Tag: Terry Shea

A pair of De Loreans with ultra-low-mileage and sequential VINs makes us ask: What do you think of the “barn find” trend? – Terry Shea @Hemmings

A pair of De Loreans with ultra-low-mileage and sequential VINs makes us ask: What do you think of the “barn find” trend? – Terry Shea @Hemmings

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In recent years, you can’t go far in the world of collector cars without coming across a seemingly unending litany of “barn find” examples. Covered in dust, dirt, grime, chicken droppings or perhaps used as an impromptu shelf, a place to stack wooden pallets—whatever the case, the more inglorious a special car was treated, it seems, the better the story.

Articles and videos abound of people uncovering and rescuing these cars, whether found in an actual barn or some other structure. Perhaps we’ve become bored of stories of incredibly restorations (say it ain’t so!) or one-owner cars kept pristine for years.There’s no denying the allure of the barn find.

A couple of years back during the Scottsdale auctions, a barn-find Mercedes-Benz 300SL Gullwing outpaced several restored examples sold that year, including some by hundreds of thousands of dollars. Years ago, these sort of cars might have been found and restored before anyone knew anything about them.

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Grand Wagoneer, the luxury SUV before the luxury was a thing – Terry Shea @Hemmings

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Before there was Escalade, before Navigator, and certainly before anything BMW X or Audi Q, there was Grand Wagoneer, pretty much standing alone as the luxury utility vehicle that maintained all of the capability of a proper Jeep product. Sure, Land Rover’s Range Rover was available in the U.S. from the mid-1980s, but market penetration was pretty limited.

In just about any town of any size in the USA with a Jeep dealership, you could buy a Grand Wagoneer.With its DI-NOC woodgrain sides against the Dark Baltic Blue paint, leather interior and full slate of power options—from back when that was a thing reserved for luxury cars, this 1990 Jeep Grand Wagoneer currently listed on Hemmings Auctions was the model for future luxury SUVs. Today’s fancy truck-wagons are largely equipped with fully independent suspensions, but this Grand Wagoneer still rolls on its original solid Dana 44 axles suspended by leaf springs front and rear.

In other words, it still has all of the good truck stuff that made Wagoneers extremely capable off road.

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Car Photography 101: Get the right “hero” and exterior shots to get buyers excited – Terry Shea @Hemmings

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Photographing your car, part 2

Last week, we looked at getting your car ready to photograph for an auction or classified. This week, we look at some tips for getting the best glamour shots and overall images of your vehicle. For all of our advice on how to photograph your car for maximum success, check out our Car Photography 101 tag page.
Your lead image is important as it will be the first thing viewers see when browsing Hemmings AuctionsHemmings Classifieds, or anywhere else you might try to sell your vehicle. A search might show potential buyers the listing for your vehicle, but a subpar picture could keep them from clicking and reading more; the automotive shopping equivalent of swiping left, in modern parlance. It’s best to make your car stand out.

 

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Car Photography 101: A few minutes of photo prep will help bring top dollar for your online car listing – Terry Shea @Hemmings

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Selling a car on the internet means you’ll have shoppers looking from a long distance, and photography is a critically important part of any online auction or classified listing. A picture is no longer an enticement for an in-person viewing, and good photos can make the difference between a quick sale at a good price versus months of inaction and lowball offers.
We’re here to help. In the first of a seven-part series on photographing your vehicle for sale, we’re covering the steps to take before shooting, like preparing the car and finding a suitable photo location. To get the most interest and top dollar for your car, read on. For more advice, find the rest of the series on our Car Photography 101 tag page.
Do the little fixes, then clean—and clean out—your car
  • Make all the quick fixes the car needs
  • Clean your car inside and out
  • Don’t just stop at the interior and exterior, show some love to the engine bay and trunk
The first step to good presentation of your car is preparing it for photography. Your car should be auction ready even before you submit it, and even if you’re only posting a classified. Needs a small repair, but “it only takes a few minutes” and you already have the part? Well, spend the few minutes and get it done. Leaving those repairs for the next owner keeps potential bidders away and invites hagglers to talk down your asking price

The 1960 Cadillac Eldorado Biarritz was GM’s best when GM was building the best – Terry Shea @Hemmings

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There was a period from the mid-1950s through the late 1960s when, it could be argued, General Motors was almost certainly building the best cars in the American market. Not only was the company the largest automaker in the world, it was also the biggest and one of the most influential corporations of any kind. GM had a swagger about it, a swagger that was backed up by an ambitious and comprehensive product line that offered something for every member of the car-buying public.
With a market share that annually approached 50 percent (and at least once crested that mark in the Sixties), GM easily bested second-place Ford and pretty much dwarfed everybody else. To achieve that sort of dominance, GM had to produce something that suited and appealed to virtually every conceivable kind of buyer, from the compact Chevrolet Corvair for budget-minded shoppers, to premium automobiles for those of serious means.
GM’s status and immense revenues at the top of the heap allowed it to invest heavily in product, at a time before badge engineering took over from actual engineering. While the man on the street often thought of Chevy competing with Ford, the folks inside Chevy were often looking to Oldsmobile or Pontiac, possibly even Buick, as competitors, each division with its own powerplants, some with their own transmissions, as well. The quality and ingenuity showed through, too, as an Oldsmobile 98 and Buick Electra might have been built on the same C-body platform, but each model felt and looked different, and had entirely different running gear.

This or That: Hemmings Auction Restomod Edition – Terry Shea @Hemmings

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While we all have our favorite niches in this hobby, you’d have to be living under a rock if you weren’t aware that restomods have been hot for several years now, with plenty of action heating up the live—and online—auctions.

Restomods are most typically muscle cars with more modern engines, better suspensions and braking components, and often have a level of modification to the exterior and interior, with the latter geared as much toward comfort of driving as anything else. These changes can range from the more simple engine swap to a wholesale customization of a car in nearly every facet. The restomod craze is just the latest iteration of a desire to hot rod cars that goes back to the beginning of the hobby. And, like any good hot rod, a good restomod is its own animal, a one-of-a-kind vehicle that reflects the vision of its builder as much as a car can.

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White House Mobility – 1909 White Model M – Terry Shea @Hemmings

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PRESIDENT TAFT’S 1909 WHITE MODEL M STEAM CAR

I am sure the automobile coming in as a toy of the wealthier class is going to prove most useful of them all to all classes, rich and poor. —William Howard Taft

The American people elected William Howard Taft president in November of 1908, yet before he entered Washington for his inauguration four months later, he lobbied for a small fleet of cars for the White House. Taft’s desire to formally adopt the automobile came across as controversial. His predecessor—and later political rival—Theodore Roosevelt was no fan of cars and considered them dirty and noisy, as did many other people. Of course, Roosevelt, the former cavalry officer, was a noted horseman and favored travel by carriage, his loyalties firmly with the equine. But Taft, who served as Secretary of War under Roosevelt, would have none of it.

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PRESIDENT TAFT’S 1909 WHITE MODEL M STEAM CAR

Related – Steam Rally at Picket Piece Hampshire

Roadmaster Reborn Part 2 – 1938 Roadmaster Sport Phaeton – Terry Shea @Hemmings

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AN AMATEUR RESTORER LEARNS AS HE GOES IN COMPLETING THIS 1938 BUICK 80-C SPORT PHAETON—PART II

Body and paintwork is not rocket science, but it’s hardly learned in a day, with great results almost always requiring extensive experience. Having worked in the automotive business for more than a decade and a half, first with a NASCAR team and now as part of a multi-state dealer group, Brian DePouli has spent plenty of time around cars, just not a whole lot of time in a paint booth. Still, that didn’t deter him from tackling much of the body and finish work during the restoration of his 1938 Buick Roadmaster 80-C Convertible, a process that we initially covered last month.

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AN AMATEUR RESTORER LEARNS AS HE GOES IN COMPLETING THIS 1938 BUICK 80-C SPORT PHAETON—PART II

Roadmaster Reborn – 1938 Roadmaster Sport Phaeton – Terry Shea @Hemmings

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A BUICK LOVER BREATHES NEW LIFE INTO THIS 1938 ROADMASTER 80-C SPORT PHAETON—PART I

 

Claiming membership in the Buick Club of America since he was three years old as his father was a fan, too, Brian DePouli has spent his life around the cars bearing the tri-shield emblem. In fact, it was Brian’s father, Ed, already an owner of a 1938 Buick Roadmaster sedan, who bought the car on these pages, when Brian was just four years old (in 1984).

Roadmaster Reborn – 1938 Roadmaster Sport Phaeton

It’s a bit of a mouthful, but Buick called it the Roadmaster 80-C Convertible Streamline Sport Phaeton, or simply Sport Phaeton, or 80-C, for short. Technically, it’s not so much a phaeton as it is a convertible sedan, but Buick was selling a near-luxury product and surely the phaeton name fit.

Roadmaster Reborn – 1938 Roadmaster Sport Phaeton

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