Fitting the Mike’s Affordable Oil Filter Oil Kit to the 1929 Model A Ford Sport Coupe

With Simon’s help I spent the day fitting the Mike’s Affordable Oil Filter Kit on the Model A.

When we removed the tappet cover we found a random pipe attached to the oil gallery routing oil it appears down to the timing gears.

The pipe was situated exactly where we needed to fit the oil filter feed pipe, after some interaction with Mr Cochran we decided to bite the bullet and remove it.

The feed pipe for the kit was put in its place, hopefully this was the right move, also posted on the Ford Barn for some feedback which was quite varied.

Time will tell I guess?

We also took the opportunity to sort out the exhaust manifold blow and the loose down pipe.

Things like not using the copper gaskets and gland rings were at the root of the manifold issue.

For the loose down pipe we fitted a new clamp and a sleeve to improve the joint between manifold and pipe.

Whilst things were in progress we also spruced the engine and inlet manifold with some paint.

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Crossing the Channel – Replacing 1929 Model A Ford Window Channels

I’ve been meaning to sort out the perished windows channels on the Model A, so I headed over to John Cochran’s for some expert assistance.

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Once we had removed the door trims it was very interesting to find the details from the trim manufacturer from 20 years ago! I may research the detail to see if I can get a bead on who owned the car back then. I’ve tried writing to the owner listed on the title but sadly got no reply.

It was great to drive home with slightly less rattles thanks to John!

What’s the point(s)!

After a few days preparation, a good road test and Simon’s assistance with clutch adjustment we were ready for our annual trip to Wheels Day in Aldershot, well we thought we were…

Things started to feel a little strange on the M4, but we put that down to a GAV adjustment as after a tweak things improved. However the car cut out and restarted after we came off the motorway, we managed to get around another couple of miles and then broke down with a bang and no restart this time. We had fuel but no spark, the Pertronix electronic ignition module had failed, this is the second such failure in the three years that I’ve had the car.

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A very wise man named John Cochran did suggest that I stick to points a couple of years ago, I took the “if it ain’t broke” approach, well now it’s broke and I’ll be reverting to points!

Luckily my friend John Barron was travelling with me to the show, and his personal AA cover ensured we got home safely and very efficiently (thanks again John!)

Hats off to the the two AA staff that helped us today, customer service at its finest. Suffice to say I joined when I got home!

Sears Allstate Tyres

Looking at John’s Leatherback the other night I noticed that it had a really old set of Sears Allstate tyres fitted.

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Did a bit of research on the Allstate brand and found an article on the Sears archive here and below

Today, when people think of Allstate, they think of automobile insurance. Over the years, however, Sears used the Allstate brand name on a wide variety of products for the automobile, from spark plugs to rebuilt automobile engines.

The Allstate brand began in 1925 as part of a national contest to name Sears’ new brand of automobile tires. Public response in the contest was overwhelming. Before it was over, 937,886 people submitted a total of 2,253,746 names. Entries came from every state and in 25 different languages. Hans Simonson of Bismarck, N.D., received a $5,000 cash prize for his winning entry Allstate.

In 1926, Sears adopted the trademark Allstate for initial use on automobile tires and tubes. The tires-guaranteed for 12,000 miles-quickly became big sellers in the catalog and at the new Sears, Roebuck and Co. retail stores (which first opened in 1925). Sears Chairman General Robert E. Wood credited the Allstate tire with making an important contribution to the success of Sears’ retail store program.

Sears formed the Allstate Insurance Company on April 17, 1931. Allstate offered low rates, available to customers through direct-mail sales (Sears catalogs) and through sales booths in Sears stores. Allstate eventually expanded into fire insurance.

The highpoint for the Allstate brand came in the 1950s and 1960s, when the brand appeared on a wide range of products, including garage door openers, fire extinguishers, motor scooters and camper shells. During these years, before seatbelts, heaters, radios, and air conditioners became standard equipment on automobiles, Sears offered a complete line of these accessories under the Allstate brand.

In 1952, Sears introduced the Allstate automobile. Built by the Kaiser-Frazer Corporation, the Allstate automobile came in two models: The Standard ($1,395) and the Delux ($1,796) models came with a choice of optional four- or six-cylinder engines and a transmission overdrive. All automobiles came with a 90-day guarantee. As popular as the insurance and accessories were, however, few people wanted to buy an entire car with the Allstate name. Disappointing sales caused the Allstate automobile to disappear from Sears stores after 1953.

By the end of the 1960s, Sears limited the Allstate brand name to insurance, tires, and automobile batteries. By the mid-1970s, Sears no longer used the Allstate brand on merchandise. In 1995, Allstate became completely independent after Sears divested its remaining shares to Sears’ stockholders, ending the company’s 70-year relationship with the brand it created.

Source

Sears Archive

 

An Update Visit to John’s!

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Popped over to see my good friend Mr Cochran this evening.

John has a really nice 1929 Model A Fordor Leatherback that he imported from the States which hadn’t run since the 70’s.

This car is possibly the most original Model A I’ve ever seen, the car had been sat in a barn for many years. As you can see and hear, John now has the car running beautifully!

 

Removing Steering Column Drop Bracket

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At the recent Berkshire Motor Show, Mr Cochran remarked at the fact that the Sport Coupe was fitted with a column drop bracket which is not standard, and was causing the column to be too low which resulted in very little knee clearance for someone of my height. Once removed the room between my knees and the wheel is improved quite a bit.

  • Pretty easy job to do:
  • Loosen floorboards
  • Loosen steering box mounting bolts
  • Remove steering column bolts
  • Remove column drop bracket
  • Refit column with new shorter bolts
  • Tighten steering column bolts
  • Refit floorboards

 

Berkshire Motor Show 2016

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Went along to the Berkshire Motor Show with the Sport Coupe for its second show outing of the year

The first proper run with the new rear suspension set up, very pleased rides very well 🙂

John Cochran with his A truck was parked next to me, pretty good show with no rain and a few other American cars present.

The best part of the show was that proceeds went to Charity!

 

 

 

More Updates to my 1929 Model A Sport Coupe

 

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Had a few days off work and with Simon’s help caught up with a number of tasks on the A :

New Rear Spring

Tube Rear Shock Absorbers

Repair Offside Rear Wheel Arch

Repair Seat Back Brackets

Fix Slight Steering/Front Shock Absorber Issue

In fact we did every I’d planned and in two days!

Special thanks to John Cochran as we couldn’t have done the job without the use of his spring spreader 🙂