Tag: Streamliners

1934 Streamliner Looks Like Nothing Else, And It’s The Only One Left – Jacob Oliva @Motor1.com

1934 Streamliner Looks Like Nothing Else, And It’s The Only One Left – Jacob Oliva @Motor1.com

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Only six were built as promotional vehicles for the McQuay-Norris Company of Missouri.

The 1934 McQuay-Norris Streamliner is a pretty unique car, but that’s not only because of its rather peculiar design. With only six units built from 1933 to 1934, you’d be hard-pressed to find something like it on the road – much more so with the fact that this is the only one currently in existence.

Jeff Lane owns this Streamliner. The few units were built as promotional vehicles for the McQuay-Norris Company of St. Louis, Missouri. The company manufactured replacement pistons, rings, bearings, and other parts used to rebuild engines.

The body of this unique classic car was by the Hill Auto Body Metal Company of Cincinnati, Ohio. It was made from steel and aluminum over a wood framework, while the curved windshield was made from plexiglass. It sits atop a Ford chassis.

As the promotional vehicles were also used as test cars, there are several gauges on the dashboard that are used to monitor various engine components – primarily to show customers why McQuay-Norris Company’s products are better than others. But those aren’t the odd thing about the cabin – the driver sits far back from the front, almost near the middle of the vehicle. The two bucket seats have a compartment for luggage at the back.

Read on

Streamlines Make Headlines – 1938 – Ford Heritage @YouTube

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This film promotes the aerodynamic Lincoln Zephyr, first launched in 1936. The car was conceived by Edsel Ford and designed by Eugene Turenne Gregorie ,said to be inspired by the Pioneer Zephyr Streamliner train. At the beginning of the film we see other streamline designs in action, including the record-breaking SS Normandie.

Overview[From Wikipedia]

Introduced on November 2, 1935,[3] as a 1936 model, the Lincoln-Zephyr was extremely modern with a low raked windscreen, integrated fenders, and streamlined aerodynamic design, which influenced the name “zephyr”, derived from the Greek word zephyrus, or the god of the west wind. It was one of the first successful streamlined cars after the Chrysler Airflow‘s market resistance, and the concept car Pierce Silver Arrow, which never went into production. In fact, the Lincoln-Zephyr actually had a lower coefficient of drag than the Airflow, due in part to the prow-like front grille on the Zephyr, reflecting the popularity of leisure speedboats like Chris-Craft. The Lincoln-Zephyr succeeded in reigniting sales at Lincoln dealerships in the late 1930s, and from 1941 model year, all Lincolns were Zephyr-based[4] and the Lincoln-Zephyr marque was phased out. Annual production for any year model was not large, but accounted for a large portion of the Lincoln brand’s sales. In its first year, 15,000 were sold, accounting for 80% of Lincoln’s total sales.

Production of all American cars was halted by the Government in 1942 as the country entered World War II, with Lincoln producing the last Lincoln Zephyr on February 10.[5] After the war, most makers restarted production of their prewar lines, and Lincoln was no exception. The Zephyr name, however, was no longer used after 1942, with the cars simply called Lincolns.

The idea of a smaller and more modern luxury car to fill the gap in Lincoln’s traditional lineup was revisited in the 1950 Lincoln Lido (The Lido was the same size as other two-door Lincolns, though[6]), 1977 Lincoln Versailles, 1982 Continental, and 2000 Lincoln LS. The Zephyr name was resurrected in 2006 for the car’s spiritual successor, the Zephyr, which was quickly renamed the MKZ for 2007.

Clarke Gable in his Zephyr

GM’s Fleeting Fastback Phase: The 1941-52 Streamliners — Reblog Mac’s Motor City Garage

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When the GM streamliners first made their appearance in 1941, they looked like the most advanced cars on the road. But the futuristic shape didn’t age well, lasting barely a decade.

GM’s Fleeting Fastback Phase: The 1941-52 Streamliners — Mac’s Motor City Garage