Tag: Model T

The Highwaymen (2019) – Costner & Harrelson, Bringing Down Bonnie & Clyde

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Enjoyable film especially for lovers of the 30’s and vintage Fords

Kevin Costner is an actor who makes almost everything he’s in better. A reliable force in Hollywood for decades now, he brings a gravitas to his roles that elevate most projects. In the case of The Highwaymen, a new film that just hit Netflix yesterday, his performance almost is enough to recommend it on its own. The whole final product is a bit too uneven, though Costner is really strong in the central role. While the flick is making some unusual choices, Costner is just doing his thing and putting the movie on his back. It doesn’t fully make up for the shortcomings, but the film knows that Costner is the selling point and leans into that. The movie is a true life drama based on the untold story of the two legendary detectives and former Texas Rangers who were able to bring down Bonnie and Clyde. At the onset,

See full article at Hollywoodnews.com »

Inside the thrash: A look into building a hot rod on a tight deadline, Part 3

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With Detroit Autorama getting shockingly close, Scott Sheehan — our hero  — has turned what looked like a car into a bare frame. That might seem like Sheehan is taking a backward step, which wouldn’t be ideal with the show’s move-in date approaching, but in order to get the Ford Model T’s hand-built frame finished and painted, everything had to go. At least, everything had to go away from the car’s frame.

Read more here

Inside the thrash: A look into building a hot rod on a tight deadline, part 2 – Wesley Wren @Autoweek

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Back to work after the Grand National Roadster show, and explaining the thrash

It might not seem like a ton of progress has been made on Scott Sheehan’s Model T roadster project in over the past week — you can blame The Grand National Roadster Show for that — but the little Model T is still moving along. The major projects Sheehan knocked out this week might not be as glamorous as putting together an engine or laying paint, but are examples of the mundane-but-necessary tasks it takes to build a car.

Read more here

Ford Model T Coast to Coast: A Slow Drive Across a Fast Country – Tom Cotter

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The latest book from the always excellent Tom Cotter of the “In The Barn” series of books and the star of the Hagerty YouTube series “Barn Find Hunter” chronicles his drive across the USA with Michael Alan Ross in a hopped up 1926 Model T Roadster via the Lincoln Highway.

This newly released hardcovers spans 225 pages and is loaded with entertaining stories from the road.

You can purchase a copy here from the Rodders Journal

Prescott Vintage Speed Hill Climb

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The Prescott Vintage Speed Hill Climb takes place at the home of the Bugatti Owners Club in the heart of the very picturesque rolling Cotswold Hills in South Central England. Prescott Hill has been an active motorsports venue for 80 years! The site was purchased in 1937 by the Bugatti owners club, but all events are run under the auspices of the The Vintage Sports-Car Club. The VHRA also run their annual Gow! Hill Climb event at this venue. The VSSC event predominately features British and European vehicles, but there were a few American vehicles both in competition and on the showfield.

1926 Ford Model T Rajo Special Hill Climb Competitor

Model T Speedster on the Showfield

 

Model T Based Flathead Powered Hot Rod on the Showfield

Various other American entrants on the Showfield (yes I’ve included RHD Model A’s!)

 

 

 

Joe Jagersberger (Rajo Joe) Hot Rod Pioneer

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Joe Jagersberger came to the USA from Austria and began working for Case Corporation in Racine Wisconsin to assist in developing a race car programme.

Whilst working for Case Jagersberger was a regular race competitor including racing at the Indianapolis 500. He continued to race until 1911 eventually becoming victim to a career ending crash after which he spent several months in hospital and resulted in an amputation of his right leg.

Despite his injuries he continued to work at Case as a consultant. He continued to design cylinder heads and other peripherals eventually starting his own company under the famous Rajo brand. The name of the brand was formed from the RA of Racine and the JO from his first name.

Rajo started off by producing spark plugs and various other items. They then moved into producing  performance cylinder heads for Ford Model T and Model A cars.

The first design was the Model 30 which had 4 exhaust ports and one intake port all on the right side of the head. The Model 31 had two intakes on the right and four exhaust on the left. The Model 35C, first known as the “Improved Rajo Valve-in-Head” and later as the Model C had two intakes and three exhausts on the right. The Model A used the stock intake ports on the block. It had two exhaust ports on the right. His Model B two intakes on the right and four exhausts on the left. It came in three versions. The BB featured a higher compression ratio and the BB-R also included two spark plugs per cylinder.

He also offered a modification to the 1941-52 Chevrolet “stovebolt” L6 OHV 15 bolt head, which added another set of 3 intake ports above the 3 originals, to permit adding (an) extra carburetor(s) on a separate manifold.

Jagersberger died in 1952. The company closed in 1980.

Rajo equipment is still very much sought after and command very high prices amongst the traditional hot rod community

Here on Hemmings are some great examples of  period Rajo powered racers

1925 Ford Faultless RaJo Racer

1922 Ford Model T Indy Board Track Racer

There are also some interesting Rajo ephemera items to be found on sites such as eBay

Sources Wikipedia, Hemmings, trackforum.com

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rajo_Motor_and_Manufacturing

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joe_Jagersberger