Tag: 1929

Stromberg Carburetors – Jim O’Clair @Hemmings

Stromberg Carburetors – Jim O’Clair @Hemmings

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One of the most popular carburetor choices used by Ford and Lincoln, as well as several other auto manufacturers, is the Stromberg two-barrel. The most desirable of these is the “97;” however, four other versions were also offered by Ford: the “L,” the “40,” the “48” and the “81.”

The model “40” was the first generation of the Stromberg dual-downdraft or two-barrel design and saw limited use on some of the early 1934 V-8s. The 48s were the original-equipment carburetors for the 1934 and 1935 Ford flathead V-8s. The 97s were offered on the 85hp V-8s from 1936 to early 1938, and the 81s powered the 60hp V-8s in 1937 and ’38. Stromberg also produced a model “L” which had a one-inch venturi and was used only on 1936-’37 Lincoln V-12 engines.

Stromberg 97 cores can be difficult to find, but can be identified by a raised “97” cast into the center section; the Indiana-built units had an “EE-1” stamped onto the base. Units built in the Elmira, New York, factory can be identified by a “1-1” casting number on the base. Although the EE-1 castings are the most sought after, the New Y-built units were an improved design that had better response coming off idle. The model 48 units, rated at 170 cfm, share the same base casting as the 97s but had a larger 1-1/32-inch bore diameter. The 97s got their name because of the 31/32-inch-bore diameter (.97-inch) and were rated at 155 cfm. Model 81s have a 13/16-inch bore diameter (.8125-inch) and were rated at 125 cfm. All three are great for using in pairs on smaller-cubic-inch engines. The model “L” was rated at 160 cfm, and installing them on larger-displacement engines will usually require a 3 x 2-barrel or 3-deuce setup.

So what can they fit? There are a lot of aftermarket Edelbrock, Weiand and Offenhauser intake manifolds that will accommodate the 3-bolt Stromberg mounting base. Obviously, Ford flathead manifolds of the 1930s are their primary candidates. But the Slingshot manifold that was designed by Vic Edelbrock Sr. was just the beginning of intake and Stromberg configurations that have been offered over the last 60 years. Y-shaped manifolds are also available, allowing you to install two Strombergs on a single-barrel manifold. There are base plate adapters to convert a single-barrel manifold to the 3-bolt Stromberg 2-barrel and to adapt a four-barrel spread-bore manifold to accept dual 97s. Plus, there are 3 x 2 and 4 x 2, manifolds for 1953-’56 Chrysler Hemis and 1955-’86 small-block Chevys. You can even still find 6 x 2 manifolds for most Chevy engines. All of these manifolds are compatible with Strombergs as well as the Holley model 94, another 3-bolt two-barrel performance carb that was built by Holley and Chandler Grove for Ford, as an alternative to a Stromberg carburetor.

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Stromberg Carbs are available new, information can be found here

New Stromberg 97 on my 1929 Model A Sport Coupe.

Prohibition mash: The makings of a prewar sleeper – Daniel Beaudry @Hemmings

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This is where it starts… the stock 1929 Ford Tudor on the day I took delivery. From here, there will be a series of subtle hop-ups to arrive at a powerful interwar sleeper. Sorry–I couldn’t resist a bit of fun with a sepia-toned filter. Photos by the author except where noted.

A few weekends ago, members of my club generously descended upon my garage for a big “thrash” to help me finish my 1931 Ford Model A/B bobtail speedster. When father-and-son Barnstormers VSC (“Vintage Speed Club”) members Brian and Matthew Cholerton arrived, they were towing my next project: a 1929 Ford Model A Tudor sedan. It came at just the right time, because it would prove a positive counterbalance to some unexpected setbacks with the speedster, validating the wisdom of having at least two vehicles to play with.

For almost as long as I had been working on the speedster, I had known that I also wanted a hot-rodded sedan, so when I discovered that Brian had one and that he was planning on selling, we quickly came to an agreement. He even very generously towed it the 200-plus miles from his home to mine. Though I wasn’t quite mentally or financially ready for it, there it was, exactly what I had been hoping for.

And what I had been hoping for was an affordable Model A Tudor in running condition with a serviceable body, but one that wasn’t rare or in such good condition that it would be a good candidate for restoration. As someone whose tendencies run toward preserving historical artifacts (rather than altering or even restoring them), I knew it would be a long time before I’d find one that fit the bill as well as this one did whenever I finally decided I was “ready” to buy one.

As far as this particular sedan goes, and 1929 Tudors in general, they are indeed special… because with 523,922 of them rolling out of Ford’s factories, they hold the record for the greatest number produced of any Model A in any body style for any year. So this means I don’t have to feel quite as bad about hot-rodding the A, at least from a rarity standpoint

In terms of condition, while it starts up, runs, and stops well, has a remarkably clean underside, and no significant dents or rust, it appears that the owner before Brian might have begun restoring the car but then lost interest and hastily put it back together for sale. So while a new correct “Cobra Long Grain” vinyl top had been installed, many other condition issues went partially or entirely unaddressed.

Most obvious of these: Its paint demonstrates a tendency to chip, its driver’s-side door is significantly out of alignment, and its interior is limited to only seat covers and door panels made from cardboard boxes upholstered in gray crushed velvet (crushed velvet?!). Behind those door panels, the metal window anti-rattlers–both bent, and for some reason at the same angle–had been loosely stashed and, along with one internal upright support with broken rivets, had been creating a significant racket when driving.

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Stromberg 97 and Secrets of Speed Scalded Dog Manifold Upgrade for the 1929 Model A Ford Sport Coupe

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Some time ago before my Dad passed away we had chatted about what upgrades might have been done to the coupe back in his days. He was born in 1936. Before I managed to get the parts my Dad sadly passed away.

So as a bit of a tribute I bought the following parts


Stromberg 97 Carb – from Dave O’Neil (O’Neill Vintage Ford)
Scalded Dog Manifold – from Charlie Yapp (Secrets of Speed)
Chrome Air Scoop – from Dave O’Neil (O’Neill Vintage Ford)
Facet Electric Fuel Pump – Carbuilder.com
Petrol King Fuel Pressure Regulator – Carbuilder.com

Fuel Pressure Gauge – Carbuilder.com
Braided Fuel Line – Carbuilder.com
Copper Fuel Line – Amazon
Rubber Fuel Pipe – Carbuilder.com
Various Connections and Unions
Jubilee Clips -Screwfix
Fuel Pump Relay – eBay
Rocker Switch – eBay


Parts I already had


MSD plug lead set and tool
Modern distributor cap
Wire and connectors

My friend Austen fabricated the required new throttle link rod from the dimensions provided by Charlie

First job is to remove the existing manifold and carburetor

This is a Model B carburetor fitted by a previous owner, this carb has had a brazed repair in the body which whilst a bit rough and ready worked fine.

These inlet manifold fixing bolt holes where not used with the original manifold, but are needed for the new one. These were cleaned out with a tap.

The carburetor and manifold were assembled and bolted into place

First attempt at wiring the fuel pump and the use of braided fuel line. This looked quite bad as the wiring was temporary to get home from my friends workshop. I didn’t like the look of the braided line.

Decided to go with copper fuel line with rubber termination to solve any issues with engine movement that may cause leaks.

The fuel pump and regulator fit nicely in the chassis rail, these were removed to change 90 degree elbows for a better pipe run

First attempt with copper/rubber fuel pipe as you can see the wiring is a lot tidier, you can also see the pipe run between the pump and the regulator. The wiring will be tidied and weatherproofed further. Use of the screwed connector has been chosen to make a pump change on the road easier.

This is a view from above, quite tidy but still not happy! Too much pipe run above the exhaust manifold and the carb feed pipe is not secured enough for my liking.

At this point a leak from the sediment trap was noticed, caused by the failure of the gasket

The reproduction item is made of neoprene but a horrible fit and had to be cut to fit. Bowl and trap were cleaned and then reassembled

Wasn’t happy with the throttle feel so spaced with some fibre washers, a lot better now. The throttle also stuck a little, so the joints on the rods were lubricated and Clive at Stromberg provided a nifty little solution to snap the throttle shut. This also doubled as a safety measure as per Charlie’s advice in case of linkage failure.

As you can see runs very well, starts better, warms up quicker, very happy.

More once I get a few trips under my belt with the new set up.

Retrofestival Newbury 2020 (2021)

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Finally the 2020 Retorfestival at Newbury took place this weekend 14/15 August.

It was great to see everyone out and about with a large amount of US iron on show.

Nice Hot Rod parked next to us!

Really like the Oldsmobile Opera Coupe parked behind us, beautiful car

Here’s a slideshow with a small selection of what was on show.

Almighty rattle on the way back, sounded really bad, luckily just a loose bumper bracket!

Another Pandemic Project!

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Part of the no car show side effect of the pandemic is that you are kind of forced into doing the stuff you have been putting off for years, last year and earlier this year it was interior trim, this time it’s painting!

The rear end of the chassis, ancillaries, lamps are all freshly painted.

Also added is the new to me 1929 Penna licence plate along with the strengthening of the original number plate and fitting reflector bolts.

This 1929 Ford Model A Hides Rally Car Mods and a 9,000-RPM Cosworth Engine – James Gilboy @TheDrive

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eing an international-level pro racing driver isn’t half bad, as far as jobs go. Not just because it entails being paid to race, but also because it can involve traveling abroad, which sets the stage for the kinds of magical moments we rarely experience as adults. One such experience can be falling in love—not necessarily with a person, but sometimes an object; an artifact that can take you back to some of the most precious seconds of your life. And after racing Rally Argentina in 1993, one rally driver did just that after stumbling across a 1929 Ford Model A he couldn’t leave behind.

According to a post on Facebook page Apex Automotor, the unnamed driver had the Model A shipped to Finland, suggesting the car’s owner to be the only Finn to enter the rally, four-time WRC champion Juha Kankkunen. Kankkunen’s car or not, they sent the Ford to a Ferrari and vintage car specialist shop Makela Auto Tuning, which stripped the Ford down to its frame before performing a comprehensive restoration and partial modernization.

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Using a High Arc Spring Suspension on a Model A Roadster – Tim Matthews @SpeedWayMotors

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Speedway Motors employee Tim M. takes his creativity up a notch with this installment by incorporating a Model A rear crossmember and a high arc spring into his ’29 roadster build. See what Tim goes through to restore the spring and gets it ready to fit on the car.

I’ve always wanted to build an early 50’s style Model A hot rod on a pinched deuce frame incorporating a model A rear cross member and high arch stock spring. I was lucky to find a deal on such a frame that had already been started, but the first owner installed a triangulated four bar rear for a more modern street rod. While they work great, a 4-bar suspension just wouldn’t fit the mid-50’s era build I was aiming for so I decided to remove it. I cut out the 4-bar and replace it with stock parts a builder might have used back in 55. Why use a high arch Model A Ford spring in a 32 frame you may ask? This answer is simple. Forever guys have been doing this to clear a quick change rear end. When I scrounge up enough money for my quick change this rear suspension will not only be period correct; it will also clear the extended case of the quick change but sit just high enough to show it off nicely.

In this article I will document the work done to my rusty 100 year old Model A spring to bring it back to life. I will talk about some important information to keep in mind regarding old springs while also showing some handy items available to make using an old spring easy

I tracked down my Model A spring in an old junk yard back home in South Dakota. The spring was resting in a pile of other parts not far from an original dilapidated Model A frame. I knew I needed a good high arch spring and the rear cross member on the frame looked good so I brought them both home. In thinking about what the roads around America looked like in 1928 it quickly became apparent why so many frames cracked, and also why so many of the original springs took a beating. If you are scrounging original parts like me keep this in mind, and make sure items are free of stress cracks and heavy rust. Most original A springs will be rusty to some degree, but watch for heavy pitting on the flat surfaces between the leaves where moisture would sit.

Cleaning up my old spring was going to take time and patience! If you want to fast forward to another area of your project you could take the easy route here, and simply purchase Speedway Motors replacement high arch spring. Part number 91043102 fits both Model T and Model A, and is hot rod ready! I would recommend that route if time is of the essence

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Why the Ford Model A Fordor Sedan is the Best Family Car From 1929 – Paul Shinn @YouTube

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The Ford Model A Standard Fordor Sedan was introduced in 1929 and was the best family automobile a family man could buy. Today, we take a closer look at a completely original, unrestored 1929 Fordor Sedan model 165-B and take it for a drive. The video about this car from January 2020: https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature… http://www.paulshinn.us

3600 miles behind the wheel of a 1929 Model A on Route 66 -Phillip Thomas @Hagerty

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Phillip Thomas | Hagerty Media Site

Context is everything, right? For modern traffic, Route 66 is a slow, constricted highway, especially when compared to the interstate highway system. For a 1929 Model A, Route 66 is just the right speed.

Just as time and technology ditched the horse for the horseless carriage, those forces eventually bypassed Route 66 for interstate highways. Communities built along the highway withered while the traffic flow was diverted sometimes hundreds of miles away to newly-built freeways. Priorities for infrastructure had changed and no longer supported aging mining towns and farming communities; instead, Eisenhower and his administration sought to funnel the masses and their goods between metropolises with military efficiency.

Among the forsaken, recession-plagued byways of America, Route 66 became a martyr. Its meandering pavement is synonymous with the mystique of the open road, drawing those who crave an unpredictable journey and delight in driving for driving’s sake. One such scenic traveler is Ryan Tebo, who has been rattling and rumbling across from coast to coast in his 1929 Ford Model A for the past two weeks.

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