Category: 1937

Deciphering our 1937 Ford race car’s front suspension | Redline Update #84 – @Hagerty

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This week Davin gets to tackle something he’s been dreading for quite a bit, the front suspension of our 1937 Ford race car. When Snowball and the boys put this car together they worked with the parts they had or could salvage from somewhere near. They didn’t have a website to order from and wait for the proper parts to arrive in the mail. They improvised and made it work. Davin respects what they got up and running, but that won’t help him remember how everything is assembled.

Tetanus Cord Proves Custom Work Is Art, Without a Doubt – Elena Gorgan @autoevolution

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Not that there is much doubt about it among car enthusiasts, but custom work is art. British designer and customizer Andy Saunders is proof of that.

As part of autoevolution’s Custom Builds Month coverage, we’ve already discussed a couple of Saunders’ most famous projects: the MINI HaHa and Claustro Phobia, another MINI that held the Guinness World Record for the lowest car. If these two builds did not get you thinking “wow, this is art!,” Tetanus will.

The name might not be very artsy, but this build is a monument of sophistication and elegance, artistry and wild creativity. Tetanus Cord, or Tetanus for short, started out as a 1937 Cord 812 Westchester sedan and came with a very interesting history. It belonged to royalty and then came very close to becoming a race car, before being suddenly and mysteriously abandoned on a field for decades.

An original right-hand drive export model meant for the UK market, the Cord was sold as new by R.S.M Automobiles of Berkeley Square, London to the Earl of Derby, according to Saunders’ official webpage. The Earl drove it for a few years before deciding to part ways with it: Saunders believes it had developed a gearbox problem and the owner probably thought buying a new one was less of a hassle than having it fixed. Rich people mentality

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1937 Ford Rat Rod Looks so Beat Down It’s Almost Elegant – Daniel Patrascu @AutoEvolution

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Nothing in the world spells rat rod better than the Fords of old. Provided you can get your hands on something from before the war, which has been sitting around unattended for years, and have enough talent to make something ugly look good, then you might have a winner project on your hands.

A custom shop from Florida by the name of Smash Customs did just that, and being gifted with the tools and imagination to make it work, turned a 1937 Ford Phaeton into a rat rod to die for.

Known to its fans as the Rat, the car is currently selling, just like you see it in the gallery above: a beat down exterior, with holes and rust put there by the 30 years it spent in a barn somewhere and strategically kept by the builders.

But as it often is the case with rat rods, the exterior look is deceit in its purest form. A lot of work went into making the aging form of the car a force to be reckoned with, but that was mostly done to the hardware we cannot see.

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Blue Collar Beauty – 1937 Hudson Terraplane – Mike McNessor @Hemmings

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Classic Truck: 1937 Hudson Terraplane

Terraplane’s Cab Pickup Express might look a little too jaunty for the job site but, by 1937 standards, this was a stout light truck. If you glanced under the rear of a Series 70, and longer wheelbase Series 78 Terraplane commercial rig, you’d see a thick pair of leaf springs—15 leaves in both—that lent these trucks a hefty ¾-ton rating.

You’d also notice the sturdy “Double Drop 2-X” frame—it was the same design used in Terraplane (as well as Hudson) cars, but it looked purpose-built for hauling. A pair of boxed side rails—71/8 inches deep at their widest point between the axles—were tied together with a massive X-shaped member in the center and a smaller X-member in front. There were also three heavy-duty crossmembers, including a new one for the 1937 model year, added at the rear kickup. The Double Drop 2-X frame was riveted together, while the boxed sections of the rails were welded in place with 142 welds. For added rigidity, the vehicles’ floors were bolted to the frames at multiple points in what Terraplane called “Monobilt” construction.

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Lost and Found: Did Ford offer a coupe with beds in 1935? – David Conwill @HemmingsClassicCar

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Did Ford offer a coupe with beds in 1935?

Reader Joey Crosslin wrote in with the above photo. He said “I recently found a photo of my father’s first car. He passed away a while back. It appears to look like a ’35 Ford coupe with a rumble seat but not exactly sure. Can you can identify what model it was? A couple people told me there was a model that folded down so someone could sleep in it.”

Well, to start with, we are certain this is indeed a 1935 Ford. Specifically it’s a Model 48 (as were all U.S.-built ’35 Fords) five-window standard coupe. Five-window coupes have two windows on each side, whereas three-window coupes have only one large window on each side. We know this isn’t a De Luxe because the windshield frame and grille are painted rather than being bright metal. The rumble seat was an extra-cost option, though we can’t really tell from the photo if there was one installed on this car.

1937 Nash brochure featuring the “distinctive Nash bed-arrangement” which was to become a hallmark of Nash and AMC memories and the butt of too many drive-in movie jokes.

Did Ford offer a coupe with beds in 1935?

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Related – Vintage matched pair: 1935 Ford Tudor with camping trailer

The Forgotten “Elvis Roadster” is For Sale! – Zach Martin @HotRod

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The Forgotten “Elvis Roadster” is For Sale! – Zach Martin @HotRod

On August 31, 2019 the roadster that Elvis Presley drove in the hit film Loving You will be auctioned off in the Kruse GWS Auction titled The Artifacts of Hollywood & Music at the Hollywood Hard Rock Café. This car only had one owner, and it wasn’t The King. It was owned and built by hot rodding pioneer John Athan in 1937. It is a Ford Model A body sitting atop 1932 Ford frame rails powered by a Flathead V8 with twin Stromberg carburetors.

The car was driven by Elvis himself in his first role in the 1957 film Loving You. It was all but forgotten even by his biggest fans because according to GWS Auctions, Athan had a lot of sentimental attachment. So much so that one of the biggest music and pop culture icons, Elvis Presely, couldn’t even buy it.

Read the article here

Related – Rare Vintage Photos of Deuce Roadsters Racing on California’s Dry Lakes – Robert Genat, Don Cox – Photographer

1937 Samco Cord Replica – @Hemmings

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Seller’s Description:

Here is another of our popular 1937 Cord replicas. this one is also factory built by Samco in 1970 & is the Warrior model, 302 V8 Ford, automatic, Power Brakes & Steering, rear jump seat, like new tan top, rich red interior, luggage rack with rear spare, CD player, suicide doors, 1 piece body, & now 48 years old!! 220HP, heater etc.

This is one of the coolest looking replicas ever built. 1937 Cord that was factory built in 1970 by Sports Automobile Maufacturing Company in Tulsa, Oklahoma- SAMCO & the model is the Warrior, & our other one listed in the Royale. has the famous Coffin Nose grille, front & rear Cord bumpers, & still powered by the peppy 220 HP Ford 5.0 liter 302 V8 engine with the 3 speed C4 automatic transmission, Power brakes & Power steering, heater. Just rebuilt the carburetor, new plugs, points ,cap etc. Thick suicide doors with lift out side windows, rear jump seat, like new tan top, & titled as a 1970 Cord, rich red interior, side supercharger pipes, luggage rack with rear spare tire, Michelin radials, Cord front emblem, new CD player just installed, full tilt up front end for easy engine access, chrome air cleaner & custom valve covers, very clean engine area, 1 piece body, 2900 pounds with 108″ wheelbase, wood grain dash with custom steering wheel, 3 rear view mirrors, seat belts, 6 black face classic styled gauges, tinted glass, 2 piece windshield, & showing 43,000 miles in 48 years!! paint is peeling in some areas, & tach isn’t working right, runs & drives great, has a clean Florida tile in Bobs Classics Inc. name. and being 48 years old now, its actually a classic, even being a replica, & exempt from all emissions, & eligible for antique tags in most states. only 400 cars were ever built from 1968 to 1970. Vin# is 099W1127F a lot of car for only $22,900.!! that’s all $22,900.!! we can ship it to your door, by enclosed, insured, truck carrier, & we also ship almost anywhere in the world by enclosed ship containers. a lot of fun for the bucks!!

See the listing here

60 Hp V8 also known as the “V8-60” – Van Pelt Sales

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Ford came out with the small V8 in 1937 to provide a more fuel efficient and less expensive option to the regular 85hp equipped cars and light commercial vehicles. These engines were obvious by their small size and the 17 Stud heads. Ford also built the 60hp engine for the European market with some modifications. The water pumps are also mounted in a common casting that mounts to the front of the engine and serves as the timing cover and engine mount. In the first year of production, these engines had “tin” sided outer water jackets which were welded onto the cylinder portion of the block. The production of the tin-sided blocks ended in April, 1937. Late 1937 and newer model year vehicles had the newer and more conventional “all cast iron” blocks. 1940 was the final year for the 60hp since the new 90hp six cylinder engine would debut for 1941.

The V8 Sixty was a popular engine for aftermarket applications, particularly in midget race cars in the 1950’s and 60’s. It can also be found in some of today’s custom “big bike” motorcycles. Due to its low horsepower and torque, the engine was not considered very powerful by customers for the passenger cars and light trucks that Ford installed them in. The Ford three speed transmission used with the V860 is unique to that engine and does not interchange with the standard 85 or 95hp flathead V8 engines.

Read the rest of the specifications here at the source (Van Pelt Sales)

Tom “The Mongoose” McEwen, 1937-2018

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Sad news this week with the passing of Tom “The Mongoose” McEwen who along with Don “The Snake” Prudhomme set the drag racing world alight in the 60’s. The two eventually toured as a pair sponsored by Mattel who produced a range of toys to match.

There was also been a film released in 2013 celebrating the pair’s rivalry entitled Snake & Mongoose

Read Kurt Ernst’s detailed article here at Hemmings