falcon/ Comet platform, it also received the Falcon’s rather pedestrian front suspension design. The Falcon’s unit-body platform aided its affordability, and the car’s suspension was designed for a practical commuter automobile—not performance driving

So, while the Falcon underpinnings allowed the Mustang to come to market at a relatively low price, all these years later, it’s not uncommon for those suspension components to need replacement.

We recently followed along with the work performed during a complete front suspension rebuild on a ’65 Mustang undergoing a major facelift at Mustangs, Etc. in Van Nuys, California. Because Southern California enjoys nice weather throughout the year, enthusiasts are able to drive and enjoy their classic Mustangs regularly, so worn suspension parts need to be addressed to ensure a safe driving experience. This is a budget-conscious suspension upgrade that most enthusiasts can afford.

We cannot stress the issue of safety enough. When starting on this type of project, always support your vehicle with heavy-duty 2-ton-capacity jack stands under both frame rails, confirming their stability before getting underneath the car. Coil springs pack a tremendous amount of energy while compressed, so make sure to use a high-quality coil-spring compressor designed for coilover upper-arm applications like Mustang, Falcon, Fairlane, Comet, Torino, and even 1962-’67 Chevy II. The coil springs we are installing pack 600 pounds of pressure just to compress the spring 1 inch. Never stand in the path of a compressed coil spring. Always lay them flat while compressed, and stand away from them during removal and installation

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Posted in 1980's, 1990's, Ford Mustang, Fox Body, Hemmings

Buyer’s Guide: The plentiful, affordable, 5.0-powered 1987-93 Ford Mustang – Mike McNessor @Hemmings

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A new Mustang GT hit the ground galloping in 1982 and Ford shouted its return with the slogan: “The Boss is Back!” Hitching the Boss legend to this new pony made good marketing sense, but the Fox was no retro-themed throwback. It would go on to inspire a new generation of enthusiasts and launch dedicated magazines and websites, as well as become a darling of the aftermarket.

Old-school, American rear-drive performance mounted a comeback in the 1980s, ushered in by cars like the Buick Grand National, the Chevrolet Monte Carlos SS, and the Camaro IROC-Z. But, when new, these vehicles were priced out of reach of many young people on entry-level salaries. Also, the GM contingent offered manual transmissions only as exceptions rather than the rule.

Not so the 5.0. Ford priced the Mustang GT affordably and, beginning in 1983, offered a real-deal Borg-Warner T-5 fives-peed manual transmission. For ’86, Ford dumped the Holley carburetor and made multiport fuel injection plus a roller camshaft standard—exotic parts for a low-dollar production car back then.

While Chevrolet charged a premium for all the good stuff, Ford lowered the price by offering the el-cheapo LX with a 5.0 powertrain. Not only was it less expensive, but the notch-window body style, exclusive to the LX line, was lighter than the hatchback/convertible GT.

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Posted in Barrett Jackson, Carroll Shelby, Ford, Ford Mustang, Ford Mustang, Shelby Mustang GT500 Prototype

Legend of the Green Hornet – BARRETT-JACKSON

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The restoration of a lifetime! The incredible story of how Barrett-Jackson CEO and Chairman Craig Jackson and an elite team of automotive restoration specialists set out to restore the rarest and most desirable Shelby Mustang of all time, the 1968 EXP 500 Green Hornet.

The Green Hornet’s provenance of being a double prototype puts it into a unique category and represents a rolling history of what was happening within Ford and Shelby American in the heyday of the American muscle car era. The performance DNA of all modern Mustangs and Shelbys leads back to this very car, making this 1968 Ford Mustang Notchback Coupe – as Carroll Shelby once said – “the one and only Green Hornet.”

More here at Barrett Jackson

Posted in Auction, Barrett Jackson, Carroll Shelby, Ford, Ford Mustang, Ford Mustang

The Hunt for Little Red – BARRETT-JACKSON

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It was assumed lost for over 50 years, another prototype destined for the crusher. Except this one wasn’t. Witness the incredible story of Barrett-Jackson CEO and Chairman Craig Jackson’s personal quest to find and restore the mythical father of the Mustang California Special, the 1967 Shelby GT500 Prototype (EXP 500) known as “Little Red.” Discovered sitting in a Texas field, Little Red was Carroll Shelby’s way of getting the better of Ferrari’s road cars and the first of many incredible innovations. Get ready for the journey – exploring the restoration for one of the rarest cars on Earth!

More here on Barrett Jackson