Tag: Model A Ford

Forties technology would make for a perfect 1928 Ford Model A shop truck. Here’s how I’d build it – David Conwill @Hemmings

Forties technology would make for a perfect 1928 Ford Model A shop truck. Here’s how I’d build it – David Conwill @Hemmings

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A Ford Model A roadster pickup like this 1928 Ford Model A roadster pickup (“Open Cab Pickup”) in the Hemmings Classifieds would make a great shop truck or long-distance hauler with just a few period upgrades.

This one caught my attention because it’s nearly identical to the one we have in the Sibley which was once dragged to TROG. I saw it there for the first time, and I’ve harbored ambitions about turning that little pickup into something with a bit of 1940s flavor ever since. Talking to Jeff Koch about his plans for his family’s 1931 coupe re-energized my appreciation for Ford’s 1928-’31 masterpiece and the myriad ways people have found to improve them since. Jeff wants to walk the line between hot rodding and touring using some newer equipment, but left to my own devices, I’d always hew closer to how Ford developed its cars from 1928 to 1948. It’s a good lesson for making any ’20s car a better driver without sacrificing the vintage experience.

Although the Hemmings pickup is the one I see most often, any ’28 or ’29 would fit the bill. It’s mere coincidence that this one is also a Commercial Green (Rock Moss Green? Something like that) 1928 model. The Hemmings truck is somewhat rarer as it is an early 1928 with the slightly nicer looking splash aprons and the hand brake near the door, Model T-style. Supposedly, Pennsylvania didn’t permit the early design, hexing a big potential market for Ford. I seem to recall the objection was that the hand brake was used to set the rear-wheel service brakes, but PA required separate systems for emergency/parking brakes and service brakes.

No matter, all those interesting old parts, new design or old, could be removed and preserved someplace after a proper pickling/mothballing. In their place would go the best of early 1940s technology, starting with 12 x 2-inch hydraulic drum brakes, front and rear. Up front, I’d go with new Lincoln-style units from Bass Kustom and in back, Ford-type brakes, as they’re somewhat easier to retrofit to an early axle. The Lincoln units have the advantage that Ford chose to license Bendix’s self-energizing technology for its up-market brand, whereas regular Ford and Mercury cars stuck with the Chrysler-Lockheed type through 1948.

The original axles and Houdaille shocks, if in good condition (and the listing says the little pickup has only “88 miles since completion” of a “complete frame-off restoration,” so they ought to be) can stay. If not, there’s always longtime Hemmings advertiser Apple Hydraulics. If my planned tires (which I address below) look a little lost under the fenders, a reverse-eye front spring is a good way to get the nose down slightly without resorting to dropping the front axle

Four-million Ford owners can’t be wrong. The 200.5-cu.in. Model A four-cylinder was a solid, dependable unit that saw millions through the Depression and World War II. The basic design stayed in production for years and fitting one with pieces developed in the Thirties and Forties improves them further still.

I’d ideally give this shop truck a touring-grade Model A engine with a balanced crank and pressurized oiling, but retain the poured bearings. Some of those upgrades may already be present on what is supposed to be a fresh, low-mileage engine, but if not, it would be a good canvas to add them. With a solid foundation to rely on, I’d add performance with a Model A police-service 5.5:1 compression cylinder head (marked with a cast-in B; actual Model B engines got heads marked with “C.” Very confusing) or a cast-iron Winfield head for as close as I could get to 6:1 compression (poured bearings get cranky when you go higher than that); single downdraft carburetor on an aftermarket intakeModel B camshaft and either a Ford Model B distributor or the upgrade unit produced by Mallory for many years in place of the manual-advance Model A unit; and the Duke Hallock-designed exhaust header I had wanted for my late, lamented Model T.

You could probably run this fairly mild engine against the original un-synchronized three-speed, but it would really up the ease of driving if you followed Ford’s route and adapted a V-8 gearbox with synchronizers on second and third gears. The 1932-‘34 Ford Model B used a trans behind its 50hp four-cylinder that was internally the same as the V-8 models but used a different case. Now, you can put any 1932-’48 Ford passenger-car transmission or 1932-’52 light-truck three-speed behind a Model A engine using an adaptor from Cling’s. The pinnacle of early Ford V-8 transmission technology is widely agreed to be the nice-shifting ’39-’52 Ford floor-shift three-speed (exclusive to trucks from 1940-on) containing ’46-’48 Ford passenger-car or close-ratio Lincoln-Zephyr gears in order to mate with the enclosed driveline.

Read on

Ford Model A ammeter – How to prevent a fire in your Model A – Paul Shinn

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The Ford Model A ammeter (amp meter) is at the center of the Model A electrical system. Today, Model A Ford mechanic Paul Shinn shows you how to modify the typical reproduction ammeter to make it safer, and as a bonus, how to make it look more like an original. If you don’t want your Model A to break down, just subscribe! http://www.youtube.com/user/paulshinn…

1927-1929 Model A Speedo Refurbishment – @Astra-Werke

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There are two general types of Speedometer for the Model A – the oval and the round bezel is the most obvious difference from the outside. On the inside, they are entirely different, too – so since this thing landed on my bench, I decided to do a teardown and repair video on this one, too. Enjoy!

Cars and Coffee @Richard Edmonds Auctions Chippenham

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Took a trip over to the well known auctioneers Richard Edmonds at Chippenham for a cars and coffee/breakfast event.

Nice turn out of cars and is usual those from the other side of the pond are featured here.

Stunning 1938 Packard One Twenty Convertible

Followed by another convertible, this time a 1916 Hudson

And for good measure a well used but clearly loved Model A Tudor

Something more modern a 2002 Ford F150 Lightning

Also some nice Petrolania

Looking forward to the next auction which is in October

Check here for information

Building the Model A Ford Body on the Assembly Line – A Model A @YouTube

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Based on the feedback we received with the Engine Assembly video we pieced together this video. Using 10 different archived videos spliced together this video depicts the assembly process that Ford built bodies went through (Briggs, Murray, and Budd shipped completed bodies to Ford). It starts with the rolling out of the sheet metal, stamping sub rails, rear quarter panels, the rear wall, assembly jig, polishing, pinstriping, and more. Be sure to look for the very early 1928 Tudor body! Multiple years, assembly plants, and countries are represented in this video so you’re not seeing a single body being produced but rather working with what is available to give a general overview of the process. A Model A is dedicated to the history of the Model A Ford using historical images and videos as well as modern resources.

When a Ring Job turns into much more.. – Astra-Werke @YouTube

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Great video from Astra-Werke not the outcome he was looking for unfortunately.

Whelp, time for a full rebuild, I reckon.

Tips, Suggestions a.s.o. greatly appreciated, especially regarding dimensions & tolerances for boring out to inserts.

0:00 – Intro

4:59 – Head Disassembly

7:32 – Top End Evaluation

10:32 – Disassembly Continued

13:11 – Piston & Rod Evaluation

16:55 – Main Bearing Removal

18:59 – Current Situation & Future

Model A Ford Engine Numbers; What do they tell us? – A Model A @YouTube

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People are always asking “What’s the number on my Model A engine mean?” Is it a serial number? Is there a record of what body style and color of car the engine was originally installed in? Can it tell me the date my Model A was built? This video tries to briefly explain the history of the Model A engine numbers and what information you can find out about your car from it.

More information on the links below:

Want to know the exact date a Model A engine was stamped? http://modelahouse.com/cgi-bin/enumbe… Want to know about milestone engines and design changes? http://www.plucks329s.org/studies/stu… Want to know more about engine production, especially foreign “A” engines? https://www.fordgarage.com/

How The Model A Ford Engine Was Built; The Engine Assembly Line – A Model A @YouTube

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Using 22 different archived videos spliced together this video depicts the Model A engine being produced, from sand molds to being dropped in a chassis. Every Model A engine destined for one of Ford’s 30+ US assembly plants was cast and assembled at the Rouge Plant in Dearborn, MI. Make sure to look out for the main bearing babbitts being poured, the flywheel being balanced, and the manifolds being assembled. How did we do? A Model A is dedicated to the history of the Model A Ford using historical images and videos as well as modern resources.

1929 Model A Ford Sport Coupe Dash Rewire and Happy 4th July!

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Happy 4th July!

Decided it was high time the dash wiring was replaced as it was pretty much the same age as the car!

As you can see it was a bit crispy and the ignition switch wire was badly chafed and liable to cause a short.

The dash loom came from O’Neils and the ignition switch wire is a home made item with some loom braiding for protection.

Probably the biggest pain of the whole job was having to disconnect the speedo cable as removing the dash made the whole job a lot easier.

Pro-tip don’t leave your magnetic torch on the exhaust when you road test the car (ask me how I know :))

Whilst the dash was out it was a good opportunity to lubricate the speedo and tighten the ignition switch which can work loose and also make the dash light wire a bit safer as it’s showing its age.