Tag: Maintenance

1929 Model A Ford Sport Coupe Front Brake Maintenance

1929 Model A Ford Sport Coupe Front Brake Maintenance

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Since the juice brakes were updated not long after I got the car, one of the previous owners had changed the standard Model A mechanical brakes to hydraulic (juice) brakes. They had used the earlier brakes and I converted to the later 39-48 version which in my experience are easier to maintain. The reason for taking a look at the front brakes was that the passenger side front was grabbing a little when cold.

All the the shoes were cleaned up with abrasive paper, the shoe touch points and adjusters lubricated. The drivers side front brake drum is showing signs of wear from previous brake shoe wear issues. A new drum will be sourced as well as a set of shoes. After the inspection the drums were refitted, wheel bearings repacked and the brakes adjusted. Wheels were then refitted ensuring that the wheel protection rings were fitted between the wheels and brake drums. These rings stop the wire wheels from cracking. Wheel bearings were adjusted and split pins fitted, then brakes were adjusted.

Whilst working on the front brakes I took the opportunity to adjust the cables on the excellent Cling handbrake system. Details here

Reminder: The perils of neglecting your classic – Jim Richardson @Hemmings

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One night, I was driving home on the freeway when an old, neglected 1956 Mercury passed me at a good clip. As it flew by, its left front wheel came off, hubcap, hub, and all. It wobbled crazily out into the fast lane of the highway and bounced over the center divider. Fortunately, no cars were hit. Simultaneously, the Mercury dropped to the pavement, creating a shower of sparks, and then careened off onto the shoulder. I had heard of such things happening, but had never witnessed them before

.I doubled back to see if I could help, but there was nothing I could do. The driver was unhurt, but the car was most likely damaged beyond repair, unless the fellow had a lot of money and knew of a shop that could handle it. Parts for such cars are no longer available at Pep Boys.

Why did it happen? The answer is simple. With cars from the 1960s on back, the front wheel bearings need to be packed with fresh grease every 10,000 miles. If that isn’t done, the bearings will eventually run out of grease, get hot, wear out, and even seize on the spindle. And if you are doing 70 mph at that moment, you could lose a wheel, lose control, and destroy your car, and probably not do yourself any good either.

I know this as I did routine maintenance at “service” stations as a lad. They were called service stations, because they did a lot more than just pump gas. You see, cars from the early Sixties and prior needed regular attention. They required oil changes every 1,000 miles, along with a chassis lube. And they needed ignition tune-ups every 10,000 miles in order to run properly.

Also, cooling systems needed to be flushed and refreshed every year. And universal joints needed packing every 5,000 miles, too. But sadly, most people were blissfully unaware, and didn’t do all that routine maintenance, with the result that most of what we now call classic cars were neglected to death. The few that were scrupulously maintained, on schedule, lasted nearly forever.

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5 steps to bring your car out of storage for spring driving season – Kyle Smith @Hagerty

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No amount of lamp light will cure the car lover’s seasonal affective disorder, suffered when the weather is too cold or the roads too salty for driving a classic. Luckily, spring is upon us, which means many of us are champing at the bit to get our cars out of storage and onto our favorite roads. If you haven’t already, you’re likely planning to go out to the garage soon in order to peel the car cover off and greet an old friend for a fresh season of cruising. Tempting as it might be to just turn the key and go, it’s often wise to make sure everything is in order, so as to avoid any mechanical diversions from the next blissful day of weekend sunshine. These five steps should do the trick:

Clean and inspect

Even if your beloved ride has been living under a cover for the last few months, it could use a good cleaning before hitting the town. The best part about a good deep clean-up is that it gets you up close and in personal with your car. A basic walk-around tends to overlook a handful of areas, but going over the whole body with a microfiber or a clay bar will get you noticing a lot more than a passing glance would turn up. Keep a pad of paper handy while you do this and document your observations while you go over the car front to back, or snap some photos on your phone. This written status report or photo documentation can be a useful reference in future to better understand how components are wearing or aging.

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Five overlooked maintenance items you really shouldn’t ignore – Kurt Ernst @Hemmings

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Five overlooked maintenance items you really shouldn’t ignore

Riding a motorcycle teaches one many lessons, the first and foremost of which is never overlook maintenance. In my three-plus decades spent in the saddle, a pre-ride inspection was as routine as donning a helmet, gloves and riding gear, and (I’d like to think) it saved me from more than one far-from-home surprise. I’m equally diligent with four-wheeled vehicles now, particularly when planning a road trip of any distance. Here are the five things that many classic car owners often ignore – but really shouldn’t.

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Five overlooked maintenance items you really shouldn’t ignore

Related How to Remove Broken Bolts and Repair Stripped Threads – Hot Rod Network Staff