Tag: Four Banger

Lucky 17. We hit sub zero in Bob’s stunning Ford Model A Speedster! – @HotRodRevue

Lucky 17. We hit sub zero in Bob’s stunning Ford Model A Speedster! – @HotRodRevue

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Bob runs us through the story of Lucky 17, his stunning Model A Speedster and puts it to use on a sub zero New Zealand winter morning! Film commissioned as part of Panhead Custom Ales’ custom can series. Check out the full range at http://www.panheadcustomales.com Subscribe to Hot Rod Revue for more tales of New Zealand’s rod and custom culture. And follow along on instagram and facebook for your daily dose!

Hotrod 4-banger with Cyclone head, Stromberg 97 and a Scintilla Vertex magneto – Slowshop & Custom @YouTube

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Yay! I´m working on the Tudor in this episode. Installing the Cyclone 7,5-1 high compression cylinder head, building the header, installing the Burns intake manifold, finding out my “restored” Stromberg 97 is crap but install it anyway… A lot of things happening so I had to split this one into two videos. Part deuce is coming next weekend. Thank you for watching!

RE-ENGINEERING THE MODEL A ENGINE – Terry Burtz, Campbell, CA

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Please take a look at Terry Burtz’s Model A engine project, potentially very exciting!

Automotive engine design and analyses has changed dramatically and is vastly improved since the Ford Model A engine was designed and analyzed in 1927. Have you ever wondered why even the best rebuilt or highly modified Model A engine has a useful life that is just a small fraction of the useful life of a modern engine? This article will attempt to answer that question and present an engineering design study that demonstrates what can be accomplished by substituting four redesigned parts into a Model A engine. By substituting these four redesigned parts, a stock appearing Model A engine can have the reliability and longer life of a modern engine, and a hot-rodded engine will have a much higher probability of staying together. Readers of this article will also learn about modern engineering methodology, understand the reasoning behind engineering design decisions, and learn how a collection of sand cores can come together to form the cavities of a complex casting. For additional information, readers are encouraged to do Internet searches on the words, phrases, and terminology used in this article.  This article presents a summary of what has been accomplished. And lastly, this article has been written to determine if there is enough interest for this engineering study to continue and become real hardware. I apologize for the length of this article, but there is a vast amount of information to present.

September 2020 update here

(Copyright 2007 T. M. Burtz)

Removing Valves from a Ford Model B Engine

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Removing Valves from a Ford Model B Engine

As part of the inspection of the Model B engine it was found that the valves were seized due to the amount of time that the engine has been laid up.

With a bit of a two man effort and the correct Ford valve spring compressor and valve guide “knocker” tool the valves and guides were extracted. The guides and followers are in really good shape. Will most likely replace at least the exhaust valves.

Valve guide tool

Valve spring compressor

Removing Valves from a Ford Model B Engine

Related – Model B Engine Inspection

Related – B is for Banger

Hagerty Redline: Freshly rebuilt engine goes back into the Ford Model A

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Freshly rebuilt engine goes back into the Ford Model A

In the leadup to the next Redline Rebuild video, the Hagerty video crew has released three videos documenting Davin Reckow’s rebuild of a Ford Model A four-cylinder. While Davin knows his way around a domestic V-8, each engine family tends to have its own quirks. These “banger” engines are a whole different animal entirely, since they predate most common pushrod V-8s by an entire generation.

Read the article here

Freshly rebuilt engine goes back into the Ford Model A

Related 1928-’31 Ford Model A

Hagerty Redline Rebuild Model A Ford

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Hagerty Redline Rebuild Model A Ford

The excellent Hagerty Redline engine rebuild series has arrived at the venerable Model A. As you’ll be able to see Davin highlights the differences between the Model A and modern engines.

The Model A section begins at 5:05 in the video

In the next video Davin takes a trip to get the Babbit bearings poured, interesting end to process.

Now the engine has been freshened up Davin starts to fully understand the difference between the older and modern engines

Assembly continues on our Model A Ford engine. Almost ready to run!

Hagerty Redline Rebuild Model A FordRelated  Watch this tired big-block 396 go from crusty to trusty

Model B Engine Inspection

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Took a trip over to strip and inspect the Model B engine, on the whole it was very encouraging. Looking at the stamping on the block it looks as if it’s a 1939 build.

The engine looks in great shape and we think it was overhauled maybe back in the 1950’s and then just stored before changing hands a number of times. The white metal big ends and mains are in reall good shape as are the timing gears. The issue at hand is a number of stuck valves which means we can’t turn the engine fully at this point. So, more soaking in penetrating oil and get back to it in a week or so.

B is for Banger – David Conwill @Hemmings

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THE 1932-’34 FORD MODEL B ENGINE MAY LOOK LIKE ITS PREDECESSOR, BUT IT’S A MAJOR IMPROVEMENT

For 1932, Ford introduced an improved version of the Model A four-cylinder to accompany the new V-8 in its cars and trucks. This 200.5-cu.in., 50-hp engine was known, appropriately enough, as the Model B.

The Model B shared many elements with its Model A predecessor, and the two had a great deal of physical interchangeability–attested by the fact that today, many updated Model A’s incorporate some or all of a Model B engine for improved driveability. A prominent change between the Model A and Model B engines was the addition of significantly more bearing area: Larger diameter bearings for both the connecting rods and mains meant better durability and more potential for power.

Read the rest here

Gow To: Evaluating a Model B four-banger – David Conwill @Hemmings

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The Revelator needs a new engine. This is how it’s being done economically. Photo by Dan Beaudry, others by David Conwill and as credited

how-to (hou-tü) adj. giving practical instruction and advice (as on a craft)

gow (gou) n. automobile modified for speed and performance in the pre-WWII style

gow-to (gou-tü) adj. giving practical instruction and advice for modifying automobiles for speed and performance in the pre-WWII style

Read the rest of the article here

 

The Mysterious RayDay Cylinder Head – David Conwill @Hemmings

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Just like the ’30s, bro

This Winfield intake, Cyclone adapter (to install a Stromberg), and RayDay cylinder head were removed from a Model A in 1956. Images courtesy Evan Bailly and as noted.

We are suckers for vintage speed equipment. The hobby of making inexpensive cars faster goes way back—it predates the term “hot rod” by decades. While some names have been around for ages and are so well-established that they’ve become background noise, there are far more companies that tried to enter the business of hop-up parts and didn’t make it. Some folded their tents entirely, but others had come from the more-general auto-supply business and returned to that.

Read David’s excellent article here